Remove trial restrictions ▶ Start for $1

Serving leading biopharmaceutical companies globally:

McKesson
Boehringer Ingelheim
Express Scripts
AstraZeneca
Johnson and Johnson
Harvard Business School

Last Updated: December 3, 2022

CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR RAPAMUNE


✉ Email this page to a colleague

« Back to Dashboard

▶ Start for $1
Remove trial restrictions


505(b)(2) Clinical Trials for Rapamune

This table shows clinical trials for potential 505(b)(2) applications. See the next table for all clinical trials
Trial Type Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
New Combination NCT00565773 ↗ Belatacept Post Depletional Repopulation to Facilitate Tolerance Completed Bristol-Myers Squibb Phase 2 2007-12-01 Acute rejection is a common problem after a kidney transplant. Rejection can occur when the kidney recipient's immune system tries to attack (or reject) the new kidney. Rejection typically most often develops in the first few months after a transplant. This single center study will seek to determine if a new combination of anti-rejection medications, including the recently FDA approved drug called Belatacept, is better than the current standard anti-rejection drug regimen at preventing rejection. Also to be determined will be whether the new combination of drugs will allow participants to wean off their oral anti-rejection medications over time. This study will test the safety and effectiveness of a new investigational drug combination using alemtuzumab, belatacept, and sirolimus when given with or without donor bone marrow. This combination of medicines has not been tested before in humans. Alemtuzumab (Campath) is approved for use in some types of white blood cell cancers, but is considered investigational in transplant patients. Belatacept is now FDA approved and is being studied in transplant patients. Sirolimus (Rapamune) is approved for use in transplant patients, but its use with belatacept and alemtuzumab is investigational. In the initial 20 subjects enrolled in the study, half tested whether an infusion of bone marrow from the kidney donor would improve the effect of these drugs. This bone marrow infusion was also considered investigational. Enrollment of 20 additional subjects began in January, 2013. The donor bone marrow infusion has been eliminated. Enrollment was open to primary living and deceased donor kidney recipients. Enrollment was closed as of 8/12/2014.
New Combination NCT00565773 ↗ Belatacept Post Depletional Repopulation to Facilitate Tolerance Completed Duke University Phase 2 2007-12-01 Acute rejection is a common problem after a kidney transplant. Rejection can occur when the kidney recipient's immune system tries to attack (or reject) the new kidney. Rejection typically most often develops in the first few months after a transplant. This single center study will seek to determine if a new combination of anti-rejection medications, including the recently FDA approved drug called Belatacept, is better than the current standard anti-rejection drug regimen at preventing rejection. Also to be determined will be whether the new combination of drugs will allow participants to wean off their oral anti-rejection medications over time. This study will test the safety and effectiveness of a new investigational drug combination using alemtuzumab, belatacept, and sirolimus when given with or without donor bone marrow. This combination of medicines has not been tested before in humans. Alemtuzumab (Campath) is approved for use in some types of white blood cell cancers, but is considered investigational in transplant patients. Belatacept is now FDA approved and is being studied in transplant patients. Sirolimus (Rapamune) is approved for use in transplant patients, but its use with belatacept and alemtuzumab is investigational. In the initial 20 subjects enrolled in the study, half tested whether an infusion of bone marrow from the kidney donor would improve the effect of these drugs. This bone marrow infusion was also considered investigational. Enrollment of 20 additional subjects began in January, 2013. The donor bone marrow infusion has been eliminated. Enrollment was open to primary living and deceased donor kidney recipients. Enrollment was closed as of 8/12/2014.
New Combination NCT00565773 ↗ Belatacept Post Depletional Repopulation to Facilitate Tolerance Completed Allan D Kirk, MD, PhD Phase 2 2007-12-01 Acute rejection is a common problem after a kidney transplant. Rejection can occur when the kidney recipient's immune system tries to attack (or reject) the new kidney. Rejection typically most often develops in the first few months after a transplant. This single center study will seek to determine if a new combination of anti-rejection medications, including the recently FDA approved drug called Belatacept, is better than the current standard anti-rejection drug regimen at preventing rejection. Also to be determined will be whether the new combination of drugs will allow participants to wean off their oral anti-rejection medications over time. This study will test the safety and effectiveness of a new investigational drug combination using alemtuzumab, belatacept, and sirolimus when given with or without donor bone marrow. This combination of medicines has not been tested before in humans. Alemtuzumab (Campath) is approved for use in some types of white blood cell cancers, but is considered investigational in transplant patients. Belatacept is now FDA approved and is being studied in transplant patients. Sirolimus (Rapamune) is approved for use in transplant patients, but its use with belatacept and alemtuzumab is investigational. In the initial 20 subjects enrolled in the study, half tested whether an infusion of bone marrow from the kidney donor would improve the effect of these drugs. This bone marrow infusion was also considered investigational. Enrollment of 20 additional subjects began in January, 2013. The donor bone marrow infusion has been eliminated. Enrollment was open to primary living and deceased donor kidney recipients. Enrollment was closed as of 8/12/2014.
New Combination NCT00565773 ↗ Belatacept Post Depletional Repopulation to Facilitate Tolerance Completed Emory University Phase 2 2007-12-01 Acute rejection is a common problem after a kidney transplant. Rejection can occur when the kidney recipient's immune system tries to attack (or reject) the new kidney. Rejection typically most often develops in the first few months after a transplant. This single center study will seek to determine if a new combination of anti-rejection medications, including the recently FDA approved drug called Belatacept, is better than the current standard anti-rejection drug regimen at preventing rejection. Also to be determined will be whether the new combination of drugs will allow participants to wean off their oral anti-rejection medications over time. This study will test the safety and effectiveness of a new investigational drug combination using alemtuzumab, belatacept, and sirolimus when given with or without donor bone marrow. This combination of medicines has not been tested before in humans. Alemtuzumab (Campath) is approved for use in some types of white blood cell cancers, but is considered investigational in transplant patients. Belatacept is now FDA approved and is being studied in transplant patients. Sirolimus (Rapamune) is approved for use in transplant patients, but its use with belatacept and alemtuzumab is investigational. In the initial 20 subjects enrolled in the study, half tested whether an infusion of bone marrow from the kidney donor would improve the effect of these drugs. This bone marrow infusion was also considered investigational. Enrollment of 20 additional subjects began in January, 2013. The donor bone marrow infusion has been eliminated. Enrollment was open to primary living and deceased donor kidney recipients. Enrollment was closed as of 8/12/2014.
>Trial Type >Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

