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Last Updated: January 22, 2020

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR CHILDREN'S ADVIL

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505(b)(2) Clinical Trials for Children's Advil

This table shows clinical trials for potential 505(b)(2) applications. See the next table for all clinical trials
Trial Type Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
New Formulation NCT00000773 Phase I Safety and Pharmacokinetics Study of Microparticulate Atovaquone (m-Atovaquone; 566C80) in HIV-Infected and Perinatally Exposed Infants and Children Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 1 1969-12-31 To determine the safety, tolerance, and pharmacokinetics of a new improved microparticulate suspension formulation of atovaquone administered at one of two dose levels (per 09/30/94 amendment, a third dose level was added) daily for 12 days in HIV-infected and perinatally exposed (per 8/9/95 amendment) infants and children who are at risk of developing Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). Atovaquone has shown prophylactic potential in adults in the treatment of PCP but is poorly absorbed in tablet form. To improve the bioavailability of atovaquone, a new formulation has been prepared as a microparticulate suspension. Since studies in adults have demonstrated substantial safety of this drug, evaluation in children is being pursued.
New Formulation NCT00001736 New Cysteamine Eye Drops Formulation to Treat Corneal Crystals in Cystinosis Completed National Eye Institute (NEI) Phase 1 1998-05-01 This study will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a new formulation of eye drops used to treat cystine crystals that form in the corneas of patients with cystinosis. Cystinosis is an inherited disease caused by a defective enzyme, in which excessive amounts of the amino acid cystine accumulate in the body. Among others, symptoms include poor growth and development of kidney failure. In addition, after 10 to 20 years, the cornea-the outside covering of the eye over the iris and pupils-becomes so packed with cystine crystals that small, painful breaks may develop. This corneal condition is treated with cysteamine eye drops. This study is designed to provide additional information about this medication that the Food and Drug Administration requires before approving it for marketing. The study will examine, in two separate but simultaneous investigations, the safety and effectiveness of a new cysteamine formulation. In both studies, before treatment begins, patients will have a complete eye examination, and photographs of the eye will be taken using a bright flash. Safety Study Children and adults currently enrolled in a cystinosis study at the National Institutes of Health may participate in this trial. They will receive the current cysteamine formulation in one eye and the new preparation in the other eye. The drops will be given every hour during waking hours. Patients will be observed daily for the first week of treatment and will be called at 2 weeks and 4 weeks to check on side effects, if any. At 6 months, they will undergo a repeat eye examination. Patients (or their parents) will keep a daily diary recording the condition of each eye. Effectiveness Study Children and adults from Ann Arbor, Michigan, LaJolla, California, and the NEI clinic may be enrolled in this study. Participants will receive medication as described above for the safety trial. They will be observed daily for the first week and will have repeat eye examinations, including photographs, at months 3, 6, 9 and 12 to see if the crystals have decreased. Patients will keep a daily diary of the condition of both eyes.
New Formulation NCT00054756 Study of Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone in Normal Volunteers and in Patients With Thyroid or Pituitary Abnormalities Suspended National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Phase 2 2003-02-01 This study will determine the safety and activity of a new formulation of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), a drug used for diagnosing and evaluating patients with certain thyroid gland abnormalities. Normal thyroid gland function depends on proper chemical signaling between the thyroid gland, the hypothalamus (the part of the brain where TRH is made), and the pituitary (another part of the brain). The TRH test helps assess this interaction. Production of the only FDA-approved preparation of TRH was stopped in July 2002. As a result, to have a continuous source of TRH available for NIH clinical and research purposes, the NIH Clinical Center (CC) Pharmacy Department produced a pharmaceutical grade formulation of TRH for patient use. This study will test the CC formulation in healthy volunteers to show that its activity and side effects are similar to those of the previously available commercial test preparation. It will then be studied in CC patients for whom the diagnostic test is recommended. Healthy volunteers between 18 and 65 years of age and all patients requiring TRH evaluation of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid gland interaction may be eligible for this study. Patients include those with pituitary reserve, inconsistent thyroid function test, inappropriate TSH secretion, or pre- and post-operative evaluation of pituitary tumors. Normal volunteers will be screened with a medical history, physical examination, and blood tests. Women of child-bearing potential will be given a pregnancy test; pregnant and breast-feeding women may not participate. The TRH test procedure will be the same for healthy volunteers and patients. All participants fast from midnight before the morning of the test. In the morning, a catheter (flexible plastic tube) is inserted into an arm vein for easy injection of the TRH and collection of blood samples. Blood pressure is monitored before and during the test. A blood sample is drawn, and then TRH is given through the catheter over a 1-minute period. Another nine blood samples are collected over a 3-hour period from the time of the TRH injection for measuring levels of various hormones. A total of less than 4 tablespoons of blood is taken for the test.
