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Last Updated: June 26, 2022

CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL HYDROCHLORIDE


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505(b)(2) Clinical Trials for Mycophenolate Mofetil Hydrochloride

This table shows clinical trials for potential 505(b)(2) applications. See the next table for all clinical trials
Trial Type Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
New Formulation NCT00717470 ↗ A Study in Kidney Transplant Subjects to Investigate the Optimal Suppression of Immunity to Help Prevent Kidney Rejection Completed Astellas Pharma Inc Phase 4 2008-05-14 To compare how well the new formulation of Tacrolimus® used once daily, in combination with other drugs helps prevent the rejection of a new kidney after transplantation compared to the twice daily dose of Tacrolimus
New Combination NCT03249831 ↗ A Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Sickle Cell Disease Recruiting California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) Phase 1 2019-01-04 Blood stem cells can produce red blood cells (which carry oxygen), white blood cells of the immune system (which fight infections) and platelets (which help the blood clot). Patients with sickle cell disease produce abnormal red blood cells. A blood stem cell transplant from a donor is a treatment option for patients with severe sickle cell disease. The donor can be healthy or have the sickle cell trait. The blood stem cell transplant will be given to the patient as an intravenous infusion (IV). The donor blood stem cells will then make normal red blood cells - as well as other types of blood cells - in the patient. When blood cells from two people co-exist in the patient, this is called mixed chimerism. Most children are successfully treated with blood stem cells from a sibling (brother/sister) who completely shares their tissue type (full-matched donor). However, transplant is not an option for patients who (1) have serious medical problems, and/or (2) do not have a full-matched donor. Most patients will have a relative who shares half of their tissue type (e.g. parent, child, and brother/sister) and can be a donor (half-matched or haploidentical donor). Adult patients with severe sickle cell disease were successfully treated with a half-matched transplant in a clinical study. Researchers would like to make half-matched transplant an option for more patients by (1) improving transplant success and (2) reducing transplanted-related complications. This research transplant is being tested in this Pilot study for the first time. It is different from a standard transplant because: 1. Half-matched related donors will be used, and 2. A new combination of drugs (chemotherapy) that does not completely wipe out the bone marrow cells (non-myeloablative treatment) will be used to prepare the patient for transplant, and 3. Most of the donor CD4+ T cells (a type of immune cells) will be removed (depleted) before giving the blood stem cell transplant to the patient to improve transplant outcomes. It is hoped that the research transplant: 1. Will reverse sickle cell disease and improve patient quality of life, 2. Will reduce side effects and help the patient recover faster from the transplant, 3. Help the patient keep the transplant longer and 4. Reduce serious transplant-related complications.
New Combination NCT03249831 ↗ A Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Sickle Cell Disease Recruiting City of Hope Medical Center Phase 1 2019-01-04 Blood stem cells can produce red blood cells (which carry oxygen), white blood cells of the immune system (which fight infections) and platelets (which help the blood clot). Patients with sickle cell disease produce abnormal red blood cells. A blood stem cell transplant from a donor is a treatment option for patients with severe sickle cell disease. The donor can be healthy or have the sickle cell trait. The blood stem cell transplant will be given to the patient as an intravenous infusion (IV). The donor blood stem cells will then make normal red blood cells - as well as other types of blood cells - in the patient. When blood cells from two people co-exist in the patient, this is called mixed chimerism. Most children are successfully treated with blood stem cells from a sibling (brother/sister) who completely shares their tissue type (full-matched donor). However, transplant is not an option for patients who (1) have serious medical problems, and/or (2) do not have a full-matched donor. Most patients will have a relative who shares half of their tissue type (e.g. parent, child, and brother/sister) and can be a donor (half-matched or haploidentical donor). Adult patients with severe sickle cell disease were successfully treated with a half-matched transplant in a clinical study. Researchers would like to make half-matched transplant an option for more patients by (1) improving transplant success and (2) reducing transplanted-related complications. This research transplant is being tested in this Pilot study for the first time. It is different from a standard transplant because: 1. Half-matched related donors will be used, and 2. A new combination of drugs (chemotherapy) that does not completely wipe out the bone marrow cells (non-myeloablative treatment) will be used to prepare the patient for transplant, and 3. Most of the donor CD4+ T cells (a type of immune cells) will be removed (depleted) before giving the blood stem cell transplant to the patient to improve transplant outcomes. It is hoped that the research transplant: 1. Will reverse sickle cell disease and improve patient quality of life, 2. Will reduce side effects and help the patient recover faster from the transplant, 3. Help the patient keep the transplant longer and 4. Reduce serious transplant-related complications.
New Combination NCT04104438 ↗ Examination of Immunosuppression Adjustment Impact on Kidney Function in Liver Transplant Not yet recruiting Fady M Kaldas, M.D., F.A.C.S. Phase 4 2019-11-01 This is a study to help understand how well new combinations of immunosuppressive medications (medications that weaken your immune system to prevent your body from rejecting the transplanted liver) work compared to standard immunosuppressive medications after your liver transplant. Also the study will assess how safe the new combination of immunosuppressive medicines are and if there are any changes in how your kidneys work after taking these medicines.
>Trial Type >Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

