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Generated: December 9, 2018

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR PLAQUENIL

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Clinical Trials for Plaquenil

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary
NCT00102557 Hydroxychloroquine vs. Clobetasol Rinse to Treat Oral Lichen Planus Completed National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Phase 2 This study will compare two treatments for oral lichen planus - hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) tablets and clobetasol oral rinse. Oral lichen planus is a chronic disorder in which patients have painful mouth ulcers that interfere with meals and daily functioning. It is most commonly treated with topical or systemic corticosteroids, but these drugs have a number of side effects, most commonly yeast infection, and chronic systemic use of them can lead to diabetes, osteoporosis, weight gain, and other complications. Also, lichen planus generally returns when the corticosteroids are stopped. Clobetasol oral rinse is a topical steroid commonly used to treat oral lichen planus. Hydroxychloroquine, a drug that was originally used to treat malaria and is now also approved for lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, has been tried for lichen planus in small-scale studies with some evidence of benefit. Patients 18 years of age and older with oral lichen planus may be eligible for this study. Pregnant women are excluded. Candidates are screened with a dermatology examination, routine blood tests, an eye examination, and a biopsy to rule out other conditions similar to lichen planus and to provide tissue for research purposes. For the biopsy, two small circles of tissue about 4 mm (less than 1/5") across are surgically removed from the area with lichen planus. Participants are randomly assigned to treatment with either hydroxychloroquine or clobetasol rinse. Patients assigned to hydroxychloroquine also take a placebo mouth rinse that looks and tastes like the clobetasol rinse, and those assigned to clobetasol also take a pill that looks and tastes like the hydroxychloroquine tablet. This is done so that neither the patients nor the study doctors know which patient is taking which active medication until the study is completed. Patients take the pills daily in the morning with food or a glass of milk for the 6-month study period and use the rinse twice a day for 4 months and then once a day for 2 months. They may not use any pain or anti-inflammatory medicines or topical creams, gels or rinses regularly, because these medications can obscure the effects of the study drugs and complicate interpretation of the results. They are given a topical numbing medicine as part of the study and can use Tylenol for pain during the study duration. In addition to treatment, participants visit the NIH Clinical Center once a month for the following tests and procedures: - Review of pain levels, as recorded in a pain diary - Review of drug side effects, if any - Collection of saliva and blood samples at 2, 4 and 6 months - Repeat oral biopsy at completion of the study at 6 months to evaluate treatment effects - Final examination at 8 months to determine if the disease returns or improves after the medication is stopped.
NCT00176982 Plaquenil for Alopecia Areata, Alopecia Totalis Completed Hordinsky, Maria K., MD Phase 4 Alopecia areata is an autoimmune condition resulting in hair loss and complete baldness (alopecia totalis). Published evidence says that it is mediated by T-lymphocytes. Plaquenil is an anti-inflammatory drug approved by the FDA for malaria, lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis. It has an effect on T-lymphocyte mediated inflammation, making it a logical choice for a treatment trail for alopecia areata.
NCT00405275 Rheumatoid Arthritis: Comparison of Active Therapies in Patients With Active Disease Despite Methotrexate Therapy Completed Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) N/A Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints leading to joint destruction, with significant long-term morbidity and mortality. Early treatment of RA patients with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) significantly decreases these complications. Methotrexate (MTX) is an excellent, economical first-line DMARD used to treat a majority of RA patients. While most patients respond well to MTX, many continue to have active disease. Therefore, understanding how to best treat RA patients with active disease despite MTX therapy is critically important. Although a number of therapies with significantly different economic implications have been shown to be effective when added to MTX, no trial has directly compared active therapies. This study will compare therapeutic strategies using two regimens with proven efficacy when added to MTX therapy; a) hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine (cost ~ $1000 per year); b) the tumor necrosis factor inhibitor, etanercept (cost ~ $12,000 per year). We propose a bi-national multi-center randomized, double-blind equivalency trial comparing (A) the strategy of initially adding hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine to MTX in patients with active disease despite MTX, with a switch at 24 weeks to etanercept in nonresponders to (B) a strategy of adding etanercept to MTX, with a switch to hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine in nonresponders at 24 weeks. If we find that the strategy of first adding hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine to MTX identifies a subset of responsive patients and that there is no harm to nonresponders because of early rescue with etanercept, then this less expensive option should become the standard treatment for MTX resistant patients. Four hundred and fifty RA patients with active disease despite treatment with MTX as indicated by a Disease Activity Score with 28 joints (DAS28) of >4.4 units will be randomized. A DAS improvement of <1.2 (validated as clinically significant) at 24 weeks will be used to identify early nonresponder who will switch therapy. Subjects with a DAS28 improvement of > 1.2 at 24 weeks will remain on their initial therapy. The primary endpoint is the change of DAS 28 scores from baseline to 48 weeks. The secondary endpoint is comparison of radiographic progression of disease at 48 weeks, as measured by the change in Sharp score. Economic and functional outcomes will be assessed and a serum and DNA bank will be established to evaluate potential biomarkers predictive of treatment response/toxicity and disease progression. This trial will recruit 450 subjects over 40 months. At the end of the 48 week blinded active therapy portion of the trial, the blind will be broken and data will be collected in an open fashion until all 450 patients have completed the 48 week portion of the trial.
