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Generated: December 14, 2018

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR VALIUM

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Clinical Trials for Valium

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary
NCT00001550 Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIg) for the Treatment of Stiff-Man Syndrome (SMS) Completed National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Phase 1 Stiff-man Syndrome (SMS) is a chronic, progressive disorder of the nervous system. It is associated with painful muscle spasms and rigidity involving muscles of the limbs, trunk, and neck. The cause of the disease is unknown, but researchers believe it may be a result of an autoimmune process. Patients with Stiff-man Syndrome may produce antibodies that attack enzymes required for the normal function of the nervous system. Steroids, plasmapheresis, and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) have been given to relieve some of the symptoms of Stiff-man Syndrome. However, none of these therapies have proven to be significantly effective. This study will attempt to determine the effectiveness of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) for the treatment of Stiff-mann Syndrome. Patients participating in this study will be divided into two groups. Group one will receive 2 injections of IVIg once a month for three months. Group two will receive 2 injections of placebo "inactive sterile water" once a month for three months. Following the three months of treatment, group one will begin taking the placebo and group two will begin taking IVIg for an additional 3 months. The drug will be considered effective if patients receiving it experience a significant improvement in muscle function, mobility, and stiffness.
NCT00055549 Dextromethorphan to Treat Patients With Voice Spasms Completed National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Phase 1 This study will examine how dextromethorphan, a drug that alters reflexes of the larynx (voice box), might change voice symptoms in people with voice disorders due to uncontrolled laryngeal muscle spasms. These include abductor spasmodic dysphonia (breathy voice breaks), adductor spasmodic dysphonia (vowel breaks), muscular tension dysphonia (tight strained voice), and vocal tremor (tremulous voice). Dextromethorphan-one of a group of drugs called NMDA antagonists-has been used for years in over-the-counter cough suppressant medicines. In animal studies, the drug has blocked one of the reflexes in the larynx that may be associated with spasms in the laryngeal muscles. This study will compare the effects of dextromethorphan, lorazepam (a valium-type drug), and a placebo (inactive substance) in patients with the four types of voice disorders described above. Patients with spasmodic dysphonia, muscular tension dysphonia and vocal tremor may be eligible for this study. Individuals who smoke or use tobacco, who have vocal nodules or polyps, or who have a history of airway obstruction may not participate. Candidates will be screened with a medical history and physical examination, a questionnaire, voice recording (repeating sentences into a microphone), and nasolaryngoscopy (examination of the larynx with a tube advanced through the nose). For the nasolaryngoscopy, the inside of the nose is sprayed with a decongestant (to open the nasal passages) and possibly a local anesthetic. A small, flexible tube called a nasolaryngoscope is passed through the nose to look at the larynx during speech and other tasks, such as singing, whistling and prolonged vowels. Participants will be admitted to the NIH Clinical Center for each of three visits, which will last from the afternoon of one day to late afternoon of the following day. At each visit, patients will complete a questionnaire, baseline speech recording, and a test for sedation level. They will take three pills-either dextromethorphan, lorazepam, or placebo-one every 6 hours. Vital signs will be checked every 6 hours and the level of sedation during waking hours will be monitored. One to three hours after taking the third pill, speech recording, questionnaire and test of sedation will be repeated to check for possible voice changes. Patients will be given a different pill at each visit.
NCT00106106 Acamprosate to Reduce Symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal Completed National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Phase 2 This study will examine whether a new drug called acamprosate can be helpful for alcohol withdrawal, a result of drinking high amounts of alcohol for long periods of time. Alcohol withdrawal can cause various symptoms, including nausea or vomiting, anxiety or depression, tremor, high blood pressure, and others. During withdrawal, brain chemicals called neurotransmitters change, with some rising to abnormally high levels. These changes may contribute to alcohol craving, drinking relapse and impaired mental performance. This study will see if taking acamprosate for 4 weeks can lower the levels of neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, lessen withdrawal symptoms and decrease alcohol craving and brain damage associated with withdrawal. Healthy normal volunteers and alcohol-dependent patients between 21 and 65 years of age may be eligible for this study. Participants are admitted to the hospital for 28 days. They receive standard inpatient care for alcohol detoxification, including a medical history and physical examination, neurological evaluation, laboratory tests, nursing, nutrition, discharge planning and referrals for treatment of concomitant conditions, if needed. In addition, they are randomly assigned to take either two acamprosate or two placebo pills three times a day for 28 days and undergo the following tests and procedures: - Days 1-28: Drug treatment. Patients take acamprosate or placebo daily. Patients with severe withdrawal symptoms may also receive diazepam (Valium). Throughout their hospitalization, patients fill out questionnaires about their emotional state and personality and are interviewed by staff about their mental health, use of alcohol, cigarettes, and illicit drugs, employment, support systems and family and social relationships, and their legal status. - Days 2 and 3: Blood tests. Blood is tested for levels of the stress hormones cortisol and ACTH, which are released to excess during alcohol withdrawal. For this test, a heparin lock (thin, flexible plastic tube with a rubber stopper on the end) is placed in an arm vein for blood collections each day at 6 AM, 12 noon, 6 PM and 12 midnight. Patients rest in bed for 30 minutes before each collection. - Day 4: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). These procedures are done at the same