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Last Updated: October 17, 2019

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR TORADOL

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Clinical Trials for Toradol

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00006070 Etanercept (Enbrel) to Treat Pain and Swelling After Third Molar Extraction Completed National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Phase 2 2000-07-01 This study will evaluate the effects of the anti-inflammatory drug etanercept (Enbrel) on relieving pain and swelling after oral surgery. The Food and Drug Administration has approved Enbrel for treating symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, including pain. Healthy volunteers 16 to 35 years of age who require third molar (wisdom teeth) extractions may be eligible for this study. Participants must not be allergic to aspirin or to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Candidates will be screened for eligibility with a medical history and oral examination, including X-rays if needed. Participation in the study requires four clinic visits: two for surgery and two for follow-up: Visit 1: Patients will have ultrasound pictures taken to measure cheek size. One hour before surgery, they will receive a dose of either 25 milligrams (mg) of Enbrel; 15 mg of the standard pain medicine Toradol; or a placebo (salt-water) through an arm vein. A local injection of an anesthetic (lidocaine) will be given before surgery to numb the mouth, and a sedative (Versed) will be infused through a vein to induce sleepiness. When the anesthetic takes effect, a small piece of tissue will be removed from the inside of the cheek, and then the upper and lower molars on one side of the mouth will be extracted. After surgery, a small piece of tubing will be placed in the lower extraction site, from which samples will be collected to measure chemicals involved in pain and inflammation. Patients will stay in the clinic for 4 hours after surgery while the anesthetic wears off and will complete pain questionnaires during that time. If, an hour after surgery, patients have pain that is not relieved by the treatment given before surgery, they may receive acetaminophen (Tylenol) and codeine for pain. Another biopsy will be taken (under local anesthetic) from the inside of the cheek when pain occurs or at the end of the 4-hour observation period. The tubing then will be removed and the patient discharged with Tylenol and codeine for pain. Visit 2: Patients will return to the clinic in the morning 48 hours after the oral surgery for a 1- to 2-hour visit. They will fill out questionnaires, undergo ultrasound imaging of both cheeks and have another biopsy taken from the inside of the cheek on the operated side. Visits 3 and 4: Three weeks after the first surgery patients will schedule extraction of the two wisdom teeth on the other side of the mouth, and the procedures for visits 1 and 2 will be repeated.
NCT00008476 Capsaicin to Control Pain Following Third Molar Extraction Completed National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Phase 2 2001-01-01 This study will test the effectiveness of the drug capsaicin in controlling pain after third molar (wisdom tooth) extraction. Capsaicin, the ingredient in chili peppers that makes them "hot," belongs to a class of drugs called vanilloids, which have been found to temporarily inactivate pain-sensing nerves. Healthy normal volunteers between 16 and 40 years of age who require third molar (wisdom tooth) extraction may be eligible for this study. Participants will undergo the following procedures in three visits: Visit 1: Patients will have touch (sensory) testing by the following three methods: 1) a warm sensor applied to the gums and the patient will rate when they first feel heat and when the heat feels painful; 2) the bristles of a small paint brush will be gently stroked across the gums, and the patient will say whether it feels painful; 3) a light touch will be applied to the gums with a small needle, and the patient will rate the pain intensity following the touch. After testing, patients will be numbed with a local anesthetic (bupivacaine) and then capsaicin or placebo (an inactive solution) will be injected next to the tooth. The tooth then will be extracted one day later. Visit 2: Patients will return to the clinic after 24 hours to repeat the same type of sensory testing. After testing, patients will be sedated and numbed with a local anesthetic (lidocaine) and given an intravenous injection of either saline or ketorolac (30 mg). After the extraction, pain ratings will be recorded every 20 minutes, for up to 6 hours. During this time, patients will be monitored for numbness, pain, side effects and vital signs (heart rate, blood pressure, respiration, etc.). Those who request pain medicine will receive acetaminophen and codeine. Patients will be required to stay for up to 3 more hours after this and then they will then be discharged with pain medicine. Visit 3: Patients will return to the clinic after another 48 hours to repeat the same sensory testing. Remaining wisdom teeth will be removed "off-study" at least three weeks following the first visit.