NCT00405275 Rheumatoid Arthritis: Comparison of Active Therapies in Patients With Active Disease Despite Methotrexate Therapy Completed National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) N/A Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints leading to joint destruction, with significant long-term morbidity and mortality. Early treatment of RA patients with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) significantly decreases these complications. Methotrexate (MTX) is an excellent, economical first-line DMARD used to treat a majority of RA patients. While most patients respond well to MTX, many continue to have active disease. Therefore, understanding how to best treat RA patients with active disease despite MTX therapy is critically important. Although a number of therapies with significantly different economic implications have been shown to be effective when added to MTX, no trial has directly compared active therapies. This study will compare therapeutic strategies using two regimens with proven efficacy when added to MTX therapy; a) hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine (cost ~ $1000 per year); b) the tumor necrosis factor inhibitor, etanercept (cost ~ $12,000 per year). We propose a bi-national multi-center randomized, double-blind equivalency trial comparing (A) the strategy of initially adding hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine to MTX in patients with active disease despite MTX, with a switch at 24 weeks to etanercept in nonresponders to (B) a strategy of adding etanercept to MTX, with a switch to hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine in nonresponders at 24 weeks. If we find that the strategy of first adding hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine to MTX identifies a subset of responsive patients and that there is no harm to nonresponders because of early rescue with etanercept, then this less expensive option should become the standard treatment for MTX resistant patients. Four hundred and fifty RA patients with active disease despite treatment with MTX as indicated by a Disease Activity Score with 28 joints (DAS28) of >4.4 units will be randomized. A DAS improvement of <1.2 (validated as clinically significant) at 24 weeks will be used to identify early nonresponder who will switch therapy. Subjects with a DAS28 improvement of > 1.2 at 24 weeks will remain on their initial therapy. The primary endpoint is the change of DAS 28 scores from baseline to 48 weeks. The secondary endpoint is comparison of radiographic progression of disease at 48 weeks, as measured by the change in Sharp score. Economic and functional outcomes will be assessed and a serum and DNA bank will be established to evaluate potential biomarkers predictive of treatment response/toxicity and disease progression. This trial will recruit 450 subjects over 40 months. At the end of the 48 week blinded active therapy portion of the trial, the blind will be broken and data will be collected in an open fashion until all 450 patients have completed the 48 week portion of the trial.
NCT00405275 Rheumatoid Arthritis: Comparison of Active Therapies in Patients With Active Disease Despite Methotrexate Therapy Completed Rheumatoid Arthritis Investigational Network (RAIN) N/A Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints leading to joint destruction, with significant long-term morbidity and mortality. Early treatment of RA patients with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) significantly decreases these complications. Methotrexate (MTX) is an excellent, economical first-line DMARD used to treat a majority of RA patients. While most patients respond well to MTX, many continue to have active disease. Therefore, understanding how to best treat RA patients with active disease despite MTX therapy is critically important. Although a number of therapies with significantly different economic implications have been shown to be effective when added to MTX, no trial has directly compared active therapies. This study will compare therapeutic strategies using two regimens with proven efficacy when added to MTX therapy; a) hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine (cost ~ $1000 per year); b) the tumor necrosis factor inhibitor, etanercept (cost ~ $12,000 per year). We propose a bi-national multi-center randomized, double-blind equivalency trial comparing (A) the strategy of initially adding hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine to MTX in patients with active disease despite MTX, with a switch at 24 weeks to etanercept in nonresponders to (B) a strategy of adding etanercept to MTX, with a switch to hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine in nonresponders at 24 weeks. If we find that the strategy of first adding hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine to MTX identifies a subset of responsive patients and that there is no harm to nonresponders because of early rescue with etanercept, then this less expensive option should become the standard treatment for MTX resistant patients. Four hundred and fifty RA patients with active disease despite treatment with MTX as indicated by a Disease Activity Score with 28 joints (DAS28) of >4.4 units will be randomized. A DAS improvement of <1.2 (validated as clinically significant) at 24 weeks will be used to identify early nonresponder who will switch therapy. Subjects with a DAS28 improvement of > 1.2 at 24 weeks will remain on their initial therapy. The primary endpoint is the change of DAS 28 scores from baseline to 48 weeks. The secondary endpoint is comparison of radiographic progression of disease at 48 weeks, as measured by the change in Sharp score. Economic and functional outcomes will be assessed and a serum and DNA bank will be established to evaluate potential biomarkers predictive of treatment response/toxicity and disease progression. This trial will recruit 450 subjects over 40 months. At the end of the 48 week blinded active therapy portion of the trial, the blind will be broken and data will be collected in an open fashion until all 450 patients have completed the 48 week portion of the trial.
NCT00405275 Rheumatoid Arthritis: Comparison of Active Therapies in Patients With Active Disease Despite Methotrexate Therapy Completed VA Office of Research and Development N/A Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints leading to joint destruction, with significant long-term morbidity and mortality. Early treatment of RA patients with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) significantly decreases these complications. Methotrexate (MTX) is an excellent, economical first-line DMARD used to treat a majority of RA patients. While most patients respond well to MTX, many continue to have active disease. Therefore, understanding how to best treat RA patients with active disease despite MTX therapy is critically important. Although a number of therapies with significantly different economic implications have been shown to be effective when added to MTX, no trial has directly compared active therapies. This study will compare therapeutic strategies using two regimens with proven efficacy when added to MTX therapy; a) hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine (cost ~ $1000 per year); b) the tumor necrosis factor inhibitor, etanercept (cost ~ $12,000 per year). We propose a bi-national multi-center randomized, double-blind equivalency trial comparing (A) the strategy of initially adding hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine to MTX in patients with active disease despite MTX, with a switch at 24 weeks to etanercept in nonresponders to (B) a strategy of adding etanercept to MTX, with a switch to hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine in nonresponders at 24 weeks. If we find that the strategy of first adding hydroxychloroquine and sulfasalazine to MTX identifies a subset of responsive patients and that there is no harm to nonresponders because of early rescue with etanercept, then this less expensive option should become the standard treatment for MTX resistant patients. Four hundred and fifty RA patients with active disease despite treatment with MTX as indicated by a Disease Activity Score with 28 joints (DAS28) of >4.4 units will be randomized. A DAS improvement of <1.2 (validated as clinically significant) at 24 weeks will be used to identify early nonresponder who will switch therapy. Subjects with a DAS28 improvement of > 1.2 at 24 weeks will remain on their initial therapy. The primary endpoint is the change of DAS 28 scores from baseline to 48 weeks. The secondary endpoint is comparison of radiographic progression of disease at 48 weeks, as measured by the change in Sharp score. Economic and functional outcomes will be assessed and a serum and DNA bank will be established to evaluate potential biomarkers predictive of treatment response/toxicity and disease progression. This trial will recruit 450 subjects over 40 months. At the end of the 48 week blinded active therapy portion of the trial, the blind will be broken and data will be collected in an open fashion until all 450 patients have completed the 48 week portion of the trial.
Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary

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Clinical Trial Conditions for Plaquenil

Condition Name

Condition Name for Plaquenil
Intervention Trials
Pancreatic Cancer 4
Rheumatoid Arthritis 2
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus 2
Porphyria Cutanea Tarda 1
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Plaquenil
Intervention Trials
Arthritis 5
Arthritis, Rheumatoid 4
Pancreatic Neoplasms 4
Diabetes Mellitus 4
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Clinical Trial Locations for Plaquenil

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Plaquenil
Location Trials
United States 76
Canada 6
France 2
Taiwan 2
Netherlands 2
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Plaquenil
Location Trials
Pennsylvania 11
Texas 7
Massachusetts 6
New York 6
California 5
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Clinical Trial Progress for Plaquenil

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Plaquenil
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 4
Phase 3 6
Phase 2 21
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Plaquenil
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Recruiting 16
Completed 12
Not yet recruiting 7
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Plaquenil

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Plaquenil
Sponsor Trials
University of Pittsburgh 4
Brigham and Women's Hospital 3
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) 3
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Plaquenil
Sponsor Trials
Other 56
NIH 9
Industry 3
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Serving hundreds of leading biopharmaceutical companies globally:

Argus Health
US Army
Cantor Fitzgerald
Cipla
Harvard Business School
UBS
Chinese Patent Office
Express Scripts
Healthtrust

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