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Last Updated: October 18, 2021

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR SECNIDAZOLE

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All Clinical Trials for Secnidazole

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT01019083 ↗ Studies of Immune Responses to Orally Administered Vaccines in Developing Country Completed Göteborg University Phase 1/Phase 2 2008-02-01 The efficacy and immunogenicity of enteric vaccines have generally been found to be lower in children in the developed than in the developing countries. This has been observed with vaccines against cholera rotavirus, ETEC and typhoid vaccines. There are a number of factors that may contribute to such differences in vaccine "take rates" in children, e.g. breast feeding and nutritional status of the children might influence their immunogenicity and efficacy. Thus, breast feeding of newborn and young infants may adversely influence the immune response to vaccination, which might have more pronounced effect in developing than in developed countries. Breastfeeding has also been shown to interfere with the serum immune responses to rotavirus vaccine although this effect could be overcome by administering three rather than one dose of the oral rotavirus vaccine. Our recent study of Dukoral in Bangladeshi children aged 18 months or younger has shown that the response rates and the magnitude of responses improved when breast milk was temporarily withheld . Thus, administration of vaccines may have to be adjusted when given to breast fed children. Another factor that may affect the immunogenicity is the effect of zinc. Previous studies have shown that zinc enhances the immune response to cholera vaccine in participants > 2 years of age , a recent study also observed a similar effect in infants. In this research project, we plan to study a number of different factors that might influence the immunogenicity of the two licensed oral model vaccines, specifically the inactivated killed oral cholera vaccine, Dukoral, and the live oral typhoid vaccine, Ty21a. We will also identify strategies that might improve the immunogenicity of the vaccines. The main objective of our study is to identify immunization regimens that may improve the immunogenicity of the vaccines in young children, which could be subsequently in field trials in Bangladesh and other developing countries. Specifically, we will determine if: (i) interventions identified to enhance immune responses to Dukoral, including zinc supplementation, could also enhance the immune responses to Ty21a; (ii) these two vaccines are able to induce both acute and memory B and T cell responses, (iii) treatment with antiparasitic drugs prior to immunization could modulate the immune responses to cholera and typhoid vaccines; and (iv) examine if arsenic exerts a suppressive effect on the immunogenicity of these vaccines.
NCT01019083 ↗ Studies of Immune Responses to Orally Administered Vaccines in Developing Country Completed International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh Phase 1/Phase 2 2008-02-01 The efficacy and immunogenicity of enteric vaccines have generally been found to be lower in children in the developed than in the developing countries. This has been observed with vaccines against cholera rotavirus, ETEC and typhoid vaccines. There are a number of factors that may contribute to such differences in vaccine "take rates" in children, e.g. breast feeding and nutritional status of the children might influence their immunogenicity and efficacy. Thus, breast feeding of newborn and young infants may adversely influence the immune response to vaccination, which might have more pronounced effect in developing than in developed countries. Breastfeeding has also been shown to interfere with the serum immune responses to rotavirus vaccine although this effect could be overcome by administering three rather than one dose of the oral rotavirus vaccine. Our recent study of Dukoral in Bangladeshi children aged 18 months or younger has shown that the response rates and the magnitude of responses improved when breast milk was temporarily withheld . Thus, administration of vaccines may have to be adjusted when given to breast fed children. Another factor that may affect the immunogenicity is the effect of zinc. Previous studies have shown that zinc enhances the immune response to cholera vaccine in participants > 2 years of age , a recent study also observed a similar effect in infants. In this research project, we plan to study a number of different factors that might influence the immunogenicity of the two licensed oral model vaccines, specifically the inactivated killed oral cholera vaccine, Dukoral, and the live oral typhoid vaccine, Ty21a. We will also identify strategies that might improve the immunogenicity of the vaccines. The main objective of our study is to identify immunization regimens that may improve the immunogenicity of the vaccines in young children, which could be subsequently in field trials in Bangladesh and other developing countries. Specifically, we will determine if: (i) interventions identified to enhance immune responses to Dukoral, including zinc supplementation, could also enhance the immune responses to Ty21a; (ii) these two vaccines are able to induce both acute and memory B and T cell responses, (iii) treatment with antiparasitic drugs prior to immunization could modulate the immune responses to cholera and typhoid vaccines; and (iv) examine if arsenic exerts a suppressive effect on the immunogenicity of these vaccines.
NCT02111629 ↗ Safety and Clinical and Microbiological Efficacy of the Combination of Fluconazole and Secnidazole for the Treatment of Symptomatic Vaginal Discharge Completed Universidad Nacional de Colombia Phase 3 2012-05-01 Genital tract infections (GTIs) have increased in the past decade and there is an association between sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and other infections like bacterial vaginosis (BV), with the HIV transmission. BV and Candida are the most common causes of vaginal infections in symptomatic women, the prevalence of BV being 22-50% and the prevalence of Candida 17-39%. In an effort to reduce the transmission of GTIs, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a syndromic diagnostic approach as a low cost alternative in places with no access to laboratory diagnostic tests. Justification. In patients with syndrome of vaginal discharge, an effective treatment against Candida albicans, Trichomonas vaginalis, and bacterial vaginosis is adviced, therefore, for syndromic management of symptomatic vaginal discharge the combination of fluconazole and secnidazole could be used. No studies evaluating this combination were found in the literature reviewed. Objectives: To describe the safety and the clinical and microbiological efficacy of a single oral dose of a combined treatment with secnidazole + fluconazole for the syndromic management of symptomatic vaginal discharge. Methods: Design: open label, uncontrolled clinical trial to estimate clinical efficacy and safety of the combination of fluconazole and secnidazole for the treatment of symptomatic vaginal discharge. The participants will be sexually active women with lower genital tract symptoms (leukorrhea, itching, burning, pain, foul-smelling vaginal discharge, or urethral symptoms) compatible with symptomatic vaginal discharge syndrome. The study will be conducted in an outpatient service of a hospital in Bogota, Colombia. Given the descriptive character of the study, no a priori hypothesis is considered. A consecutive convenience sample size of 100 symptomatic patients is calculated. The statistical analysis will be performed with STATA 11.0 software (College Station, Texas, USA). Simple and relative frequencies and measures of central tendency and dispersion appropriate for the distribution of the variables will be calculated. The study has been submitted and approved by the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Medicine of the National University of Colombia and the Institutional Review Board of the participating institution. All women must sign a written informed consent form agreeing to voluntarily participate in the study.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for Secnidazole

Condition Name

Condition Name for Secnidazole
Intervention Trials
Vaginal Discharge 1
Typhoid 1
Trichomonas Infection 1
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Secnidazole
Intervention Trials
Vaginosis, Bacterial 3
Vaginal Diseases 3
Typhoid Fever 1
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Clinical Trial Locations for Secnidazole

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Secnidazole
Location Trials
United States 36
Colombia 1
Bangladesh 1
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Secnidazole
Location Trials
Florida 3
Tennessee 3
South Carolina 2
New Jersey 2
North Carolina 2
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Clinical Trial Progress for Secnidazole

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Secnidazole
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 1
Phase 3 3
Phase 2/Phase 3 1
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Secnidazole
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Recruiting 3
Completed 3
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Secnidazole

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Secnidazole
Sponsor Trials
Lupin Research Inc 2
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh 1
Göteborg University 1
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Secnidazole
Sponsor Trials
Industry 4
Other 4
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