All Clinical Trials for Rapamune

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00023231 ↗ Pediatric Kidney Transplant Without Calcineurin Inhibitors Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) N/A 2001-02-01 The purpose of this study is to see the effect of using drugs other than calcineurin inhibitors to improve the rate of kidney transplant failure. Kidney transplantation can help children with end-stage kidney disease. However, it has been difficult to find treatment for donor graft rejection that does not have a lot of side effects. Researchers hope to find treatments (immunosuppressants) with fewer side effects. One approach is to avoid using calcineurin inhibitors and to try a new drug known as sirolimus instead. Another is to use steroids less often. This study will test whether using sirolimus, fewer steroid treatments, MMF, and certain antibodies will improve long-term graft survival in children receiving kidney transplants from living donors.
NCT00037531 ↗ Study Evaluating Sirolimus (Rapamuneā„¢) in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients Completed Wyeth is now a wholly owned subsidiary of Pfizer Phase 3 1969-12-31 To evaluate the safety of long-term administration of sirolimus oral solution for up to 5 additional years, or until the tablet formulation is commercially available (whichever occurs first) in solid organ transplant recipients who are currently receiving sirolimus and who have completed clinical trials with sirolimus (with or without cyclosporine (CsA). To evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of long-term administration of sirolimus tablets administered for up to 5 years, or until the tablet formulation is commercially available in solid organ transplant recipients who are currently receiving sirolimus and who have completed clinical trials with sirolimus (with or without CsA) or who are currently enrolled in protocol 0468E1-306-US.
NCT00040508 ↗ Sirolimus for Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis Completed National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Phase 2 2002-06-01 This study will determine the safety and effectiveness of sirolimus (RapamuneĀ® (Registered Trademark)) in treating focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), a disease involving kidney scarring and increased protein in the urine. About one-half of patients with FSGS go on to develop end-stage kidney disease within 6 years, requiring dialysis or kidney transplant. Therapies to reduce urine protein are likely to stop the progression of renal scarring and reduce the chance of developing kidney failure. However, current treatments for FSGS, such as prednisone, cyclophosphamide, and cyclosporine, are not effective in many patients and can cause serious side effects. This study will see if sirolimus, a drug with both anti-scarring and immune suppressing properties, can lower the amount of protein in the urine and slow or stop the kidney disease. Patients 13 years of age and older with FSGS who have had at least one standard treatment for FSGS may be eligible for this 24-month study. Pregnant and nursing women may not participate. Candidates will be screened with a medical history and physical examination, review of medical records and kidney biopsy, 24-hour urine collection, and blood tests. Participants will take sirolimus tablets once a day for 1 year. Three 24-hour urine collections will be done before starting treatment. Blood will be drawn to measure drug levels every week for the first month after starting treatment, then every other week for 1 month, and then every 2 months until treatment stops. Patients who do not have a complete response to the drug at low levels will have their dose increased. Patients will be seen at the NIH clinic in Bethesda, Md., for the screening visit and then at 1, 4, 8, 12, and 15 months for blood and urine tests. Additional urine collections and blood tests will be done periodically throughout the 24-month study period by the patient's local physician. Patients whose urine protein decreases on therapy will be asked to wait 3 months before starting another treatment and will monitored during that time to determine if the response is sustained. Patients whose urine protein levels do not decrease with sirolimus will not be asked to wait 3 months before starting another therapy. Follow-up with the local physician will continue at 18 and 24 months after starting the study. Patients whose urine protein levels increase with sirolimus treatment will be taken off the study and may seek other treatment at any time.