All Clinical Trials for Mycophenolate Mofetil Hydrochloride

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00000936 ↗ A Study To Test An Anti-Rejection Therapy After Kidney Transplantation Terminated National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 3 1999-11-01 Kidney transplantation is often successful. However, despite aggressive anti-rejection drug therapy, some patients will reject their new kidney. This study is designed to test two anti-rejection approaches. Two medications in this study are currently used in children, but there is no information regarding which drug is safer or more effective. Survival rates in renal transplantation are unacceptably low. Therefore, there is a need for an improved post-transplant treatment, such as the induction therapy used in this study.
NCT00001764 ↗ Mycophenolate Mofetil to Treat Wegener's Granulomatosis and Related Vascular Inflammatory Conditions Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 1 1998-04-01 This study will examine the safety and effectiveness of the drug mycophenolate mofetil (MPM) in treating Wegener's granulomatosis and related inflammatory vessel diseases. Blood vessel inflammation in these patients may involve different parts of the body, including the brain, nerves, eyes, sinuses, lungs, kidneys, intestinal tract, skin, joints, heart, and other sites. The more severe the involvement, the more likely the disease will be life-threatening. Standard treatment consists of combination drug therapy with prednisone and a cytotoxic agent-usually cyclophosphamide or methotrexate. However, some patients in whom this treatment is initially successful have a disease relapse; other patients cannot take the medications because of other health problems or because of severe side effects of the drugs. MPM is approved by the Food and Drug Administration to prevent kidney transplant rejection. It is chemically similar to another cytotoxic drug called azathioprine, which has been beneficial in maintaining remission in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis who have been treated successfully with cyclophosphamide. Because MPM is more effective than azathioprine in preventing organ rejection, it may also prove beneficial as a second-line treatment for Wegener's granulomatosis. Patients with Wegener's granulomatosis or related inflammatory vessel diseases who have had a relapse following treatment with cyclophosphamide and methotrexate or who cannot take one or both of these drugs may be eligible for this study. Only patients who have been treated at NIH in the methotrexate protocol or the cyclophosphamide switching to methotrexate protocol, or who have received the exact same treatment from their own physician may participate. Participants will have a complete medical evaluation including laboratory studies. Consultations, X-rays and biopsies of affected organs may also be done if indicated for diagnosis or treatment. Patients with active disease will be given MPM and prednisone, both in tablet form. Patients with inactive disease will receive only prednisone if they are already taking it. In both cases, the prednisone will be reduced gradually and discontinued if the disease improves significantly. MPM therapy will continue for at least 2 years. If after 2 years the disease remains in remission, the MPM dose will be gradually reduced and then stopped. If active disease recurs while on MPM therapy, the treatment plan will likely be changed. The new regimen will be determined by the severity of disease, other medical conditions, and history of side effects to previous medications. Patients will be followed at the NIH clinic every month for the first 3 months on MPM and then every 3 months for another 18 months. Those whose disease has remained in remission and have stopped all medications will then be followed every 6 months for 4 visits. The follow-up visits will include a physical examination, blood draws, and, if needed, X-rays. Visits may be scheduled more frequently if medically indicated.
NCT00001964 ↗ Combination Therapy of Severe Aplastic Anemia Completed National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Phase 2 2000-03-17 This study will test the safety and effectiveness of a combination of three drugs in treating severe aplastic anemia and preventing its recurrence. Two drugs used in this trial ATG and cyclosporine are standard combination therapy for aplastic anemia. This study will try to improve this therapy in three ways: 1) by altering the drug regimen to allow the drugs to work better; 2) by reducing the risk of kidney damage; and 3) by adding a third drug mycophenolate mofetil to try to prevent disease relapse. Patients with severe aplastic anemia who do not have a suitable bone marrow donor or who decline bone marrow transplantation may participate in this study. Patients will have a skin test for ATG allergy, chest X-ray, blood test, and bone marrow aspiration before treatment begins. ATG will then be started, infused through a vein continuously for 4 days. Ten days after ATG is stopped, cyclosporine treatment will begin, taken twice a day by mouth in either liquid or capsule form and will continue for 6 months. Also, in the first 2 weeks of treatment, patients will be given a full dose of corticosteroid (prednisone) to prevent serum sickness that could develop as a side effect of ATG therapy. The dosage will be decreased after that. Mycophenolate will be started at the same time as ATG, in two daily doses by mouth, and will continue for 18 months. Patients will be hospitalized at the beginning of the study. During this time, blood will be drawn at 3-week intervals and a bone marrow examination will be repeated 3 months after treatment has begun. Additional tests, including X-rays may be required. After hospital discharge, patients will be followed on an outpatient basis at 3-month intervals. The patients own physician will perform blood tests weekly and kidney and liver function tests every 2 weeks during cyclosporine therapy. Transfusions may be required initially.
NCT00003145 ↗ Fludarabine Phosphate, Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation, and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Older Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Completed National Cancer Institute (NCI) Phase 2 1997-08-01 This clinical trial studies fludarabine phosphate, low-dose total-body irradiation, and peripheral blood stem cell transplant followed by donor lymphocyte infusion in treating older patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening. Once the donated stem cells begin working, the patient's immune system may see the remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and destroy them (called graft-versus-tumor effect). Giving an infusion of the donor's white blood cells (donor lymphocyte infusion) may boost this effect.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for Mycophenolate Mofetil Hydrochloride

