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Last Updated: October 27, 2020

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR SIROLIMUS

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505(b)(2) Clinical Trials for Sirolimus

This table shows clinical trials for potential 505(b)(2) applications. See the next table for all clinical trials
Trial Type Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
New Combination NCT00565773 Belatacept Post Depletional Repopulation to Facilitate Tolerance Active, not recruiting Bristol-Myers Squibb Phase 2 2007-12-01 Acute rejection is a common problem after a kidney transplant. Rejection can occur when the kidney recipient's immune system tries to attack (or reject) the new kidney. Rejection typically most often develops in the first few months after a transplant. This single center study will seek to determine if a new combination of anti-rejection medications, including the recently FDA approved drug called Belatacept, is better than the current standard anti-rejection drug regimen at preventing rejection. Also to be determined will be whether the new combination of drugs will allow participants to wean off their oral anti-rejection medications over time. This study will test the safety and effectiveness of a new investigational drug combination using alemtuzumab, belatacept, and sirolimus when given with or without donor bone marrow. This combination of medicines has not been tested before in humans. Alemtuzumab (Campath) is approved for use in some types of white blood cell cancers, but is considered investigational in transplant patients. Belatacept is now FDA approved and is being studied in transplant patients. Sirolimus (Rapamune) is approved for use in transplant patients, but its use with belatacept and alemtuzumab is investigational. In the initial 20 subjects enrolled in the study, half tested whether an infusion of bone marrow from the kidney donor would improve the effect of these drugs. This bone marrow infusion was also considered investigational. Enrollment of 20 additional subjects was begun in January, 2013. The donor bone marrow infusion has been eliminated. Enrollment was open to primary living and deceased donor kidney recipients. Enrollment is closed as of 8/12/2014. Funding Source - FDA OOPD
New Combination NCT00565773 Belatacept Post Depletional Repopulation to Facilitate Tolerance Active, not recruiting Emory University Phase 2 2007-12-01 Acute rejection is a common problem after a kidney transplant. Rejection can occur when the kidney recipient's immune system tries to attack (or reject) the new kidney. Rejection typically most often develops in the first few months after a transplant. This single center study will seek to determine if a new combination of anti-rejection medications, including the recently FDA approved drug called Belatacept, is better than the current standard anti-rejection drug regimen at preventing rejection. Also to be determined will be whether the new combination of drugs will allow participants to wean off their oral anti-rejection medications over time. This study will test the safety and effectiveness of a new investigational drug combination using alemtuzumab, belatacept, and sirolimus when given with or without donor bone marrow. This combination of medicines has not been tested before in humans. Alemtuzumab (Campath) is approved for use in some types of white blood cell cancers, but is considered investigational in transplant patients. Belatacept is now FDA approved and is being studied in transplant patients. Sirolimus (Rapamune) is approved for use in transplant patients, but its use with belatacept and alemtuzumab is investigational. In the initial 20 subjects enrolled in the study, half tested whether an infusion of bone marrow from the kidney donor would improve the effect of these drugs. This bone marrow infusion was also considered investigational. Enrollment of 20 additional subjects was begun in January, 2013. The donor bone marrow infusion has been eliminated. Enrollment was open to primary living and deceased donor kidney recipients. Enrollment is closed as of 8/12/2014. Funding Source - FDA OOPD
New Indication NCT03877809 Testing SIROLIMUS in Beta-thalassemia Transfusion Dependent Patients Not yet recruiting Università degli Studi di Ferrara Phase 2 2019-04-01 Beta-thalassemias are hereditary blood disorders caused by reduced or absent synthesis of hemoglobin beta chains, with variable outcomes ranging from severe anemia to clinically asymptomatic individuals. Treatment is symptomatic and thalassemia is a major unmet medical need. Survival is increased, even in patients needing transfusions, in comparison with a few years ago, but the quality of life is poor for many patients. In some patients, an anomalous expression of gamma-globin genes has been observed, with a consequent rise in Fetal Hemoglobin levels. The patients displaying a clinical phenotype known as HPFH (Hereditary Persistence of Fetal Hemoglobin) exhibit a positive clinical status. To mimick HPFH, several compounds able to induce expression of embryofetal hemoglobins (HbF) have been evaluated. Within this framework, sirolimus is particularly interesting as an inducer of HbF. It has been used for many years for different indications and the available preclinical evidence warrant the start of a clinical development plan in thalassemia. We propose a pilot clinical trial in beta-thalassemia patients, designed to evaluate the effect of sirolimus on several parameters related to red blood cell status and to the level of HbF in particular, as a first step for the full clinical development in this new indication.