NCT00088686 Capsaicin to Control Pain Following Third Molar Extraction Completed National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Phase 2 2004-07-01 Capsaicin to Control Pain Following Third Molar Extraction Summary: This study will test the effectiveness of the drug capsaicin in controlling pain after third molar (wisdom tooth) extraction. Capsaicin, the ingredient in chili peppers that makes them "hot," belongs to a class of drugs called vanilloids, which have been found to temporarily inactivate pain-sensing nerves. If capsaicin alleviates pain in dental surgery, it may have potential for use in many types of surgery and painful illnesses. Healthy normal volunteers between 16 and 40 years of age who require third molar (wisdom tooth) extraction may be eligible for this study. Participants undergo the following procedures in three visits: Visit 1 Patients have touch (sensory) testing inside the mouth using three methods: 1) applying a temperature probe onto the gums and having the patient rate how warm it is; 2) applying a gentle stroke across the gums with the bristles of a small paint brush and having the patient say whether or not it feels painful; and 3) applying a light touch to the gums with a small needle and having the patient rate the pain intensity following the touch. Following touch testing, the patient's mouth is numbed with an anesthetic and a small piece of gum tissue next to the lower wisdom tooth is removed (biopsied). Then, a small amount of either capsaicin or placebo (saline, or salt water) is injected next to the wisdom tooth. Visit 2 Following repeat the touch testing, patients are sedated with an injection of midazolam. They then have another biopsy under local anesthesia on the same side of the mouth as the first biopsy. Their mouth is again numbed with an anesthetic, and they are given either a pain-relieving medicine called Toradol or a placebo injected into the arm. One lower wisdom tooth is then extracted. After the extraction, pain ratings are recorded every 20 minutes for up to 6 hours. During this time, patients are monitored for vital signs, numbness, pain, and side effects. Patients who request pain-relief medication are given acetaminophen and codeine. At the end of the study, they are discharged from the clinic and given acetaminophen and codeine to take at home, as instructed. They are provided a pain diary to record pain ratings and any adverse reactions that might occur until the last visit. Visit 3 Patients return for a follow-up evaluation 48 hours after discharge from the clinic. At the end of the evaluation, they are discharged home with flurbiprofen for pain relief. Remaining wisdom teeth are removed "off-study" no sooner than 1 week following the first visit.
NCT00115336 Ketorolac Versus Ibuprofen to Treat Painful Episodes of Sickle Cell Disease Terminated National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Phase 4 2005-01-01 The purpose of this study is to compare ketorolac, a potent, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), with ibuprofen, a commonly used NSAID, for the treatment of the painful crisis of sickle cell disease (SCD).
NCT00115336 Ketorolac Versus Ibuprofen to Treat Painful Episodes of Sickle Cell Disease Terminated University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Phase 4 2005-01-01 The purpose of this study is to compare ketorolac, a potent, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), with ibuprofen, a commonly used NSAID, for the treatment of the painful crisis of sickle cell disease (SCD).
NCT00115752 Genetic Basis For Variation In NSAID Analgesia In A Clinical Model Of Acute Pain Completed National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) Phase 2 2005-06-01 This study will evaluate how genetic makeup contributes to the variation in people regarding their sensitivity to and experience of pain. Scientists believe that differences in information found in genes may explain why an analgesic drug, that is, one that treats pain, works effectively for some people but not for others. The study will explore pain that is acute (fast and short period). Knowledge gained from this ongoing study may permit development of an individualized analgesic drug prescription. Patients ages 16 to 35 who are in good health and have been referred for removal of impacted wisdom teeth; who are not allergic to aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (known as NSAIDs), sulfites, or certain anesthetics; who are not pregnant or nursing; and who are willing to have a biopsy before and after dental surgery are eligible for this study. Patients will come to the clinic for one test visit and one treatment visit. During the first visit, a questionnaire will evaluate patients' psychological state, including mood and depression. There will be a clinical examination of their wisdom teeth. A blood sample of 10 milliliters (about 0.4 ounces) will be collected from the forearm to provide DNA material containing genes stored in cells. The primary genetic analysis will be done at NIH, although the DNA collected might also be sent to a laboratory outside NIH. DNA samples will be coded so that names of patients cannot be traced. During the second visit, two of the patients' lower wisdom teeth will be removed. Patients will be given a local anesthetic in the mouth and a sedative given through a vein in the arm. While the mouth is numb, a small piece of tissue will be removed from inside the cheek, near the wisdom tooth. It is the first biopsy. After the two wisdom teeth are removed, a small piece of tubing will be placed into both sides of the mouth where the teeth were removed. Every 20 minutes, for the next 3 hours, the researchers will collect inflammatory fluid from the tubing, to measure the chemicals thought to cause pain and swelling. Also every 20 minutes, patients will rate the pain they feel by answering questions. If there is pain before 3 hours following surgery, they will receive a dose of fentanyl to relieve moderate