Get our Free Drug Patent Expiration Updates

Serving hundreds of leading biopharmaceutical companies globally:

Deloitte
Chubb
Baxter
AstraZeneca
US Department of Justice
McKesson
Boehringer Ingelheim
Accenture
Harvard Business School

Generated: December 16, 2018

DrugPatentWatch Database Preview

CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE

« Back to Dashboard

Clinical Trials for Labetalol Hydrochloride

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary
NCT00000291 Effects of Labetalol on Human Cocaine Use - 8 Completed University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute Phase 2 The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of labetalol treatment on the subjective and physiological effects of cocaine.
NCT00000291 Effects of Labetalol on Human Cocaine Use - 8 Completed National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Phase 2 The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of labetalol treatment on the subjective and physiological effects of cocaine.
NCT00000297 Effects of Labetalol on Nicotine Administration in Humans - 14 Completed University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute Phase 2 The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of labetalol in response to intravenous nicotine
NCT00000297 Effects of Labetalol on Nicotine Administration in Humans - 14 Completed National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Phase 2 The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of labetalol in response to intravenous nicotine
NCT00007592 Hypertension Screening and Treatment Program Completed VA Office of Research and Development N/A Hypertension is one of the most common medical problems in the United States and in the VA health care system. It has been well-documented that hypertension can be effectively treated. However, there remain important unresolved clinical questions in the area of antihypertensive treatment. For example, how much is mortality affected by visit compliance, blood pressure control and type of antihypertensive agent? Or, are some regimens associated with more morbidity than others? Or, are there inexpensive regimens that are as effective as more expensive regimens? The amount of data that is available from this demonstration project (currently 6,100 patients) will help address these questions. The answers to these questions should result in better care for veterans with hypertension.
NCT00194974 Treatment Targets for Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy Unknown status Weill Medical College of Cornell University Phase 1/Phase 2 This project is a clinical study of women with high blood pressure who become pregnant. Preeclampsia is a syndrome developing at the end of a pregnancy characterized by an abrupt rise in blood pressure (BP), blood clotting and kidney dysfunction, and may result in premature delivery, infant death, and maternal bleeding, kidney failure and stroke. The goal is to determine whether lowering blood pressure to a normal pressure of 120/80 is associated with a lower incidence of preeclampsia. Women who are completely healthy have a 5% chance of developing preeclampsia, however women with preexisting high blood pressure have a 25% chance of this complication. Several studies, including our own suggest that higher blood pressure early in pregnancy (<20 weeks) is associated with an even higher risk of preeclampsia. Currently we, the researchers at Weill Medical College of Cornell University, do not know how to treat women with high blood pressure and/or kidney disease during pregnancy. Keeping the BP in the normal range may be beneficial to the mother. On the other hand, we are not sure if the blood pressure lowering or the medications may or may not have adverse effects for the baby. Different trials to answer this question have been performed with no clear conclusions. Because of these uncertainties, we propose to compare two different strategies for treating women with high BP who become pregnant. We will treat half the women with BP medications to normalize BP (120-130/80 mm Hg) (experimental group) and the other half with the goal of keeping the BP slightly higher (140-150/90-100 mm Hg)(standard therapy group). We will determine which approach results in healthier pregnancies, and lower incidence of preeclampsia. Reducing the incidence of preeclampsia would be of significant benefit to both mothers and babies.
NCT00293735 Labetalol Versus Magnesium Sulfate (MgSO4) for the Prevention of Eclampsia Trial Suspended Baylor College of Medicine Phase 2/Phase 3 Eclampsia is a major cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology is not known but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler data suggest that overperfusion of the cerebral tissues is a major etiologic factor. Hypertensive encephalopathy from overperfusion, and vascular damage from excessive arterial pressure (cerebral barotrauma) are believed to lead to vasogenic and cytotoxic cerebral edema, with resultant neuronal anomalies, seizure activity and cerebral bleeding if left unchecked. Doppler data have shown that cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) is abnormally increased in severe preeclampsia and that autoregulation of the middle cerebral artery is affected by this condition leading to increased CPP. Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is the most widely accepted eclampsia treatment and prophylactic agent, and it has been used in the USA since the 1950's. Despite widespread use, its mechanism of action is unknown. MgSO4 is given intravenously or intramuscularly and requires specialized nursing training and monitoring to minimize toxicity from respiratory and cardiac depression. Labetalol, a combined alpha and beta blocker, has been used for many years to safely treat hypertension in preeclamptic women, and is now known to reduce CPP in women with preeclampsia. In the United Kingdom labetalol was for many years used as the sole agent in treating preeclampsia, and the rate of seizure was no different to that reported in the USA with MgSO4. Since labetalol can be administered orally, is economical, has low toxicity potential, does not require specialized training to administer or monitor, and decreases CPP, it may be an ideal agent for controlling blood pressure (BP) and decreasing the incidence of eclampsia in women with preeclampsia. The current study is a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial to compare the anti-seizure effect of parenteral MgSO4 versus oral labetalol in hypertensive pregnant women who are eligible for MgSO4 therapy. The primary outcome measure is eclampsia, and the secondary outcome measures include blood pressure control, and relevant antenatal, intrapartum, and postnatal maternal and fetal/neonatal parameters including adverse effects and complications. Inclusion criteria are deliberately broad in order to make the study clinically relevant. Hypertensive pregnant women, in whom the decision for delivery has been made, will be enrolled after written, informed consent. Patients will be randomized to receive MgSO4 therapy as given in their institution, versus oral labetalol (200mg/q6 hours), from enrollment in the study until 24 hours post delivery. There will be 4000 patients in each arm of the study and analysis will be by intention-to-treat. The study is powered to show both therapeutic superiority as well as clinical equivalence. This study has the potential to change the way preeclampsia is managed, and will represent a major advance in terms of the availability and safety of prophylactic therapy, especially in developing nations where MgSO4 is underutilized due to cost constraints.
Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary

This preview shows a limited data set.
Subscribe to access the full database, or try a Free Trial

Clinical Trial Conditions for Labetalol Hydrochloride

Condition Name

Condition Name for Labetalol Hydrochloride
Intervention Trials
Hypertension 5
Hypertension in Pregnancy 3
Preeclampsia 3
Pre-eclampsia 2
[disabled in preview] 0
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Export unavailable in trial.
Subscribe for complete access.

Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Labetalol Hydrochloride
Intervention Trials
Hypertension 13
Pre-Eclampsia 11
Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced 8
Eclampsia 6
[disabled in preview] 0
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Export unavailable in trial.
Subscribe for complete access.

Clinical Trial Locations for Labetalol Hydrochloride

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Labetalol Hydrochloride
Location Trials
United States 24
Canada 6
Egypt 4
Saudi Arabia 2
India 2
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Export unavailable in trial.
Subscribe for complete access.

Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Labetalol Hydrochloride
Location Trials
New York 5
California 4
Texas 2
Ohio 2
Minnesota 2
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Export unavailable in trial.
Subscribe for complete access.

Clinical Trial Progress for Labetalol Hydrochloride

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Labetalol Hydrochloride
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 13
Phase 3 5
Phase 2/Phase 3 3
[disabled in preview] 18
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Export unavailable in trial.
Subscribe for complete access.

Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Labetalol Hydrochloride
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 15
Recruiting 12
Not yet recruiting 5
[disabled in preview] 8
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Export unavailable in trial.
Subscribe for complete access.

Clinical Trial Sponsors for Labetalol Hydrochloride

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Labetalol Hydrochloride
Sponsor Trials
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center 3
Mansoura University 3
University of Alberta 3
[disabled in preview] 8
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Export unavailable in trial.
Subscribe for complete access.

Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Labetalol Hydrochloride
Sponsor Trials
Other 48
U.S. Fed 3
Industry 3
[disabled in preview] 2
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Export unavailable in trial.
Subscribe for complete access.

For more information try a trial or see the plans and pricing

Serving hundreds of leading biopharmaceutical companies globally:

US Department of Justice
Moodys
Argus Health
Julphar
Covington
Fuji
Merck
Johnson and Johnson
Mallinckrodt

Drugs may be covered by multiple patents or regulatory protections. All trademarks and applicant names are the property of their respective owners or licensors. Although great care is taken in the proper and correct provision of this service, thinkBiotech LLC does not accept any responsibility for possible consequences of errors or omissions in the provided data. The data presented herein is for information purposes only. There is no warranty that the data contained herein is error free. thinkBiotech performs no independent verifification of facts as provided by public sources nor are attempts made to provide legal or investing advice. Any reliance on data provided herein is done solely at the discretion of the user. Users of this service are advised to seek professional advice and independent confirmation before considering acting on any of the provided information. thinkBiotech LLC reserves the right to amend, extend or withdraw any part or all of the offered service without notice.