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Generated: December 14, 2018

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR DEMEROL

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Clinical Trials for Demerol

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary
NCT00154895 Additional Minocycline Pleurodesis After Thoracoscopic Procedures for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax Unknown status National Science Council, Taiwan Phase 3 To test if additional minocycline pleurodesis after thoracoscopic procedures can reduce the rates of ipsilateral recurrence for patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax.
NCT00154895 Additional Minocycline Pleurodesis After Thoracoscopic Procedures for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax Unknown status National Taiwan University Hospital Phase 3 To test if additional minocycline pleurodesis after thoracoscopic procedures can reduce the rates of ipsilateral recurrence for patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax.
NCT00240123 Effect of Benadryl Sedation During ERCP or EUS Withdrawn University of Rochester Phase 1 The purpose of the study is to determine if adding Benadryl improves sedation for patients scheduled to undergo ERCP or EUS procedures.
NCT00274170 Randomized Evaluation of Octreotide Versus Compazine for Emergency Department Treatment of Migraine Headache Unknown status C.R.Darnall Army Medical Center Phase 1/Phase 2 : Headaches are a common complaint presenting to the emergency department (ED), accounting for 1-2% of all ED visits, with migraines as the second most common primary headache syndrome. Patients that ultimately present to the ED have failed outpatient therapy and exhibit severe and persistent symptoms. Treatment options have been traditionally with a parenteral opiod, generally Demerol. Unfortunately, patients with chronic painful conditions like migraines have been prone to dependency. In 1986, a nonopioid, compazine was noted serendipitously to relieve migraine headache pain. 1 Nonopioid regimens have evolved as standard therapy in the treatment of migrainne headache in the ED. Today, there are a number of nonopioid treatment options, but not without their own individual concerns. Ergotamine and dihydroergotamine are effective, but commonly cause nausea and vomiting. Sumatriptan is expensive has recurrence rate, is ineffective in about 20-30%, and is contra-indicated in patients with cardiac disease. Metoclopramide, a dopamine receptor antagonist, commonly used as an anti-emetic agent, has been widely studied for use with acute migraines. Its side effects include drowsiness and dystonic reactions. Compazine has been successfully used to treat migraine headaches for the past several decades, and has been accepted as standard treatment of headaches in the ED. 2 Its side effect profile includes extrapyramidal effects, dysphoria, drowsiness and akathisias. The ideal medication for treating headaches would have no addictive properties, few side effects, quick onset, be highly effective and have a low rate of recurrence. Somatostatin is known to have an inhibitory effect on a number of neuropetides, which have been implicated in migraine. Native somatostatin is an unstable compound and is broken down in minutes, but octreotide, a somatostatin analogue has a longer half life. Intravenous somatostatin has been shown to be as effective as ergotamine in the acute treatment of cluster headache. 3 The analgesic effect of octreotide with headaches associated with growth hormone secreting tumor has been established. 4 Five somatostatin receptors have been cloned with octreotide acting predominantely on sst2 and sst5. The distribution of sst2 within the central nervous system strongly suggests that this particular somatostatin receptor has a role in cranial nociception, being highly expressed in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis and periaqueductal grey. Kapicioglu et.al performed a double blind study comparing octreotide to placebo in treating migraine. They found there to be a significantly greater relief of pain with octreotide at 2 and 6 hours compared to placebo (76% vs 25%, p<0.02). They noted that 47% of those in the octreotide group had complete relief compared to no patients in the placebo group. They went on to note that those patients in the octreotide group had earlier relief of symptoms and no side effects. The only minor adverse event related to the administration of octreotide was a local reaction in 3 patients (18%). In a study performed recently in Netherlands, no clinically relevant changes in vital signs, routine chemistry, and urinalysis were observed with octreotide use. Electrocardiogram analyses showed no newly occurring or worsening of known cardiac abnormalities 2 and 24 h after injection with octreotide. 5 Levy et. al also compared octreotide to placebo in a double blinded study but found no difference. This was a poorly designed study, in that the patients treated themselves at home with an injection of either placebo or octreotide for 2 episodes of headache and recorded their level of pain relief at 2 hours. Matharu et. al also performed a double blind study comparing octreotide to placebo, but looking at cluster headaches rather than migraines. They found there to be a significant improvement with the use of octreotide over placebo (52% vs 36%). At Darnall Army Community Hospital the cost of 100 mcg Octreotide and10 mg Compazine, is $10.46, $2.02-8.00, respectively.
