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Last Updated: January 22, 2020

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR ACETAMINOPHEN

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505(b)(2) Clinical Trials for acetaminophen

This table shows clinical trials for potential 505(b)(2) applications. See the next table for all clinical trials
Trial Type Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
OTC NCT00245375 A Trial Comparing Combination Therapy of Acetaminophen Plus Ibuprofen Versus Tylenol #3 for the Treatment of Pain After Outpatient Surgery Completed McNeil Consumer & Specialty Pharmaceuticals, a Division of McNeil-PPC, Inc. N/A 2005-01-01 Increasingly in general surgery, the investigators are conducting outpatient day surgery. Ambulatory surgery currently comprises 60 to 70% of surgeries performed in North America. These patients all require some form of analgesia which can be taken at home in the first few days after the surgery. The current standard at the investigators' centre and many others in the maritime provinces is to provide a prescription for oral acetaminophen plus codeine or oxycodone (Tylenol #3®, Percocet ®). Some patients may receive more potent opioids such as oral hydromorphone (Dilaudid®). Unfortunately, the most commonly prescribed medication (Tylenol #3®) is often poorly tolerated by patients, has several undesirable side effects, and may not provide effective pain relief. In the investigators' experience, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are uncommonly a routine addition to the home analgesic regimen. Tylenol #3®, in the investigators' experience and opinion, is a poor post surgical pain medication. They hope to show that a combination of ibuprofen and acetaminophen is better for pain relief after these procedures. The combination of acetaminophen and ibuprofen would be a safe, cheap, and readily available regimen. Unfortunately, as the prescribing practices of surgeons are old habits, it will require a very convincing argument to get them to change their practices. A randomized controlled trial comparing these two regimens, the investigators hope, would be a powerful enough argument. The hypothesis of this study, therefore, is that the pain control provided by a combination of acetaminophen plus ibuprofen (650 mg/400 mg four times per day) will be superior to Tylenol #3® (600 mg acetaminophen/60 mg codeine/15 mg caffeine four times per day). This study will attempt to enroll 150 patients in total. Eligible patients will be identified by their attending surgeon and contacted by study personnel. Patients who enroll in the study will undergo their surgery in the usual manner. After the surgery, in the recovery room, once they are ready to go home, they will be randomized to receive combination A or B and be given a week's worth of pain medication. They will then go home and take this medication as directed. They will record their pain intensity and pain relief once per day using a diary provided in the study package. One week after their surgery, they will return to the hospital clinic and be seen by the study nurse. They will hand over the diary and any unused medication. They will also be asked several questions regarding their overall satisfaction, incidence of side effects, and how long until they were pain free. The risks of participating in this study are minimal from the risks inherent to the procedures and medications the patients would receive within the standard of care. Ibuprofen is a commonly used NSAID which is widely available over the counter and has an established safety profile. The most common adverse effects of ibuprofen and other NSAIDs are gastrointestinal bleeding and ulceration. Other less common adverse effects include nephrotoxicity, hypersensitivity reactions, hepatic dysfunction (longterm use), and cognitive dysfunction. The investigators' patients will be selected to exclude those most at risk for these complications (see exclusion criteria). Acetaminophen has few side effects, with no adverse effects on platelet function and no evidence of gastric irritation.
OTC NCT00245375 A Trial Comparing Combination Therapy of Acetaminophen Plus Ibuprofen Versus Tylenol #3 for the Treatment of Pain After Outpatient Surgery Completed Nova Scotia Health Authority N/A 2005-01-01 Increasingly in general surgery, the investigators are conducting outpatient day surgery. Ambulatory surgery currently comprises 60 to 70% of surgeries performed in North America. These patients all require some form of analgesia which can be taken at home in the first few days after the surgery. The current standard at the investigators' centre and many others in the maritime provinces is to provide a prescription for oral acetaminophen plus codeine or oxycodone (Tylenol #3®, Percocet ®). Some patients may receive more potent opioids such as oral hydromorphone (Dilaudid®). Unfortunately, the most commonly prescribed medication (Tylenol #3®) is often poorly tolerated by patients, has several undesirable side effects, and may not provide effective pain relief. In the investigators' experience, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are uncommonly a routine addition to the home analgesic regimen. Tylenol #3®, in the investigators' experience and opinion, is a poor post surgical pain medication. They hope to show that a combination of ibuprofen and acetaminophen is better for pain relief after these procedures. The combination of acetaminophen and ibuprofen would be a safe, cheap, and readily available regimen. Unfortunately, as the prescribing practices of surgeons are old habits, it will require a very convincing argument to get them to change their practices. A randomized controlled trial comparing these two regimens, the investigators hope, would be a powerful enough argument. The hypothesis of this study, therefore, is that the pain control provided by a combination of acetaminophen plus ibuprofen (650 mg/400 mg four times per day) will be superior to Tylenol #3® (600 mg acetaminophen/60 mg codeine/15 mg caffeine four times per day). This study will attempt to enroll 150 patients in total. Eligible patients will be identified by their attending surgeon and contacted by study personnel. Patients who enroll in the study will undergo their surgery in the usual manner. After the surgery, in the recovery room, once they are ready to go home, they will be randomized to receive combination A or B and be given a week's worth of pain medication. They will then go home and take this medication as directed. They will record their pain intensity and pain relief once per day using a diary provided in the study package. One week after their surgery, they will return to the hospital clinic and be seen by the study nurse. They will hand over the diary and any unused medication. They will also be asked several questions regarding their overall satisfaction, incidence of side effects, and how long until they were pain free. The risks of participating in this study are minimal from the risks inherent to the procedures and medications the patients would receive within the standard of care. Ibuprofen is a commonly used NSAID which is widely available over the counter and has an established safety profile. The most common adverse effects of ibuprofen and other NSAIDs are gastrointestinal bleeding and ulceration. Other less common adverse effects include nephrotoxicity, hypersensitivity reactions, hepatic dysfunction (longterm use), and cognitive dysfunction. The investigators' patients will be selected to exclude those most at risk for these complications (see exclusion criteria). Acetaminophen has few side effects, with no adverse effects on platelet function and no evidence of gastric irritation.
OTC NCT00267293 Ibuprofen Alone and in Combination With Acetaminophen for Treatment of Fever Completed Children Youth and Family Consortium Phase 4 2006-01-01 Currently, when a child has fever either ibuprofen (e.g. Motrin, Advil) or acetaminophen (e.g. Tylenol) is given. Both Ibuprofen and Acetaminophen are approved for over the counter use for treatment of fever by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This study hopes to determine whether giving both medications together is better than giving one medication alone for the treatment of fever.
>Trial Type >Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