New Indication NCT03877809 Testing SIROLIMUS in Beta-thalassemia Transfusion Dependent Patients Not yet recruiting Rare Partners srl Impresa Sociale Phase 2 2019-04-01 Beta-thalassemias are hereditary blood disorders caused by reduced or absent synthesis of hemoglobin beta chains, with variable outcomes ranging from severe anemia to clinically asymptomatic individuals. Treatment is symptomatic and thalassemia is a major unmet medical need. Survival is increased, even in patients needing transfusions, in comparison with a few years ago, but the quality of life is poor for many patients. In some patients, an anomalous expression of gamma-globin genes has been observed, with a consequent rise in Fetal Hemoglobin levels. The patients displaying a clinical phenotype known as HPFH (Hereditary Persistence of Fetal Hemoglobin) exhibit a positive clinical status. To mimick HPFH, several compounds able to induce expression of embryofetal hemoglobins (HbF) have been evaluated. Within this framework, sirolimus is particularly interesting as an inducer of HbF. It has been used for many years for different indications and the available preclinical evidence warrant the start of a clinical development plan in thalassemia. We propose a pilot clinical trial in beta-thalassemia patients, designed to evaluate the effect of sirolimus on several parameters related to red blood cell status and to the level of HbF in particular, as a first step for the full clinical development in this new indication.
New Indication NCT04247750 Testing SIROLIMUS in Beta-thalassemia Transfusion Dependent Patients (THALA-RAP) Not yet recruiting Rare Partners srl Impresa Sociale Phase 2 2020-02-28 In β-thalassaemia and Sickle Cell Disease (SCD), a significant production of fetal haemoglobin (HbF) may reduce the severity of clinical course and reactivation of γ-globin gene expression in adulthood. HbF induction is one of the best strategies to ameliorate the characteristic symptoms of these diseases. Hydroxyurea (HU) is the only medication, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, inducing HbF. However, treatments with HU induce sufficient HbF levels in only half of the patients, and side effects including leukopenia and neutropenia are frequently reported. Therefore, novel therapeutic inducers must be identified to develop a personalized treatment in β-thalassaemia and sickle cell anaemia. The availability of new treatments depends on drugs already approved for other indications, and on pharmacokinetics and pharmacovigilance already assessed. Rapamycin (as Sirolimus) is an immunosuppressant agent, approved by the FDA for acute rejection prevention in renal transplant recipients. The ability of this drug to induce γ-globin gene expression in erythroleukemia cell line and erythroid precursors cells (ErPCs) in ß-thalassaemia patients is already known. A clinical investigation on the effects of sirolimus in ß-Thalassaemia aims to evaluate several parameters related to red blood cell status and HbF levels and is a first step for the full clinical development in this new indication.
New Indication NCT04247750 Testing SIROLIMUS in Beta-thalassemia Transfusion Dependent Patients (THALA-RAP) Not yet recruiting Università degli Studi di Ferrara Phase 2 2020-02-28 In β-thalassaemia and Sickle Cell Disease (SCD), a significant production of fetal haemoglobin (HbF) may reduce the severity of clinical course and reactivation of γ-globin gene expression in adulthood. HbF induction is one of the best strategies to ameliorate the characteristic symptoms of these diseases. Hydroxyurea (HU) is the only medication, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, inducing HbF. However, treatments with HU induce sufficient HbF levels in only half of the patients, and side effects including leukopenia and neutropenia are frequently reported. Therefore, novel therapeutic inducers must be identified to develop a personalized treatment in β-thalassaemia and sickle cell anaemia. The availability of new treatments depends on drugs already approved for other indications, and on pharmacokinetics and pharmacovigilance already assessed. Rapamycin (as Sirolimus) is an immunosuppressant agent, approved by the FDA for acute rejection prevention in renal transplant recipients. The ability of this drug to induce γ-globin gene expression in erythroleukemia cell line and erythroid precursors cells (ErPCs) in ß-thalassaemia patients is already known. A clinical investigation on the effects of sirolimus in ß-Thalassaemia aims to evaluate several parameters related to red blood cell status and HbF levels and is a first step for the full clinical development in this new indication.
>Trial Type >Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

