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Last Updated: November 18, 2019

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR MIRTAZAPINE

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All Clinical Trials for Mirtazapine

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00021528 Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) Completed National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Phase 4 2001-07-01 STAR*D focuses on non-psychotic major depressive disorder in adults who are seen in outpatient settings. The primary purpose of this research study is to determine which treatments work best if the first treatment with medication does not produce an acceptable response. Participants will first receive citalopram, an SSRI medication; if symptoms remain after 8-12 weeks of treatment, up to four other levels of treatment will be offered, including cognitive therapy and other medications. There are no placebo treatments. Some patients may require a combination of two or more treatments to obtain full benefit. Participation could last from 15 to 27 months and involve up to 30 clinic visits. Participants will be interviewed by telephone throughout the study about their symptoms, daily functioning, treatment side effects, use of the health care system, and satisfaction with treatment. There will be a one-year follow up for participants once their depression has been successfully treated
NCT00108498 New Pharmacological Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Completed VA Office of Research and Development Phase 1 2003-10-01 This study will determine if mirtazapine, a unique antidepressant that does not disturb sleep, will improve obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The design is randomized, crossover, double blind, and placebo controlled. On two consecutive nights of one week, the patients receive either 30 mg mirtazapine or placebo at bedtime. The following week, the alternative medication is administered. The patients have known mild to moderate sleep apnea. The endpoints of the study are the apnea + hypopnea index (AHI), sleep quality, and the degree of arterial oxygen desaturation.
NCT00150839 Hippocampal Volume in Young Patients With Major Depression Before and After Combined Antidepressive Therapy Unknown status University of Erlangen-Nürnberg Phase 4 2006-03-01 The proposed study is a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of antidepressant combination for the treatment of depression. Depressive disorder is one of the most common human diseases with a high burden for every patient, her/his family, health care system and society as a whole. Actual treatment concepts of depressive disorders include pharmacologic, biologic (e.g. electroconvulsive therapy, light therapy) and psychologic therapy. Even though effective therapeutic options are at hand, therapy needs time. It is often not possible to reach full remission of the disease and 10-25% of patients suffering from depression are regarded as "treatment-resistant". In treatment resistant depression, the use of a combination of antidepressive drugs is considered safe and effective. However, at present no data exist concerning the use of drug combination as primary therapeutic option. The aim of the study is to examine the hypothesis, that significantly more patients achieve full remission of depressive symptoms when treated with the combination of two antidepressants and as a secondary hypothesis, that patients receiving a drug combination will achieve remission faster than patients treated with monotherapy. To test these hypotheses, a two group parallel design is used comparing the efficacy and safety of mirtazapine in combination with venlafaxine or placebo.
NCT00249444 Mirtazapine for Treating Cocaine Dependent Individuals Who Also Suffer From Depression Completed National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Phase 2 2006-05-01 Many substance dependent individuals also suffer from depression. Past research suggests that antidepressant medication is helpful in treating such individuals. This study will determine the effectiveness of mirtazapine, an antidepressant medication, in treating cocaine dependent individuals who also suffer from depression. This study includes free treatment for cocaine dependence that includes medication and a behavioral intervention.
NCT00249444 Mirtazapine for Treating Cocaine Dependent Individuals Who Also Suffer From Depression Completed New York State Psychiatric Institute Phase 2 2006-05-01 Many substance dependent individuals also suffer from depression. Past research suggests that antidepressant medication is helpful in treating such individuals. This study will determine the effectiveness of mirtazapine, an antidepressant medication, in treating cocaine dependent individuals who also suffer from depression. This study includes free treatment for cocaine dependence that includes medication and a behavioral intervention.