NCT00043979 ↗ Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With High-Risk and Recurrent Pediatric Sarcomas Completed National Cancer Institute (NCI) Phase 2 2002-09-19 This study will examine the safety and effectiveness of stem cell transplantation for treating patients with sarcomas (tumors of the bone, nerves, or soft tissue). Stem cells are immature cells in the bone marrow and blood stream that develop into blood cells. Stem cells transplanted from a healthy donor travel to the patient's bone marrow and begin producing normal cells. In patients with certain cancers, such as leukemia and lymphoma, the donor's immune cells attack the patient's cancer cells in what is called a "graft-versus-tumor" effect, contributing to cure of the disease. This study will determine whether this treatment can be used successfully to treat patients with sarcomas. Patients between 4 and 35 years of age with a sarcoma that has spread from the primary site or cannot be removed surgically, and for whom effective treatment is not available, may be eligible for this study. Candidates must have been diagnosed by the age of 30 at the time of enrollment. They must have a matched donor (usually a sibling). Participants undergo the following procedures: Donors: Stem cells are collected from the donor. To do this, the hormone granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is injected under the skin for several days to move stem cells out of the bone marrow into the bloodstream. Then, the cells are collected by apheresis. In this procedure the blood is drawn through a needle placed in one arm and pumped into a machine where the stem cells are separated out and removed. The rest of the blood is returned to the donor through a needle in the other arm. Patients: For patients who do not already have a central venous catheter (plastic tube), one is placed into a major vein. This tube can stay in the body the entire treatment period for giving medications, transfusing blood, , withdrawing blood samples, and delivering the donated stem cells. Before the transplant procedure, patients receive from one to three cycles of "induction" chemotherapy, with each cycle consisting of 5 days of fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone followed by at least a 17-day rest period. All the drugs are infused through the catheter except prednisone, which is taken by mouth. After the induction therapy, the patient is admitted to the hospital for 5 days of chemotherapy with high doses of cyclophosphamide, melphalan, and fludarabine. Two days later, the stem cells are infused. The anticipated hospital stay is about 3 weeks, but may be longer if complications arise. Patients are discharged when their white cell count is near normal, they have no fever or infection, they can take sufficient food and fluids by mouth, and they have no signs of serious graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-a condition in which the donor's cells "see" the patient's cells as foreign and mount an immune response against them. After hospital discharge, patients are followed in the clinic at least once or twice weekly for a medical history, physical exam, and blood tests for 100 days. They receive medications to prevent infection and GVHD and, if needed, blood transfusions. If GVHD has not developed by about 120 days post transplant, patients receive additional white cells to boost the immune response. After 100 days, follow-up visits may be less frequent. Follow-up continues for at least 5 years. During the course of the study, patients undergo repeated medical evaluations, including blood tests and radiology studies, to check on the cancer and on any treatment side effects. On four occasions, white blood cells may be collected through apheresis to see if immune responses can be generated against the sarcomas treated in this study. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans may be done on five occasions. This test uses a radioactive material to produce images useful in detecting primary tumors and cancer that has spread.
NCT00044720 ↗ Study Evaluating Sirolimus in End Stage Renal Disease in High Risk Kidney Transplant Recipients Completed Wyeth is now a wholly owned subsidiary of Pfizer Phase 4 1969-12-31 The incidence of efficacy failure at 12 months between two regimens.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for Rapamune