OTC NCT00124787 A Trial Comparing the Effect of Oral Dimenhydrinate Versus Placebo in Children With Gastroenteritis Completed Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians Phase 4 2005-04-01 Dimenhydrinate, an over-the-counter, widely used drug in Canada, is an ethanolamine-derivative anti-histamine. It limits the stimulation of the vomiting center by the vestibular system, which is rich in histamine receptors. Multiple studies have shown its effectiveness in treatment of post-operative nausea and vomiting in children. It is also used for treatment of vertigo in children. Furthermore, it has the potential to be much more cost-effective than ondansetron, with an average cost of $0.90 US per dose . Its principal side effects are drowsiness, dizziness and anticholinergic symptoms. Restlessness and insomnia have also been described in children. To date, there has been no published data on the efficacy of dimenhydrinate in controlling emesis in children with acute gastroenteritis. RESEARCH QUESTION Do children treated with oral dimenhydrinate during acute gastro-enteritis experience less vomiting episodes than children treated with placebo?
OTC NCT00124787 A Trial Comparing the Effect of Oral Dimenhydrinate Versus Placebo in Children With Gastroenteritis Completed St. Justine's Hospital Phase 4 2005-04-01 Dimenhydrinate, an over-the-counter, widely used drug in Canada, is an ethanolamine-derivative anti-histamine. It limits the stimulation of the vomiting center by the vestibular system, which is rich in histamine receptors. Multiple studies have shown its effectiveness in treatment of post-operative nausea and vomiting in children. It is also used for treatment of vertigo in children. Furthermore, it has the potential to be much more cost-effective than ondansetron, with an average cost of $0.90 US per dose . Its principal side effects are drowsiness, dizziness and anticholinergic symptoms. Restlessness and insomnia have also been described in children. To date, there has been no published data on the efficacy of dimenhydrinate in controlling emesis in children with acute gastroenteritis. RESEARCH QUESTION Do children treated with oral dimenhydrinate during acute gastro-enteritis experience less vomiting episodes than children treated with placebo?
OTC NCT00127686 Effect of Honey and Dextromethorphan on Nocturnal Cough and Sleep Completed National Honey Board Phase 1 2005-09-01 Cough is the most common reason for an acute care doctor's visit in the United States. Cough can affect sleep for both coughing children and their parents. The American Academy of Pediatrics does not endorse the use of dextromethorphan (DM), the most common over-the-counter (OTC) cough medication because of a lack of efficacy data and some potential for toxicity, particularly when taken in excess. In fact, DM has previously been shown to be no better than a placebo for cough in children. Therefore, alternative, therapeutic agents are needed. Honey anecdotally provides relief for symptoms due to upper respiratory tract infection (URI). This study seeks to use a survey to evaluate whether a single dose of honey and/or DM is better than no treatment at all for controlling nocturnal cough in children with URI and the effect of the treatments on sleep quality for coughing children and their parents. A single dose of honey or DM will be superior to no treatment for control of nocturnal cough due to upper URI as rated by both parents and children and will improve the sleep quality for those children and parents. Compared to DM, honey will be superior for controlling nocturnal cough due to upper URI (also based on child and parental report).
OTC NCT00127686 Effect of Honey and Dextromethorphan on Nocturnal Cough and Sleep Completed Penn State University Phase 1 2005-09-01 Cough is the most common reason for an acute care doctor's visit in the United States. Cough can affect sleep for both coughing children and their parents. The American Academy of Pediatrics does not endorse the use of dextromethorphan (DM), the most common over-the-counter (OTC) cough medication because of a lack of efficacy data and some potential for toxicity, particularly when taken in excess. In fact, DM has previously been shown to be no better than a placebo for cough in children. Therefore, alternative, therapeutic agents are needed. Honey anecdotally provides relief for symptoms due to upper respiratory tract infection (URI). This study seeks to use a survey to evaluate whether a single dose of honey and/or DM is better than no treatment at all for controlling nocturnal cough in children with URI and the effect of the treatments on sleep quality for coughing children and their parents. A single dose of honey or DM will be superior to no treatment for control of nocturnal cough due to upper URI as rated by both parents and children and will improve the sleep quality for those children and parents. Compared to DM, honey will be superior for controlling nocturnal cough due to upper URI (also based on child and parental report).
>Trial Type >Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

