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Last Updated: January 19, 2022

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR CYTOXAN

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505(b)(2) Clinical Trials for Cytoxan

This table shows clinical trials for potential 505(b)(2) applications. See the next table for all clinical trials
Trial Type Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
New Dosage NCT01760226 ↗ Dose Adjusted EPOCH-R, to Treat Mature B Cell Malignancies Completed National Cancer Institute (NCI) Early Phase 1 2013-01-01 The subject is invited to take part in this research study because s/he has been diagnosed with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), Primary Mediastinal B-cell Lymphoma (PMBCL), or Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD). In an attempt to improve cure rates while reducing harmful effects from drugs, oncologists are developing new treatment protocols. One such protocol, entitled dose-adjusted EPOCH-R, utilizes two major new strategies. First, the treatment approach utilizes continuous infusion of chemotherapy over four days, instead of being administered over minutes or hours. Secondly, the doses of some medications involved are increased or decreased based on how the drugs affect the subject's ability to produce blood cells, which is used as a measure of how rapidly the body is processing drugs. Using this approach in adults, researchers have shown improved cure rates in these cancers. Additionally, the harmful effects experienced by patients has been mild, with mucositis, severe infections, and tumor lysis syndrome occurring rarely. However, this new dosing method has never been used in children, and the effectiveness and side effects of this new method are unknown in children. The purpose of this study is to look at the safety of dose-adjusted EPOCH-R in the treatment of children with mature B-cell cancers, and to see if we can maintain cure rates (as has been shown in adults). This study represents the first trial of dose-adjusted EPOCH-R in children.
New Dosage NCT01760226 ↗ Dose Adjusted EPOCH-R, to Treat Mature B Cell Malignancies Completed Texas Children's Hospital Early Phase 1 2013-01-01 The subject is invited to take part in this research study because s/he has been diagnosed with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), Primary Mediastinal B-cell Lymphoma (PMBCL), or Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD). In an attempt to improve cure rates while reducing harmful effects from drugs, oncologists are developing new treatment protocols. One such protocol, entitled dose-adjusted EPOCH-R, utilizes two major new strategies. First, the treatment approach utilizes continuous infusion of chemotherapy over four days, instead of being administered over minutes or hours. Secondly, the doses of some medications involved are increased or decreased based on how the drugs affect the subject's ability to produce blood cells, which is used as a measure of how rapidly the body is processing drugs. Using this approach in adults, researchers have shown improved cure rates in these cancers. Additionally, the harmful effects experienced by patients has been mild, with mucositis, severe infections, and tumor lysis syndrome occurring rarely. However, this new dosing method has never been used in children, and the effectiveness and side effects of this new method are unknown in children. The purpose of this study is to look at the safety of dose-adjusted EPOCH-R in the treatment of children with mature B-cell cancers, and to see if we can maintain cure rates (as has been shown in adults). This study represents the first trial of dose-adjusted EPOCH-R in children.
New Dosage NCT01760226 ↗ Dose Adjusted EPOCH-R, to Treat Mature B Cell Malignancies Completed Baylor College of Medicine Early Phase 1 2013-01-01 The subject is invited to take part in this research study because s/he has been diagnosed with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), Primary Mediastinal B-cell Lymphoma (PMBCL), or Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD). In an attempt to improve cure rates while reducing harmful effects from drugs, oncologists are developing new treatment protocols. One such protocol, entitled dose-adjusted EPOCH-R, utilizes two major new strategies. First, the treatment approach utilizes continuous infusion of chemotherapy over four days, instead of being administered over minutes or hours. Secondly, the doses of some medications involved are increased or decreased based on how the drugs affect the subject's ability to produce blood cells, which is used as a measure of how rapidly the body is processing drugs. Using this approach in adults, researchers have shown improved cure rates in these cancers. Additionally, the harmful effects experienced by patients has been mild, with mucositis, severe infections, and tumor lysis syndrome occurring rarely. However, this new dosing method has never been used in children, and the effectiveness and side effects of this new method are unknown in children. The purpose of this study is to look at the safety of dose-adjusted EPOCH-R in the treatment of children with mature B-cell cancers, and to see if we can maintain cure rates (as has been shown in adults). This study represents the first trial of dose-adjusted EPOCH-R in children.