Condition Name

Condition Name for Rapamune
Intervention Trials
Kidney Transplantation 16
Sickle Cell Disease 8
Advanced Cancer 7
Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm 7
[disabled in preview] 0
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Rapamune
Intervention Trials
Graft vs Host Disease 27
Leukemia 23
Neoplasms 22
Leukemia, Myeloid 17
[disabled in preview] 0
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Clinical Trial Locations for Rapamune

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Rapamune
Location Trials
United States 418
Canada 18
Belgium 15
Germany 11
France 11
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Rapamune
Location Trials
California 33
Maryland 27
Pennsylvania 26
Florida 23
Illinois 22
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Clinical Trial Progress for Rapamune

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Rapamune
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 27
Phase 3 20
Phase 2/Phase 3 11
[disabled in preview] 96
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Rapamune
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 120
Recruiting 34
Terminated 25
[disabled in preview] 32
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Clinical Trial Sponsors for Rapamune

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Rapamune
Sponsor Trials
National Cancer Institute (NCI) 48
Wyeth is now a wholly owned subsidiary of Pfizer 20
Pfizer 15
[disabled in preview] 20
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Rapamune
Sponsor Trials
Other 272
NIH 77
Industry 75
[disabled in preview] 1
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Make Better Decisions: Try a trial or see plans & pricing

Serving leading biopharmaceutical companies globally:

McKesson
Johnson and Johnson
McKinsey
Express Scripts
Medtronic
AstraZeneca

Drugs may be covered by multiple patents or regulatory protections. All trademarks and applicant names are the property of their respective owners or licensors. Although great care is taken in the proper and correct provision of this service, thinkBiotech LLC does not accept any responsibility for possible consequences of errors or omissions in the provided data. The data presented herein is for information purposes only. There is no warranty that the data contained herein is error free. thinkBiotech performs no independent verification of facts as provided by public sources nor are attempts made to provide legal or investing advice. Any reliance on data provided herein is done solely at the discretion of the user. Users of this service are advised to seek professional advice and independent confirmation before considering acting on any of the provided information. thinkBiotech LLC reserves the right to amend, extend or withdraw any part or all of the offered service without notice.