All Clinical Trials for Sirolimus

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00001984 Effectiveness of the Investigational Drug Campath-1H in Preventing Rejection of Transplanted Kidneys Completed National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Phase 2 1999-11-01 This protocol will test a humanized monoclonal antibody known as Campath-1H for its ability to induce a state of permanent allograft acceptance, or tolerance, when administered in combination with a brief course of the immunosuppressive drug deoxyspergualin (DSG) at the time of human renal allotransplantation. Campath-1H is specific for the common lymphocyte and monocyte antigen CD52. Its administration temporarily depletes mature lymphocytes and some monocytes without altering neutrophils or hematopoietic stem cells. Deoxyspergualin inhibits the NFkB pathway thus preventing monocyte and macrophage activation. Recipients of living or cadaveric donor kidneys will be treated with one dose of Campath-1H prior to transplantation to insure that peripheral depletion is achieved at the time of graft reperfusion. Three subsequent doses of Campath-1H will be administered on the first, third and fifth days after the transplant to deplete passenger donor leukocytes and residual recipient cells that mobilize in response to the allograft. In addition, patients will be treated with DSG for 14 days beginning on the day prior to surgery. This trial expands on pilot studies at the NIH of 15 patients in which Campath was given alone at the time of transplantation. In those studies, excellent peripheral depletion occurred after just one dose of Campath though central depletion required additional dosing. This allowed for greatly reduced immunosuppression to be used to prevent rejection, but to date, all patients have required some immunosuppressive medication. It is hoped that the addition of DSG will eliminate the need for long-term immunosuppression. Patients will be followed closely in the post transplant period. If patients experience rejection, they will be treated with methylprednisolone and have immunosuppression added using sirolimus as the predominant immunosuppressive agent. In the previous phase of this study without DSG, this maneuver has in all cases been successful in returning the allograft to normal function. In addition to evaluating graft function following transplantation, this protocol will also characterize and evaluate the function of the immune system and the composition of the T cell repertoire following the administration of Campath-1H and DSG, and during immune system recovery after transplantation.
NCT00002790 Prevention of Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Who Are Receiving a Bone Marrow Transplant Withdrawn National Cancer Institute (NCI) Phase 1/Phase 2 1996-03-01 RATIONALE: Bone marrow transplantation may be able to replace immune cells that were destroyed by chemotherapy used to kill tumor cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells can make an immune response against the body's normal tissues. Treatment with sirolimus, methotrexate, and cyclosporine may prevent this from happening. PURPOSE: Phase I/II trial to study the effectiveness of sirolimus plus methotrexate and cyclosporine in preventing graft-versus-host disease in patients with hematologic malignancies who are receiving a bone marrow transplant.
NCT00002790 Prevention of Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Who Are Receiving a Bone Marrow Transplant Withdrawn Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Phase 1/Phase 2 1996-03-01 RATIONALE: Bone marrow transplantation may be able to replace immune cells that were destroyed by chemotherapy used to kill tumor cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells can make an immune response against the body's normal tissues. Treatment with sirolimus, methotrexate, and cyclosporine may prevent this from happening. PURPOSE: Phase I/II trial to study the effectiveness of sirolimus plus methotrexate and cyclosporine in preventing graft-versus-host disease in patients with hematologic malignancies who are receiving a bone marrow transplant.
NCT00005113 A Study to Compare Treatment With Sirolimus Versus Standard Treatment in Patients Who Have Received a Kidney Transplant Terminated Boston Children’s Hospital Phase 3 1999-07-01 The purpose of this study is to compare treatment with the new drug sirolimus (SRL) versus the standard treatment with cyclosporine (CsA) or tacrolimus in children who have received kidney transplants. SRL is a new medication that may prevent the body's immune system from rejecting organ transplants. After receiving a kidney transplant, the body recognizes the donated kidney as a foreign invader and triggers the immune system to attack the kidney. This can lead to rejection of the new kidney and a failed transplant. To help reduce the risk of kidney rejection, transplant patients are given immunosuppressant drugs, which reduce the body's normal immune response and allow the transplanted organ to function. CsA or tacrolimus are two drugs that are often given to transplant patients. However, these are powerful drugs, and it can cause serious side effects and put a patient at increased risk for infections. SRL is a new drug that has been shown to reduce a transplant patient's chance of rejecting a new kidney, without serious side effects. This study is necessary to test the safety and effectiveness of SRL in children.