New Combination NCT03249831 ↗ A Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Sickle Cell Disease Recruiting California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) Phase 1 2019-01-04 Blood stem cells can produce red blood cells (which carry oxygen), white blood cells of the immune system (which fight infections) and platelets (which help the blood clot). Patients with sickle cell disease produce abnormal red blood cells. A blood stem cell transplant from a donor is a treatment option for patients with severe sickle cell disease. The donor can be healthy or have the sickle cell trait. The blood stem cell transplant will be given to the patient as an intravenous infusion (IV). The donor blood stem cells will then make normal red blood cells - as well as other types of blood cells - in the patient. When blood cells from two people co-exist in the patient, this is called mixed chimerism. Most children are successfully treated with blood stem cells from a sibling (brother/sister) who completely shares their tissue type (full-matched donor). However, transplant is not an option for patients who (1) have serious medical problems, and/or (2) do not have a full-matched donor. Most patients will have a relative who shares half of their tissue type (e.g. parent, child, and brother/sister) and can be a donor (half-matched or haploidentical donor). Adult patients with severe sickle cell disease were successfully treated with a half-matched transplant in a clinical study. Researchers would like to make half-matched transplant an option for more patients by (1) improving transplant success and (2) reducing transplanted-related complications. This research transplant is being tested in this Pilot study for the first time. It is different from a standard transplant because: 1. Half-matched related donors will be used, and 2. A new combination of drugs (chemotherapy) that does not completely wipe out the bone marrow cells (non-myeloablative treatment) will be used to prepare the patient for transplant, and 3. Most of the donor CD4+ T cells (a type of immune cells) will be removed (depleted) before giving the blood stem cell transplant to the patient to improve transplant outcomes. It is hoped that the research transplant: 1. Will reverse sickle cell disease and improve patient quality of life, 2. Will reduce side effects and help the patient recover faster from the transplant, 3. Help the patient keep the transplant longer and 4. Reduce serious transplant-related complications.
New Combination NCT03249831 ↗ A Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Sickle Cell Disease Recruiting City of Hope Medical Center Phase 1 2019-01-04 Blood stem cells can produce red blood cells (which carry oxygen), white blood cells of the immune system (which fight infections) and platelets (which help the blood clot). Patients with sickle cell disease produce abnormal red blood cells. A blood stem cell transplant from a donor is a treatment option for patients with severe sickle cell disease. The donor can be healthy or have the sickle cell trait. The blood stem cell transplant will be given to the patient as an intravenous infusion (IV). The donor blood stem cells will then make normal red blood cells - as well as other types of blood cells - in the patient. When blood cells from two people co-exist in the patient, this is called mixed chimerism. Most children are successfully treated with blood stem cells from a sibling (brother/sister) who completely shares their tissue type (full-matched donor). However, transplant is not an option for patients who (1) have serious medical problems, and/or (2) do not have a full-matched donor. Most patients will have a relative who shares half of their tissue type (e.g. parent, child, and brother/sister) and can be a donor (half-matched or haploidentical donor). Adult patients with severe sickle cell disease were successfully treated with a half-matched transplant in a clinical study. Researchers would like to make half-matched transplant an option for more patients by (1) improving transplant success and (2) reducing transplanted-related complications. This research transplant is being tested in this Pilot study for the first time. It is different from a standard transplant because: 1. Half-matched related donors will be used, and 2. A new combination of drugs (chemotherapy) that does not completely wipe out the bone marrow cells (non-myeloablative treatment) will be used to prepare the patient for transplant, and 3. Most of the donor CD4+ T cells (a type of immune cells) will be removed (depleted) before giving the blood stem cell transplant to the patient to improve transplant outcomes. It is hoped that the research transplant: 1. Will reverse sickle cell disease and improve patient quality of life, 2. Will reduce side effects and help the patient recover faster from the transplant, 3. Help the patient keep the transplant longer and 4. Reduce serious transplant-related complications.
>Trial Type >Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

