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Last Updated: November 14, 2019

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR IBUPROFEN

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505(b)(2) Clinical Trials for Ibuprofen

This table shows clinical trials for potential 505(b)(2) applications. See the next table for all clinical trials
Trial Type Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
OTC NCT00011063 Effect of Ginkgo Biloba on Phenytoin Elimination Completed National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC) Phase 1 2001-02-01 This study will examine how the herbal remedy ginkgo biloba may affect the body's elimination of other medicines. Many people take ginkgo biloba to improve memory, mental alertness and overall feeling of well being. Since this product is considered a food supplement and not a drug, it is not subject to the rigorous pre-market testing required for prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. As a result, information has not been collected on possible interactions between ginkgo biloba and other medications. This study will look at how ginkgo biloba affects the elimination of phenytoin-a medication used to treat patients with seizures. Normal healthy volunteers 21 years of age or older may be eligible for this 40-day study. Candidates will provide a medical history and undergo a physical examination and routine blood tests. Women of childbearing age must use a reliable form of birth control other than oral contraceptives ("the pill"). For at least 2 weeks before the study and throughout its duration, study participants may not have any of the following: 1) medications that can affect platelet function (e.g., aspirin, Motrin, Advil, Nuprin, ibuprofen, etc.); 2) alcoholic beverages; 3) grapefruit and grapefruit juice; and 4) all medications except those given by study personnel. On day 1 of the study, subjects take one 500-mg dose of phenytoin at 8:00 A.M.. On an empty stomach. (Subjects fast the night before taking the phenytoin and are allowed to eat breakfast 2 hours after the dose). Blood samples are drawn just before dosing and again at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24, 32, 48, 72 and 96 hours after the dose. Blood drawn on this first study day is collected through a catheter (small plastic tube) placed in a vein to avoid multiple needlesticks. After the 12-hour sample is collected, the subject goes home and then returns to the clinic for the remaining blood draws, which are taken by direct needlestick. When the blood sampling is completed, subjects begin ginkgo therapy. The NIH Clinical Center provides participants a supply of 60-mg capsules of ginkgo to take twice a day (at 8 A.M. and 8 P.M..) for 4 weeks. At the end of the 4 weeks, subjects are given a second dose of phenytoin as described above and repeat the blood sampling procedure. Subjects continue taking ginkgo during this second phenytoin study.
OTC NCT00245375 A Trial Comparing Combination Therapy of Acetaminophen Plus Ibuprofen Versus Tylenol #3 for the Treatment of Pain After Outpatient Surgery Completed McNeil Consumer & Specialty Pharmaceuticals, a Division of McNeil-PPC, Inc. N/A 2005-01-01 Increasingly in general surgery, the investigators are conducting outpatient day surgery. Ambulatory surgery currently comprises 60 to 70% of surgeries performed in North America. These patients all require some form of analgesia which can be taken at home in the first few days after the surgery. The current standard at the investigators' centre and many others in the maritime provinces is to provide a prescription for oral acetaminophen plus codeine or oxycodone (Tylenol #3®, Percocet ®). Some patients may receive more potent opioids such as oral hydromorphone (Dilaudid®). Unfortunately, the most commonly prescribed medication (Tylenol #3®) is often poorly tolerated by patients, has several undesirable side effects, and may not provide effective pain relief. In the investigators' experience, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are uncommonly a routine addition to the home analgesic regimen. Tylenol #3®, in the investigators' experience and opinion, is a poor post surgical pain medication. They hope to show that a combination of ibuprofen and acetaminophen is better for pain relief after these procedures. The combination of acetaminophen and ibuprofen would be a safe, cheap, and readily available regimen. Unfortunately, as the prescribing practices of surgeons are old habits, it will require a very convincing argument to get them to change their practices. A randomized controlled trial comparing these two regimens, the investigators hope, would be a powerful enough argument. The hypothesis of this study, therefore, is that the pain control provided by a combination of acetaminophen plus ibuprofen (650 mg/400 mg four times per day) will be superior to Tylenol #3® (600 mg acetaminophen/60 mg codeine/15 mg caffeine four times per day). This study will attempt to enroll 150 patients in total. Eligible patients will be identified by their attending surgeon and contacted by study personnel. Patients who enroll in the study will undergo their surgery in the usual manner. After the surgery, in the recovery room, once they are ready to go home, they will be randomized to receive combination A or B and be given a week's worth of pain medication. They will then go home and take this medication as directed. They will record