All Clinical Trials for Children's Advil

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00000102 Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Calcium Channels as Therapeutic Targets Completed National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) Phase 1/Phase 2 1969-12-31 This study will test the ability of extended release nifedipine (Procardia XL), a blood pressure medication, to permit a decrease in the dose of glucocorticoid medication children take to treat congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH).
NCT00000115 Randomized Trial of Acetazolamide for Uveitis-Associated Cystoid Macular Edema Completed National Eye Institute (NEI) Phase 2 1990-12-01 To test the efficacy of acetazolamide for the treatment of uveitis-associated cystoid macular edema.
NCT00000170 Occlusion Versus Pharmacologic Therapy for Moderate Amblyopia Completed National Eye Institute (NEI) Phase 3 1999-04-01 - To determine whether the success rate with drug treatment (atropine) of amblyopia due to strabismus or anisometropia in patients less than 7 years old is equivalent to the success rate with occlusion (patching) therapy - To develop more precise estimates of the success rates of amblyopia treatment - To identify factors that may be associated with successful treatment of amblyopia - To collect data on the course of treated amblyopia to provide more precise estimates of treatment effects than are now available Extended Follow up of Study Patients - Primary: To determine the long-term visual acuity outcome at age 10 years and at age 15 years in patients diagnosed with amblyopia before age 7 years. - Secondary: To determine whether the long-term visual acuity outcome at age 10 years and at age 15 years differs between patients who received patching followed by best clinical care and patients who received atropine followed by best clinical care
NCT00000170 Occlusion Versus Pharmacologic Therapy for Moderate Amblyopia Completed Jaeb Center for Health Research Phase 3 1999-04-01 - To determine whether the success rate with drug treatment (atropine) of amblyopia due to strabismus or anisometropia in patients less than 7 years old is equivalent to the success rate with occlusion (patching) therapy - To develop more precise estimates of the success rates of amblyopia treatment - To identify factors that may be associated with successful treatment of amblyopia - To collect data on the course of treated amblyopia to provide more precise estimates of treatment effects than are now available Extended Follow up of Study Patients - Primary: To determine the long-term visual acuity outcome at age 10 years and at age 15 years in patients diagnosed with amblyopia before age 7 years. - Secondary: To determine whether the long-term visual acuity outcome at age 10 years and at age 15 years differs between patients who received patching followed by best clinical care and patients who received atropine followed by best clinical care
NCT00000363 Acute Otitis Media: Adjuvant Therapy to Improve Outcome Completed National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Phase 3 1969-12-31 Acute otitis media is one of the most common diseases of childhood and is one of the major causes of hearing loss in children. Despite the availability of effective antibiotic therapy for otitis media, treatment failures, persistent effusions, and recurrences are common. This Phase III outpatient study aims to test whether adjuvant therapy (an antihistamine or a corticosteroid), in addition to antibiotic therapy, improves the acute and long-term outcomes of patients with acute otitis media. This study is targeted to recruiting 200 infants (age less than one year); patient (and parent) participation is estimated to continue for one year after enrollment.
NCT00000381 Fluoxetine for Anxious Children Completed National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Phase 3 1997-06-01 The purpose of this study is to see if it is safe and effective to use fluoxetine to treat children and adolescents with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). Anxiety disorders are one of the most common psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents, and can cause disturbances in the child's school, social, and family lives. Having an anxiety disorder puts a child at risk for depression and drug abuse, and appears to continue into adulthood. There is very little information on anxiety medications for children. Children will be assigned randomly (like tossing a coin) to receive either fluoxetine or an inactive placebo for 12 weeks. Each child will be monitored for symptoms and side effects throughout the study. He/she will have blood tests at Weeks 4, 8, and 12 to measure drug levels in the blood. The study will last for 12 weeks. A child is eligible for this study if he/she: Is 8 to 17 years old and has anxiety disorder. A child will not be eligible for this study if he/she: Has current major depression, panic disorder, or obsessive-compulsive disorder, or abuses alcohol or drugs.
NCT00000381 Fluoxetine for Anxious Children Completed University of Pittsburgh Phase 3 1997-06-01 The purpose of this study is to see if it is safe and effective to use fluoxetine to treat children and adolescents with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). Anxiety disorders are one of the most common psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents, and can cause disturbances in the child's school, social, and family lives. Having an anxiety disorder puts a child at risk for depression and drug abuse, and appears to continue into adulthood. There is very little information on anxiety medications for children. Children will be assigned randomly (like tossing a coin) to receive either fluoxetine or an inactive placebo for 12 weeks. Each child will be monitored for symptoms and side effects throughout the study. He/she will have blood tests at Weeks 4, 8, and 12 to measure drug levels in the blood. The study will last for 12 weeks. A child is eligible for this study if he/she: Is 8 to 17 years old and has anxiety disorder. A child will not be eligible for this study if he/she: Has current major depression, panic disorder, or obsessive-compulsive disorder, or abuses alcohol or drugs.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for Children's Advil

Condition Name

Condition Name for Children's Advil
Intervention Trials
Asthma 241
HIV Infections 177
Malaria 154
Leukemia 146
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Children's Advil
Intervention Trials
Leukemia 363
Disease 353
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity 301
Syndrome 293
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Clinical Trial Locations for Children's Advil

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Children's Advil
Location Trials
France 540
Germany 520
United Kingdom 508
Australia 481
Italy 438
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Children's Advil
Location Trials
New York 926
Ohio 866
Pennsylvania 837
Florida 706
Massachusetts 674
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Clinical Trial Progress for Children's Advil

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Children's Advil
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 1384
Phase 3 1659
Phase 2/Phase 3 279
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Children's Advil
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 3517
Recruiting 1476
Not yet recruiting 873
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Children's Advil

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Children's Advil
Sponsor Trials
National Cancer Institute (NCI) 423
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) 203
M.D. Anderson Cancer Center 194
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Children's Advil
Sponsor Trials
Other 8563
Industry 2633
NIH 1260
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