Condition Name

Condition Name for Mycophenolate Mofetil Hydrochloride
Intervention Trials
Kidney Transplantation 80
Leukemia 79
Lymphoma 64
Myelodysplastic Syndromes 61
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Mycophenolate Mofetil Hydrochloride
Intervention Trials
Leukemia 178
Myelodysplastic Syndromes 152
Preleukemia 146
Syndrome 125
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Clinical Trial Locations for Mycophenolate Mofetil Hydrochloride

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Mycophenolate Mofetil Hydrochloride
Location Trials
Canada 140
China 96
Italy 83
Spain 81
Germany 72
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Mycophenolate Mofetil Hydrochloride
Location Trials
California 148
New York 120
Washington 113
Texas 109
Ohio 94
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Clinical Trial Progress for Mycophenolate Mofetil Hydrochloride

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Mycophenolate Mofetil Hydrochloride
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 196
Phase 3 133
Phase 2/Phase 3 29
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Mycophenolate Mofetil Hydrochloride
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 484
Recruiting 119
Terminated 115
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Mycophenolate Mofetil Hydrochloride

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Mycophenolate Mofetil Hydrochloride
Sponsor Trials
National Cancer Institute (NCI) 168
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center 81
Hoffmann-La Roche 61
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Mycophenolate Mofetil Hydrochloride
Sponsor Trials
Other 1034
Industry 393
NIH 275
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