their pain intensity and pain relief once per day using a diary provided in the study package. One week after their surgery, they will return to the hospital clinic and be seen by the study nurse. They will hand over the diary and any unused medication. They will also be asked several questions regarding their overall satisfaction, incidence of side effects, and how long until they were pain free. The risks of participating in this study are minimal from the risks inherent to the procedures and medications the patients would receive within the standard of care. Ibuprofen is a commonly used NSAID which is widely available over the counter and has an established safety profile. The most common adverse effects of ibuprofen and other NSAIDs are gastrointestinal bleeding and ulceration. Other less common adverse effects include nephrotoxicity, hypersensitivity reactions, hepatic dysfunction (longterm use), and cognitive dysfunction. The investigators' patients will be selected to exclude those most at risk for these complications (see exclusion criteria). Acetaminophen has few side effects, with no adverse effects on platelet function and no evidence of gastric irritation.
OTC NCT00245375 A Trial Comparing Combination Therapy of Acetaminophen Plus Ibuprofen Versus Tylenol #3 for the Treatment of Pain After Outpatient Surgery Completed Nova Scotia Health Authority N/A 2005-01-01 Increasingly in general surgery, the investigators are conducting outpatient day surgery. Ambulatory surgery currently comprises 60 to 70% of surgeries performed in North America. These patients all require some form of analgesia which can be taken at home in the first few days after the surgery. The current standard at the investigators' centre and many others in the maritime provinces is to provide a prescription for oral acetaminophen plus codeine or oxycodone (Tylenol #3®, Percocet ®). Some patients may receive more potent opioids such as oral hydromorphone (Dilaudid®). Unfortunately, the most commonly prescribed medication (Tylenol #3®) is often poorly tolerated by patients, has several undesirable side effects, and may not provide effective pain relief. In the investigators' experience, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are uncommonly a routine addition to the home analgesic regimen. Tylenol #3®, in the investigators' experience and opinion, is a poor post surgical pain medication. They hope to show that a combination of ibuprofen and acetaminophen is better for pain relief after these procedures. The combination of acetaminophen and ibuprofen would be a safe, cheap, and readily available regimen. Unfortunately, as the prescribing practices of surgeons are old habits, it will require a very convincing argument to get them to change their practices. A randomized controlled trial comparing these two regimens, the investigators hope, would be a powerful enough argument. The hypothesis of this study, therefore, is that the pain control provided by a combination of acetaminophen plus ibuprofen (650 mg/400 mg four times per day) will be superior to Tylenol #3® (600 mg acetaminophen/60 mg codeine/15 mg caffeine four times per day). This study will attempt to enroll 150 patients in total. Eligible patients will be identified by their attending surgeon and contacted by study personnel. Patients who enroll in the study will undergo their surgery in the usual manner. After the surgery, in the recovery room, once they are ready to go home, they will be randomized to receive combination A or B and be given a week's worth of pain medication. They will then go home and take this medication as directed. They will record their pain intensity and pain relief once per day using a diary provided in the study package. One week after their surgery, they will return to the hospital clinic and be seen by the study nurse. They will hand over the diary and any unused medication. They will also be asked several questions regarding their overall satisfaction, incidence of side effects, and how long until they were pain free. The risks of participating in this study are minimal from the risks inherent to the procedures and medications the patients would receive within the standard of care. Ibuprofen is a commonly used NSAID which is widely available over the counter and has an established safety profile. The most common adverse effects of ibuprofen and other NSAIDs are gastrointestinal bleeding and ulceration. Other less common adverse effects include nephrotoxicity, hypersensitivity reactions, hepatic dysfunction (longterm use), and cognitive dysfunction. The investigators' patients will be selected to exclude those most at risk for these complications (see exclusion criteria). Acetaminophen has few side effects, with no adverse effects on platelet function and no evidence of gastric irritation.
OTC NCT00267293 Ibuprofen Alone and in Combination With Acetaminophen for Treatment of Fever Completed Children Youth and Family Consortium Phase 4 2006-01-01 Currently, when a child has fever either ibuprofen (e.g. Motrin, Advil) or acetaminophen (e.g. Tylenol) is given. Both Ibuprofen and Acetaminophen are approved for over the counter use for treatment of fever by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This study hopes to determine whether giving both medications together is better than giving one medication alone for the treatment of fever.
>Trial Type >Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