time. They use a strong magnetic field and radio waves to show structural and chemical changes in the brain. The patient lies on a table in a space enclosed by a metal cylinder (the scanner) for about 20 to 30 minutes during the test. - Day 5: Lumbar puncture (spinal tap). A local anesthetic is given to numb the area for the procedure. Then, a needle is inserted in the space between the bones in the lower back where the cerebrospinal fluid circulates below the spinal cord. A small amount of fluid is collected through the needle. - Days 5 and 6: Dexamethasone-corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) test. This test measures the effect of alcohol withdrawal on ACTH and cortisol. The patient takes a standard dose of the steroid dexamethasone at 11 PM on day 5. At noon the next day, they are given lunch and then stay in bed and rest. A plastic tube is put in an arm vein. A salt water solution is slowly infused through the catheter and a blood sample is withdrawn through it. At 3 p.m., the patient is given 100 micrograms of the hormone CRF. Repeated blood samples are obtained to measure ACTH and cortisol. - Days 23-27: All of the tests done on days 2-6 are repeated, except the MRI. MRS is repeated to measure neurotransmitters.
NCT00106106 Acamprosate to Reduce Symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal Completed National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC) Phase 2 This study will examine whether a new drug called acamprosate can be helpful for alcohol withdrawal, a result of drinking high amounts of alcohol for long periods of time. Alcohol withdrawal can cause various symptoms, including nausea or vomiting, anxiety or depression, tremor, high blood pressure, and others. During withdrawal, brain chemicals called neurotransmitters change, with some rising to abnormally high levels. These changes may contribute to alcohol craving, drinking relapse and impaired mental performance. This study will see if taking acamprosate for 4 weeks can lower the levels of neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, lessen withdrawal symptoms and decrease alcohol craving and brain damage associated with withdrawal. Healthy normal volunteers and alcohol-dependent patients between 21 and 65 years of age may be eligible for this study. Participants are admitted to the hospital for 28 days. They receive standard inpatient care for alcohol detoxification, including a medical history and physical examination, neurological evaluation, laboratory tests, nursing, nutrition, discharge planning and referrals for treatment of concomitant conditions, if needed. In addition, they are randomly assigned to take either two acamprosate or two placebo pills three times a day for 28 days and undergo the following tests and procedures: - Days 1-28: Drug treatment. Patients take acamprosate or placebo daily. Patients with severe withdrawal symptoms may also receive diazepam (Valium). Throughout their hospitalization, patients fill out questionnaires about their emotional state and personality and are interviewed by staff about their mental health, use of alcohol, cigarettes, and illicit drugs, employment, support systems and family and social relationships, and their legal status. - Days 2 and 3: Blood tests. Blood is tested for levels of the stress hormones cortisol and ACTH, which are released to excess during alcohol withdrawal. For this test, a heparin lock (thin, flexible plastic tube with a rubber stopper on the end) is placed in an arm vein for blood collections each day at 6 AM, 12 noon, 6 PM and 12 midnight. Patients rest in bed for 30 minutes before each collection. - Day 4: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). These procedures are done at the same time. They use a strong magnetic field and radio waves to show structural and chemical changes in the brain. The patient lies on a table in a space enclosed by a metal cylinder (the scanner) for about 20 to 30 minutes during the test. - Day 5: Lumbar puncture (spinal tap). A local anesthetic is given to numb the area for the procedure. Then, a needle is inserted in the space between the bones in the lower back where the cerebrospinal fluid circulates below the spinal cord. A small amount of fluid is collected through the needle. - Days 5 and 6: Dexamethasone-corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) test. This test measures the effect of alcohol withdrawal on ACTH and cortisol. The patient takes a standard dose of the steroid dexamethasone at 11 PM on day 5. At noon the next day, they are given lunch and then stay in bed and rest. A plastic tube is put in an arm vein. A salt water solution is slowly infused through the catheter and a blood sample is withdrawn through it. At 3 p.m., the patient is given 100 micrograms of the hormone CRF. Repeated blood samples are obtained to measure ACTH and cortisol. - Days 23-27: All of the tests done on days 2-6 are repeated, except the MRI. MRS is repeated to measure neurotransmitters.
Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary

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Clinical Trial Conditions for Valium

Condition Name

Condition Name for Valium
Intervention Trials
Anxiety 2
Alcoholism 2
Idiopathic Hypersomnia 2
Hypersomnia 2
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Valium
Intervention Trials
Anxiety Disorders 5
Narcolepsy 2
Alcoholism 2
Hypersomnolence, Idiopathic 2
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Clinical Trial Locations for Valium

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Valium
Location Trials
United States 33
United Kingdom 2
Canada 2
Italy 1
Israel 1
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Valium
Location Trials
Maryland 5
New York 5
Connecticut 3
California 3
Massachusetts 2
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Clinical Trial Progress for Valium

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Valium
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 5
Phase 3 2
Phase 2/Phase 3 1
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Valium
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 18
Recruiting 5
Terminated 3
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Valium

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Valium
Sponsor Trials
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) 3
State University of New York - Upstate Medical University 3
Lynn Marie Trotti 2
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Valium
Sponsor Trials
Other 31
NIH 6
Industry 4
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Serving hundreds of leading biopharmaceutical companies globally:

Teva
McKesson
Chubb
Moodys
Chinese Patent Office
Federal Trade Commission
Cipla
US Army
Mallinckrodt

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