All Clinical Trials for Cytoxan

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00001209 ↗ A Pilot Study for the Treatment of Patients With Metastatic and High Risk Sarcomas and Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors Completed National Cancer Institute (NCI) Phase 1 1986-10-01 This protocol is designed to test the feasibility of the administration of vincristine, adriamycin and cytoxan, alternating with the newly developed regimen ifosfamide VP-16 as well as the efficacy of this therapy in addition to radiotherapy in producing complete responses and disease-free survival in patients with Ewing's sarcoma, primitive sarcoma of bone, peripheral neuroepithelioma, and soft tissue sarcoma. This will not be a randomized study but will be comparable to the large data base of similar patients treated on successive Pediatric Branch studies.
NCT00001239 ↗ Combination Chemotherapy (FLAC) Combined With Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor in Locally Advanced and Metastatic Breast Cancer Completed National Cancer Institute (NCI) Phase 2 1989-07-01 To evaluate a dose intensive chemotherapy regimen for the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer using granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to ameliorate chemotherapy-induced toxicity. Combination chemotherapy consists of Flurouricil, Leucovorin, Adriamycin, and Cytoxan (FLAC) which will be given every 21 days for 10 cycles. This protocol will replace the phase I study of this regimen (MB-232/88-C-0207) which found the MTD of this regimen to be at the first dose level. This is a phase II study to determine response rates of this regimen in advanced breast cancer.
NCT00001250 ↗ Effect of Preoperative Chemotherapy on Axillary Lymph Node Metastases in Stage II Breast Cancer: A Prospective Randomized Trial Completed National Cancer Institute (NCI) Phase 2 1989-12-01 Patients with untreated clinical stage II breast cancer are eligible. An excisional biopsy of the primary tumor is acceptable, but without definitive local therapy or prior chemotherapy. Histologic confirmation of invasive carcinoma is required. Patients are prospectively randomized to receive five 21-day cycles of dose-intense (5-fluorouracil, adriamycin, leucovorin, cytoxan, granuloctye-colony stimulating factor [FLAC/G-CSF]) chemotherapy either before (preoperative) or after (postoperative) local therapy. Chemotherapy is given as an outpatient. For patients receiving preoperative chemotherapy, local therapy (modified radical mastectomy, or breast segmentectomy/axillary dissection/breast radiotherapy according to patient preference) is performed 3-4 weeks after last chemotherapy. For patients receiving postoperative chemotherapy, chemotherapy will begin 2-3 weeks after local therapy. Immediate reconstruction for mastectomy is acceptable. Upon completion of local therapy and chemotherapy in either treatment group, all estrogen receptor positive patients receive tamoxifen for 5 years. Follow-up consists of history and physical examination each 3 months for first 3 years, each six months for years 4 and 5, and yearly thereafter. Mammogram, bone scan, chest x-ray and blood work are performed yearly.
NCT00001269 ↗ Phase I Trial of FLAC (5-Fluorouracil, Leucovorin, Adriamycin, Cytoxan) Plus GM-CSF (Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor) Plus Dose Escalation of IL-3 (Interleukin-3) in Metastatic Breast Cancer Completed National Cancer Institute (NCI) Phase 1 1991-05-01 This is a phase I study to determine the maximal tolerated dose of IL-3 given alone or sequentially with GM-CSF following FLAC chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer patients.
NCT00001338 ↗ A Prospective, Randomized, Phase III Trial of FLAC (5-Fluorouracil, Leucovorin, Adriamycin, Cytoxan) Chemotherapy With GM-CSF (Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor) Versus PIXY 321 in Advanced Breast Cancer Completed National Cancer Institute (NCI) Phase 3 1993-06-01 This is a prospective, randomized Phase III trial of FLAC chemotherapy with GM-CSF versus PIXY321 in advanced breast cancer. The primary endpoints of this study will be the duration of thrombocytopenia and the time to recovery of platelets to 50,000/microliters. Other clinical endpoints will include the depth and duration of leukopenia, neutropenia, and anemia, the platelet and RBC transfusion requirements, and the number of documented instances of sepsis and hospitalizations for fever and neutropenia. Laboratory correlates will include the detailed evaluation of the effects on circulating hematopoietic progenitor cells by GM-CSF and PIXY321 and the potential effects these agents have on the bone marrow micro-environment. After 5 cycles of FLAC with GM-CSF versus PIXY321, patients will be treated with 5 cycles of 96 hour infusional taxol. The goal of this part of the study will be to assess the toxicity and feasibility of administering infusional taxol following dose-intensive FLAC chemotherapy.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for Cytoxan

Condition Name

Condition Name for Cytoxan
Intervention Trials
Leukemia 84
Breast Cancer 82
Lymphoma 79
Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia 54
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Cytoxan
Intervention Trials
Leukemia 253
Lymphoma 251
Leukemia, Lymphoid 186
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma 160
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Clinical Trial Locations for Cytoxan

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Cytoxan
Location Trials
Canada 510
New Zealand 57
Spain 51
Germany 9
United Kingdom 8
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Cytoxan
Location Trials
Texas 319
California 244
Maryland 219
New York 199
Washington 197
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Clinical Trial Progress for Cytoxan

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Cytoxan
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 4
Phase 3 111
Phase 2/Phase 3 18
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Cytoxan
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 395
Recruiting 182
Terminated 147
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Cytoxan

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Cytoxan
Sponsor Trials
National Cancer Institute (NCI) 461
M.D. Anderson Cancer Center 125
Children's Oncology Group 72
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Cytoxan
Sponsor Trials
Other 1171
NIH 514
Industry 299
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