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Generated: December 18, 2018

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR POTASSIUM IODIDE

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Clinical Trials for Potassium Iodide

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary
NCT00001919 Neuroimaging of St. John's Wort-Induced Changes of Serotonin Metabolism in Normal Subjects Completed National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) N/A St. John's Wort is a popular dietary supplement that many people take to elevate mood or relieve stress. This study will test in normal volunteers whether this preparation may alter mood and if so, by what means. Animal studies suggest that St. John's Wort may work similarly to some antidepressants that affect levels of the chemical serotonin in the brain. Participants in this study must also be enrolled in NIMH protocol #98-M-0094 (SPECT Imaging of Dopamine and Serotonin Transporters in Neuropsychiatric Patients and Normal Volunteers) and protocol #91-M-014 (MRI Imaging of Neuropsychiatric Patients and Controls). Separate consent forms are required for each study. Candidates will undergo medical and psychiatric evaluations that may include blood and urine tests, electroencephalogram and electrocardiogram. Normal volunteers will have a mood assessment at the beginning of the study. They will then be randomly assigned to take either placebo (a pill with no active ingredient) or St. John's Wort 3 times a day for 2 weeks, and will be told what they are taking. After an 11-week hiatus, they will again start treatment on the same schedule, but will not be told which preparation they are receiving. Each evening during the 2-week treatment periods, subjects will complete a brief self-rating mood assessment questionnaire. At the end of each treatment period, they will undergo SPECT brain imaging (a type of CT scan) to determine dopamine and serotonin distribution and density in the brain. For this procedure, study subjects take three drops of potassium iodide solution within 24 hours before the scan and two drops nightly for 3 days following the procedure. About 10 ml (less than two teaspoons) of blood are drawn before a radioactive tracer is injected. SPECT imaging is done the next day. After about 1 hour of imaging, subjects are given either a placebo or St. John's Wort, and then imaging continues for another 2 hours. During the procedure, up to five blood samples of 6 ml each may be drawn. At some point during the study, a MRI scan of the brain will be done.
NCT00058721 Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography to Study Receptors in Parkinson's Disease Completed National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) N/A This study will use single photon emission computed tomography, or SPECT (see below), to examine brain nicotine receptors in evaluating the role of a chemical called acetylcholine in memory and other problems in Parkinson's disease (PD). Acetylcholine acts by binding to these nicotine receptors. Healthy normal volunteers and patients with Parkinson's disease 40 years of age and older, with or without dementia, may be eligible for this study. Candidates will be screened with physical and neurological examinations, a pen and paper test of memory and other mental functions, blood tests, and, for women of childbearing potential, a pregnancy test. Patients with cognition problems will have more intensive mental function tests. All participants will undergo the following procedures: - Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): This test uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to show structural and chemical changes in the brain. During the scan, the subject lies on a table in a narrow cylinder (the scanner). The time required in the scanner is about 1 hour, during which the subject is asked to lie very still for 10 to 15 minutes at a time. He or she can speak with a staff member via an intercom system at all times during the procedure. - SPECT: This nuclear medicine test produces a picture of the receptors in the brain. On the night before the scan, the day of the scan, and for 4 days after the scan, subjects take an oral dose of potassium iodide to protect the thyroid gland from the radioactive tracer used in the SPECT procedure. (People allergic to potassium iodide will take potassium perchlorate instead.) Before the scan, small radioactive markers containing 99Tc are glued to the subject's head. Two catheters (thin, flexible tubes) are placed in veins in the arms to inject the radioactive tracer [123I]5-I-A-85380 and to draw blood samples. Another catheter is placed in an artery in the wrist to draw arterial blood samples. During the scan, the subject lies on a bed with his or her head held still with a head holder. The scans are taken over a 6-hour period after injection of [123I]5-I-A-85380. An electrocardiogram, respiration, and blood pressure measures are taken before the tracer is injected, then 5 minutes after the injection, and again 30 to 60 minutes after the injection. Blood and urine samples are collected 5 to 6 hours after starting the scan. Participants are asked to urinate at least every 2 hours for 12 hours after injection of [123I]5-I-A-85380 to decrease radiation exposure.
NCT00061789 Imaging of Brain Receptors in Healthy Volunteers and in Patients With Schizophrenia Completed National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Phase 2 This study will use single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to study brain nicotine receptors (proteins on the surface of brain cells) in healthy subjects and in patients with schizophrenia. Autopsy findings in patients with schizophrenia show changes in their nicotine receptors. This study will use SPECT to look at these receptors in living schizophrenia patients and compare them with those in healthy subjects. The following individuals between 21 and 50 years of age (or between 21 and 80 years of age for Group 1 only) are eligible for this study: healthy non-smokers (Group 1); schizophrenia patients who smoke (Group 2); schizophrenia patients who do not smoke (Group 3); healthy smokers (Group 4); healthy non-smokers (Group 5). Patients with schizophrenia must be taking olanzapine (Zyprexa) or risperidone (Risperdal) for at least 6 months. All candidates will be screened at the first visit. Group 1 participants will have three more visits; Groups 2 through 5 will have two more visits. Visit 1 All participants will be screened with physical and neurological examinations; blood and urine tests; and neuropsychological tests to assess their ability to learn and remember words and numbers, to pay attention, and to quickly perform motor tasks, such as putting pegs into a piece of wood. In addition, they will have an eye movement test and event-related potential testing. For the eye test, the subject sits in a chair and leans forward with the chin on a chin rest. A band is tied around the head and very small amounts of invisible (infrared) light are shined into the eyes. The light is reflected back and measured. Wire electrodes are placed around the area of the eye and cheek to monitor eye blinks and eye movements. Subjects are asked to follow a light with their eyes and to look away from a light. For event- related potential testing, electrodes are placed on the scalp, forehead and cheeks, and brain activity is recorded while the subject identifies particular pictures and sounds. Visit 2 (and Visit 3 for Group 1) Participants will have a SPECT scan. On the night before the scan, the day of the scan, and for 4 days after the scan, subject take an oral dose of potassium iodide to protect the thyroid gland from the radioactive tracer used in the SPECT procedure. (Individuals allergic to potassium iodide will take potassium perchlorate instead.) For the SPECT scan, small radioactive markers containing 99mTc are glued to the subject's head. Two catheters (thin, flexible tubes) are placed in veins in the arms to inject the radioactive tracer [123I]5-I-A-85380 and to draw blood samples. During the scan, the subject lies on a bed with his or her head held still with a headholder. The scans are taken over a 9-hour period after injection of the tracer injection. An electrocardiogram, respiration, and blood pressure measures are taken before injection of [123I]5-I-A-85380, then 5 minutes after the injection, and again 30 to 60 minutes after the injection. Breath samples are collected every 60 minutes. Blood and urine samples are collected 5 to 6 hours after starting the scan. Group 1 subjects will have a second SPECT scan within 4 weeks of the first. Visit 3 (Visit 4 for Group 1) Participants will have a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. For this procedure, the subject lies on a table that slides into a narrow metal cylinder with a strong magnetic field for the scan. The scanner uses a magnetic field and radio waves to produce images that show structural and chemical changes in tissues. The test lasts up to 1 hour.
NCT00273351 Imaging and Genetic Biomarkers of Parkinson Disease (PD) Onset and Progression in High-risk Families Completed Molecular NeuroImaging Phase 2 Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by rigidity, bradykinesia, postural instability, and tremor. Clinical decline reflects ongoing degeneration of dopamine-containing neurons. A critical unmet need for clinical research is to improve early detection of these diseases by developing tools to assist with earlier diagnosis. Biomarkers are broadly defined as characteristics that are objectively measured and evaluated as indicators of normal biological processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention (Biomarkers Defintions Working Group 2001). Development of reliable biomarkers for PD would dramatically accelerate research on PD etiology, pathophysiology, disease progression and therapeutics. Specific biomarkers may be useful at the onset of neurodegeneration, the onset of disease, and/or to mark disease progression. The biomarkers in this study include brain imaging with a radioactively labelled drug (Beta-CIT), computerized testing of memory, attention, motor speed, judgment and handwriting, and assessments of speech and smell. Subjects may also be asked to provide a blood sample for genetic and biochemical testing.
NCT00273351 Imaging and Genetic Biomarkers of Parkinson Disease (PD) Onset and Progression in High-risk Families Completed United States Department of Defense Phase 2 Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by rigidity, bradykinesia, postural instability, and tremor. Clinical decline reflects ongoing degeneration of dopamine-containing neurons. A critical unmet need for clinical research is to improve early detection of these diseases by developing tools to assist with earlier diagnosis. Biomarkers are broadly defined as characteristics that are objectively measured and evaluated as indicators of normal biological processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention (Biomarkers Defintions Working Group 2001). Development of reliable biomarkers for PD would dramatically accelerate research on PD etiology, pathophysiology, disease progression and therapeutics. Specific biomarkers may be useful at the onset of neurodegeneration, the onset of disease, and/or to mark disease progression. The biomarkers in this study include brain imaging with a radioactively labelled drug (Beta-CIT), computerized testing of memory, attention, motor speed, judgment and handwriting, and assessments of speech and smell. Subjects may also be asked to provide a blood sample for genetic and biochemical testing.
Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary

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Clinical Trial Conditions for Potassium Iodide

Condition Name

Condition Name for Potassium Iodide
Intervention Trials
Metastatic Pheochromocytoma 2
Parkinson Disease 2
Relapsed Neuroblastoma 2
Pregnancy 1
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Potassium Iodide
Intervention Trials
Pheochromocytoma 3
Neuroblastoma 3
Lymphoma 2
Parkinson Disease 2
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Clinical Trial Locations for Potassium Iodide

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Potassium Iodide
Location Trials
United States 14
Pakistan 1
France 1
Canada 1
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Potassium Iodide
Location Trials
Maryland 4
New York 2
California 2
Texas 1
Florida 1
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Clinical Trial Progress for Potassium Iodide

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Potassium Iodide
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 1
Phase 3 4
Phase 2 4
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Potassium Iodide
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 7
Not yet recruiting 3
Recruiting 2
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Potassium Iodide

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Potassium Iodide
Sponsor Trials
GlaxoSmithKline 2
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) 2
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) 2
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Potassium Iodide
Sponsor Trials
Other 13
Industry 7
NIH 4
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Harvard Business School
AstraZeneca
Johnson and Johnson
Medtronic
McKesson
Boehringer Ingelheim
Cantor Fitzgerald
Accenture
Teva

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