All Clinical Trials for acetaminophen

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00000425 Toward Better Outcomes in Osteoarthritis Completed National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) Phase 3 1996-07-01 This study will determine if there is a difference between commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen (a pain-reliever that does not prevent inflammation) for treating knee pain in osteoarthritis (OA). The two main results we will look at are disease progression according to x-rays and disability over 3.5 years. Study participants with moderate knee OA and knee pain will continue taking their NSAID or stop taking their NSAID and start taking acetaminophen. Every 6 months we will send the participants questionnaires that ask about pain, medication use, and disability. We will take x-rays of the knees at the start of the study and again at the end of the study.
NCT00000425 Toward Better Outcomes in Osteoarthritis Completed Stanford University Phase 3 1996-07-01 This study will determine if there is a difference between commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen (a pain-reliever that does not prevent inflammation) for treating knee pain in osteoarthritis (OA). The two main results we will look at are disease progression according to x-rays and disability over 3.5 years. Study participants with moderate knee OA and knee pain will continue taking their NSAID or stop taking their NSAID and start taking acetaminophen. Every 6 months we will send the participants questionnaires that ask about pain, medication use, and disability. We will take x-rays of the knees at the start of the study and again at the end of the study.
NCT00000491 Aspirin-Myocardial Infarction Study (AMIS) Completed National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Phase 3 1974-10-01 To determine whether the daily administration of 1 gm of aspirin to individuals with a documented myocardial infarction would result in a significant reduction in mortality over a three year period.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for acetaminophen

Condition Name

Condition Name for acetaminophen
Intervention Trials
Pain 118
Pain, Postoperative 69
Postoperative Pain 50
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for acetaminophen
Intervention Trials
Pain, Postoperative 171
Osteoarthritis 65
Acute Pain 38
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Clinical Trial Locations for acetaminophen

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for acetaminophen
Location Trials
Canada 88
United Kingdom 28
France 15
Korea, Republic of 14
Brazil 14
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for acetaminophen
Location Trials
Texas 143
New York 94
California 91
Pennsylvania 69
Ohio 64
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Clinical Trial Progress for acetaminophen

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for acetaminophen
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 315
Phase 3 163
Phase 2/Phase 3 22
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for acetaminophen
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 389
Recruiting 211
Not yet recruiting 184
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for acetaminophen

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for acetaminophen
Sponsor Trials
M.D. Anderson Cancer Center 48
Mallinckrodt 29
Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. 15
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for acetaminophen
Sponsor Trials
Other 890
Industry 335
NIH 60
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