All Clinical Trials for Ibuprofen

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00000574 Ibuprofen in Sepsis Study Completed National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Phase 3 1990-09-01 To determine the effects of ibuprofen on mortality, development and reversal of shock, and adult respiratory distress syndrome, and on Lung Parenchymal Injury Score in adult patients with serious infection.
NCT00000574 Ibuprofen in Sepsis Study Completed Vanderbilt University Medical Center Phase 3 1990-09-01 To determine the effects of ibuprofen on mortality, development and reversal of shock, and adult respiratory distress syndrome, and on Lung Parenchymal Injury Score in adult patients with serious infection.
NCT00000728 Phase I Trial of the Combination of Zidovudine and Recombinant Interleukin-2 in Patients With Persistent Generalized Lymphadenopathy Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 1 1969-12-31 To evaluate the short-term effects of administering zidovudine ( AZT ) at the same time with increasing doses of aldesleukin ( interleukin-2; IL-2 ) in patients with persistent generalized lymphadenopathy syndrome ( PGL ). The effects to be studied include safety or toxicity, how quickly the drugs are used in the body, effects on the immune system, effects on HIV, concentrations in body fluids, and how quickly the drugs are cleared by the kidneys. The trial will establish the maximum tolerated dose ( MTD ) and will be a pilot study to determine the dose that has the greatest effect in the immune system. AZT has been shown to be effective in HIV-related disease. IL-2 has been shown to increase immune responses and correct immune problems caused by HIV in the test tube. IL-2 has also been effective in treating Kaposi's sarcoma in a number of patients. Because of the clinical activities of these two drugs and because their toxicities and mechanisms of action do not overlap, it may be beneficial to combine the two drugs with their antiviral and immune stimulatory effects.
NCT00001005 A Study of Zidovudine Plus Interleukin-2 in HIV-Infected Patients Who Have No Symptoms of Infection But Who Have Tender Lymph Nodes Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 1 1969-12-31 AMENDED: To investigate whether subcutaneous (SC) injection of IL-2 produces biological responses which parallel those observed with IV dosing. Original design: To evaluate the short-term effects of combined administration of zidovudine (AZT) and increasing doses of recombinant interleukin-2 (aldesleukin; IL-2) in patients infected with HIV, who have lymphadenopathy, but who are otherwise asymptomatic (no other symptoms). The first phase of this clinical trial will establish maximum tolerated dose ( MTD ). How quickly the drugs get into the blood and how long they remain there (pharmacokinetics) will also be studied at each dose as well as the effect on HIV. Since AZT has no effect on cells that contain inactive virus (latently infected cells) and these cells may act as viral reservoirs, that a second agent that can destroy these infected cells would be useful in combination with AZT. The different activities of AZT and IL-2, as well as the non-overlapping nature of their mechanisms of action and toxicity, increase the theoretical benefits of combining AZT, a drug which has clinically significant activity in HIV-related disease but cannot eliminate infected cells, with IL-2, a drug which may enhance anti-HIV immunity, destroy chronically infected cells, and allow immune recognition of latently infected cells.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for Ibuprofen

Condition Name

Condition Name for Ibuprofen
Intervention Trials
Pain 89
Healthy 33
Pain, Postoperative 27
Patent Ductus Arteriosus 25
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Ibuprofen
Intervention Trials
Pain, Postoperative 69
Osteoarthritis 36
Ductus Arteriosus, Patent 35
Toothache 27
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Clinical Trial Locations for Ibuprofen

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Ibuprofen
Location Trials
United States 746
Canada 44
United Kingdom 41
Brazil 27
Germany 26
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Ibuprofen
Location Trials
California 55
Texas 54
Pennsylvania 43
New York 42
Utah 35
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Clinical Trial Progress for Ibuprofen

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Ibuprofen
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 179
Phase 3 120
Phase 2/Phase 3 22
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Ibuprofen
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 303
Recruiting 109
Not yet recruiting 98
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Ibuprofen

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Ibuprofen
Sponsor Trials
Pfizer 42
Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. 18
Cumberland Pharmaceuticals 17
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Ibuprofen
Sponsor Trials
Other 579
Industry 261
U.S. Fed 26
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