to severe pain. A second biopsy will occur 3 hours after surgery, to measure changes in chemicals produced in response to surgery. Immediately afterward, patients will receive 30 mg of ketorolac (Toradol) whether or not pain is felt. They will answer questionnaires about pain for 3 hours after receiving the drug, to rate how well it works. They will stay at the clinic up to 6 hours after the surgery. If pain is not relieved with ketorolac, patients will receive a one-time dose of tramadol, a pain medication for moderate to severe pain. After the study procedures are completed, patients will receive pain medication for pain after surgery. Patients will be monitored closely, because all drugs have side effects. Ketorolac is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, one that may cause gastrointestinal upset. Fentanyl is a powerful narcotic drug that is safe at the dosage used in this study, but stomach upset, dizziness, and breathing trouble may occur. Also, risks from the biopsy include discomfort from injecting the numbing medicine, infection, and bleeding. There may be discomfort from the sedative injected into the vein, and there may be bruising. Benefits from participating are having wisdom teeth removed at no cost as well as close monitoring before and after surgery. There are no plans to give patients the results of genetic tests or questionnaires. Years of research may be needed before such information has the chance to become meaningful.
NCT00121563 Evaluation of a TNF-Alpha Modulator for Clinical and Molecular Indicators of Analgesic Effect Completed National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) Phase 2 2005-07-01 This study will evaluate the role of thalidomide, a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha modulator, on severe inflammation and relief of pain following extraction of wisdom teeth. TNFs are substances that affect the pathways of pain. This study involves an experimental group in which patients will be given thalidomide or a placebo (an inactive substance); a negative control group receiving the medication diazepam or a placebo; and a positive control group receiving diazepam or ibuprofen. Patients who are males ages 16 to 35, who are not allergic to aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (known as NSAIDs), sulfites, or certain anesthetics, and who in good health may be eligible for this study. Females are not eligible, owing to the risks that thalidomide presents to unborn children. To minimize the risk of fetal malformations, male patients who participate must use a condom during sexual intercourse for 4 weeks following the study and must not donate blood for 4 weeks. The medications used in the study will be given 1 hour before surgery. Then after the wisdom teeth are removed, a small piece of tubing will be placed into both sides of the patient's mouth where the teeth were removed. Every 20 minutes, for the next 6 hours, the researchers will collect inflammatory fluid from the tubing, to measure for changes in anti-inflammatory action. If they request pain relievers, patients will receive the medication ketorolac (Toradol), used for short-term treatment of moderately severe acute pain. Side effects of thalidomide include fatigue, dizziness, and rash. The use of ibuprofen and ketorolac may include the risk of gastrointestinal ulcers and bleeding. Diazepam can cause involuntary muscle movements and drowsiness, as well as dizziness lasting for up to 24 hours after it has been used as sedation. Patients will be instructed not to try to walk alone or to try to drive a vehicle during that period. Other risks related to participation in this study include those usually experienced with removal of wisdom teeth-that is, pain and swelling, bruising from insertion of the sedative into a vein (if needed), possible infection at the extraction site, prolonged bleeding, and numbness. Benefits from participating are having wisdom teeth removed at no cost as well as close monitoring before and after surgery. Results from the study may help people in the future by improving the management of pain following surgery.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for Toradol

Condition Name

Condition Name for Toradol
Intervention Trials
Pain, Postoperative 13
Pain 10
Postoperative Pain 7
Opioid Use 5
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Toradol
Intervention Trials
Pain, Postoperative 28
Osteoarthritis 6
Headache 5
Osteoarthritis, Knee 4
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Clinical Trial Locations for Toradol

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Toradol
Location Trials
United States 68
Denmark 3
Norway 2
Canada 2
Italy 2
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Toradol
Location Trials
New York 16
Maryland 6
Michigan 5
Ohio 5
Texas 5
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Clinical Trial Progress for Toradol

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Toradol
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 50
Phase 3 7
Phase 2/Phase 3 2
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Toradol
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 34
Recruiting 32
Not yet recruiting 13
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Toradol

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Toradol
Sponsor Trials
Maimonides Medical Center 3
Henry Ford Health System 3
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) 3
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Toradol
Sponsor Trials
Other 102
NIH 7
Industry 6
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