NCT00287352 Study of Amantadine for Weight Stabilization During Olanzapine Treatment Completed Eli Lilly and Company Phase 1 2005-05-01 Weight gain associated with antipsychotic medication use is a major side effect that limits the tolerability of these drugs. This often significant weight gain adversely affects health, increasing risks for developing cardiovascular disease, diabetes, sleep apnea, cancers of the colon, kidneys, uterus, endometrium and esophagus and osteoarthritis. Beasley and colleagues (1997) reported that 40.5% of olanzapine-treated patients gained more than 7% of baseline weight. Much of the olanzapine induced weight gain occurs early in treatment, and antipsychotic-naïve and young patients (Woods et al., 2002) are particularly vulnerable to this side effect. One of the most promising medications to aid weight loss in patients taking olanzapine is amantadine. Attempts at preventing weight gain are expected to be more successful than attempts to reverse it once it occurs. It is now common clinical practice to educate all patients beginning treatment with olanzapine, and other antipsychotics, about healthy eating and the need for exercise. However, despite this effort, weight gain in this population continues. Beginning a weight-stabilizing medication after a low threshold of weight gain has occurred may have significant impact on patients' health and their willingness to continue to take antipsychotics. We propose to investigate the efficacy of amantadine as a weight-stabilizing agent in a population of first-episode psychotic subjects just beginning treatment with antipsychotic agents. This population is generally young and medically healthy, without contraindications to amantadine. They are often of normal body mass index and without obesity-related medical problems. They have much to gain in preventing the weight gain which so often progresses steadily over the course of treatment, is difficult to reverse and results in significant morbidity and mortality. Additionally, the first episode psychotic population tends to take fewer concomitant psychiatric medications. This is important since these medications may cause weight gain (long term use of mirtazapine, lithium, depakote) or weight loss (short term use of SSRI's) which could confound the effectiveness of amantadine to combat weight gain.
NCT00287352 Study of Amantadine for Weight Stabilization During Olanzapine Treatment Completed University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill Phase 1 2005-05-01 Weight gain associated with antipsychotic medication use is a major side effect that limits the tolerability of these drugs. This often significant weight gain adversely affects health, increasing risks for developing cardiovascular disease, diabetes, sleep apnea, cancers of the colon, kidneys, uterus, endometrium and esophagus and osteoarthritis. Beasley and colleagues (1997) reported that 40.5% of olanzapine-treated patients gained more than 7% of baseline weight. Much of the olanzapine induced weight gain occurs early in treatment, and antipsychotic-naïve and young patients (Woods et al., 2002) are particularly vulnerable to this side effect. One of the most promising medications to aid weight loss in patients taking olanzapine is amantadine. Attempts at preventing weight gain are expected to be more successful than attempts to reverse it once it occurs. It is now common clinical practice to educate all patients beginning treatment with olanzapine, and other antipsychotics, about healthy eating and the need for exercise. However, despite this effort, weight gain in this population continues. Beginning a weight-stabilizing medication after a low threshold of weight gain has occurred may have significant impact on patients' health and their willingness to continue to take antipsychotics. We propose to investigate the efficacy of amantadine as a weight-stabilizing agent in a population of first-episode psychotic subjects just beginning treatment with antipsychotic agents. This population is generally young and medically healthy, without contraindications to amantadine. They are often of normal body mass index and without obesity-related medical problems. They have much to gain in preventing the weight gain which so often progresses steadily over the course of treatment, is difficult to reverse and results in significant morbidity and mortality. Additionally, the first episode psychotic population tends to take fewer concomitant psychiatric medications. This is important since these medications may cause weight gain (long term use of mirtazapine, lithium, depakote) or weight loss (short term use of SSRI's) which could confound the effectiveness of amantadine to combat weight gain.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for Mirtazapine

Condition Name

Condition Name for Mirtazapine
Intervention Trials
Depression 11
Major Depressive Disorder 11
Healthy 6
Anorexia 4
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Mirtazapine
Intervention Trials
Depression 31
Depressive Disorder 25
Depressive Disorder, Major 18
Disease 10
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Clinical Trial Locations for Mirtazapine

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Mirtazapine
Location Trials
United States 82
China 10
Germany 7
Korea, Republic of 4
Denmark 3
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Mirtazapine
Location Trials
Texas 6
Pennsylvania 6
North Carolina 6
California 6
Alabama 6
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Clinical Trial Progress for Mirtazapine

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Mirtazapine
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 21
Phase 3 14
Phase 2/Phase 3 2
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Mirtazapine
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 37
Recruiting 12
Unknown status 7
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Mirtazapine

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Mirtazapine
Sponsor Trials
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) 5
Capital Medical University 3
University of Pittsburgh 3
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Mirtazapine
Sponsor Trials
Other 96
Industry 18
NIH 9
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