NCT00006178 Sirolimus and Thymoglobulin to Prevent Kidney Transplant Rejection Completed National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Phase 2 2000-08-01 This study will test the safety and effectiveness of two drugs, Sirolimus and Thymoglobulin, for preventing rejection of transplanted kidneys. Standard anti-rejection therapy uses a combination of drugs, such as cyclosporine, tacrolimus, azathioprine, steroids, and others, that are taken daily for life. However, even with this daily therapy, more than half of kidney recipients slowly reject their transplant within 10 years. Both Thymoglobulin, an antibody, and Sirolimus, an anti-rejection drug, prevent rejection by lowering the response of the immune system to the transplanted organ. Thymoglobulin is given in the pre- and postoperative period, and Sirolimus is taken long term. Patients who receive a kidney transplant at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center are eligible for this study. Candidates will be screened with a medical history, physical examination, and blood and urine tests. Participants will undergo a kidney transplant. Before the surgery, a central line (intravenous catheter), through which blood and medicine can be given, is placed in the neck or chest. Patients may also undergo leukapheresis, a procedure for collecting white blood cells. The cells can be stored for transfusion later if white cell counts drop following Thymoglobulin treatment. For this procedure, blood is drawn from a needle placed in the arm and flows into a machine that separates the blood components by spinning. The white cells are collected in a bag and the red cells and plasma are returned through a second needle in the other arm. Thymoglobulin will be given intravenously the day before the transplant and days 1 through 9 after the operation. Sirolimus will be taken by mouth, mixed with water or orange juice. Sirolimus therapy starts the day of the transplant and continues for life. Follow-up study visits will be scheduled weekly for the first month after the transplant, then every 6 months for 1 year and then once a year for 4 years. Procedures during these visits may include blood and urine tests, physical examination, and check of vital signs (i.e., blood pressure, heart rate, breathing rate, temperature). Kidney biopsies (removal of a small piece of tissue for examination under the microscope) will be done at 2 weeks, 1 month and 6 months after surgery and then yearly for 4 years to check for any damage to the kidney. In addition, a local doctor will do routine laboratory tests 2 to 3 times a week for the first 2 to 3 months aft...
NCT00014911 Islet Transplantation for Type 1 Diabetes Completed Immune Tolerance Network (ITN) Phase 2 2001-04-01 The purpose of this study is to test whether the islet cell transplantation procedures and results from a previous study in Edmonton, Canada, can be repeated. The study also is designed to learn more about diabetes control using islet cell transplantation. This is a Phase I/II study (a study that examines effectiveness and looks for side effects). The transplanting of islet cells has been studied in Type 1 diabetic patients whose blood sugar levels will not stay normal, despite intensive insulin therapy. A recent study conducted in Edmonton, Canada, was able to demonstrate that islet transplantation led to insulin independence in a majority of the patients treated. This study extends the results obtained from the Edmonton study, which used islet transplantation in Type 1 diabetic patients with steroid-free immunosuppression.
NCT00014911 Islet Transplantation for Type 1 Diabetes Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 2 2001-04-01 The purpose of this study is to test whether the islet cell transplantation procedures and results from a previous study in Edmonton, Canada, can be repeated. The study also is designed to learn more about diabetes control using islet cell transplantation. This is a Phase I/II study (a study that examines effectiveness and looks for side effects). The transplanting of islet cells has been studied in Type 1 diabetic patients whose blood sugar levels will not stay normal, despite intensive insulin therapy. A recent study conducted in Edmonton, Canada, was able to demonstrate that islet transplantation led to insulin independence in a majority of the patients treated. This study extends the results obtained from the Edmonton study, which used islet transplantation in Type 1 diabetic patients with steroid-free immunosuppression.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for Sirolimus

Condition Name

Condition Name for Sirolimus
Intervention Trials
Kidney Transplantation 43
Leukemia 22
Lymphoma 18
Myelodysplastic Syndromes 17
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Sirolimus
Intervention Trials
Graft vs Host Disease 55
Leukemia 52
Myelodysplastic Syndromes 34
Preleukemia 34
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Clinical Trial Locations for Sirolimus

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Sirolimus
Location Trials
United States 871
Canada 46
Germany 29
Italy 29
Spain 28
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Sirolimus
Location Trials
Maryland 73
California 70
Florida 53
Massachusetts 50
Pennsylvania 49
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Clinical Trial Progress for Sirolimus

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Sirolimus
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 106
Phase 3 53
Phase 2/Phase 3 21
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Sirolimus
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 213
Recruiting 129
Not yet recruiting 72
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Sirolimus

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Sirolimus
Sponsor Trials
National Cancer Institute (NCI) 81
Wyeth is now a wholly owned subsidiary of Pfizer 43
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) 23
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Sirolimus
Sponsor Trials
Other 617
Industry 192
NIH 161
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