NCT00583869 Role of Pregabalin in Treatment of Post-Op Pain in Fracture Patients Completed Pfizer Phase 0 This is a randomized, prospective, double-blind pilot study designed to evaluate the potential effectiveness of pregabalin in post-operative pain management for patients who have sustained a fracture.
NCT00583869 Role of Pregabalin in Treatment of Post-Op Pain in Fracture Patients Completed University of Alabama at Birmingham Phase 0 This is a randomized, prospective, double-blind pilot study designed to evaluate the potential effectiveness of pregabalin in post-operative pain management for patients who have sustained a fracture.
NCT00640159 Tolerability and Efficacy of Switch From Oral Selegiline to Orally Disintegrating Selegiline (Zelapar) in Patients With Parkinson's Disease Completed Baylor College of Medicine Phase 4 Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Symptomatic therapy is primarily aimed at restoring dopamine function in the brain. Oral selegiline in conjunction with L-dopa has been a mainstay of therapy for PD patients experiencing motor fluctuations for many years. The mechanisms accounting for selegiline's beneficial adjunctive action in the treatment of PD are not fully understood. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase (MAO) type B (MAO-B) activity is generally considered to be of primary importance. Oral selegiline has low bio-availability and is typically dosed BID, for a total of 5-10 mg daily. Recently, the FDA approved a new orally disintegration tablet (ODT) formulation of selegiline, called ZelaparTM. This new formulation utilizes Zydis technology to dissolve in the mouth, with absorption through the oral mucosa, thereby largely bypassing the gut and avoiding first pass hepatic metabolism. This allows more active drug to be delivered at a lower dose. Consequently, Zelapar is dosed once-daily, up to 2.5 mg per day. There are no empirical data indicating whether the use of the new approved formulation of selegiline ODT (Zelapar) is superior or preferred by patients compared to traditional oral selegiline. It is believed that clinical efficacy will be preserved or enhanced, by delivering more active drug, with improved patient preference for the ODT formulation due to the once-daily dosing . The effectiveness of orally disintegrating selegiline as an adjunct to carbidopa/levodopa in the treatment of PD was established in a multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial (n=140; 94 received orally disintegrating selegiline, 46 received placebo) of three months' duration. Patients randomized to orally disintegrating selegiline received a daily dose of 1.25 mg for the first 6 weeks and a daily dose of 2.5 mg for the last 6 weeks. Patients were all treated with levodopa and could additionally have been on dopamine agonists, anticholinergics, amantadine, or any combination of these during the trial. At 12 weeks, orally disintegrating selegiline-treated patients had an average of 2.2 hours per day less "OFF" time compared to baseline. Placebo treated patients had 0.6 hours per day less "OFF" time compared to baseline. These differences were significant (p < 0.001). Adverse events were very similar between drug and placebo.
Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary

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Clinical Trial Conditions for Demerol

Condition Name

Condition Name for Demerol
Intervention Trials
Cesarean Section Complications 1
Leukemia 1
Post-operative Pain 1
Cesarean Section 1
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Demerol
Intervention Trials
Headache 1
Leukemia 1
Pneumothorax 1
Graft vs Host Disease 1
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Clinical Trial Locations for Demerol

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Demerol
Location Trials
United States 14
Canada 2
Taiwan 1
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Demerol
Location Trials
Texas 3
Ohio 1
North Carolina 1
New York 1
Illinois 1
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Clinical Trial Progress for Demerol

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Demerol
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 2
Phase 3 2
Phase 2 1
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Demerol
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Unknown status 3
Completed 3
Recruiting 3
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Demerol

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Demerol
Sponsor Trials
M.D. Anderson Cancer Center 1
National Science Council, Taiwan 1
Baylor College of Medicine 1
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Demerol
Sponsor Trials
Other 11
Industry 1
U.S. Fed 1
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Serving hundreds of leading biopharmaceutical companies globally:

McKesson
Daiichi Sankyo
Colorcon
Citi
Julphar
Federal Trade Commission
Teva
Covington
Dow

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