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Last Updated: January 20, 2020

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR BALANCED SALT

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505(b)(2) Clinical Trials for Balanced Salt

This table shows clinical trials for potential 505(b)(2) applications. See the next table for all clinical trials
Trial Type Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
New Formulation NCT00741741 TMC278-TiDP15-C150: Trial to Examine Safety, Tolerability and Plasma Pharmacokinetics of Multiple Doses of TMC278LA. Terminated Tibotec Pharmaceuticals, Ireland Phase 1 2008-07-01 The purpose of this study is: to determine the safety, (local) tolerability and plasma exposure over time of single intramuscular (IM) doses of 600 and 1200 mg of a new formulation (F006) of TMC278LA, to determine the safety, (local) tolerability and long-term plasma exposure over time of 2 dose regimens of 4 monthly IM doses of a new formulation (F006) of TMC278LA., To determine the safety, (local) tolerability and long-term plasma exposure over time of 1 dose regimen of 4 monthly subcutaneous (SC) doses of a new formulation (F006) of TMC278LA.
New Formulation NCT01648257 Relative Bioavailability Study of GSK1265744 Formulations Completed ViiV Healthcare Phase 1 2012-08-01 This is a single-center, randomized, open-label, balanced, 3 way crossover study (3 periods) in healthy adult subjects. During each period, subjects will receive a single dose of GSK1265744 oral formulation in the fasted state and serial PK sampling for up to 168 hours (8 days) and safety assessments will be performed. Each period will be separated by a washout period of at least 14 days and a follow-up visit will occur 10 to 14 days after the last dose of study drug.
OTC NCT02137213 Feasibility Study of Oral Naloxone for Treatment of Methadone-induced Constipation Completed Academic Health Science Centres Phase 2 2014-08-01 At least 30% of patients receiving methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) are suffering from constipation that often affects effectiveness of MMT and increases its impact on health care system. Existing treatments include several over-the-counter medications which do not target the pathobiological basis of opioid-induced constipation and have limited effectiveness. At the same time well-known medication, naloxone, was already shown to help with constipation in patients receiving methadone for chronic pain, but was never tried in patients receiving methadone for opioid dependence. This study is aimed to try naloxone for treatment of opioid-induced constipation in MMT settings. The investigators will enroll 20 patients receiving MMT and suffering from opioid-induced constipation. The study has a crossover design - all patients will receive one week of their regular methadone doses and one week of their regular methadone doses with naloxone added. Normal saline will be added to methadone-only formulations as placebo. Order of the weeks will be chosen randomly. Both subjects and investigators will be blinded to the study condition (i.e. whether naloxone or normal saline is added to methadone preparation on a given week). Primary hypothesis: Patients receiving combination of oral methadone/naloxone in ratio 50:1 will have less severe symptoms of constipation compared to those receiving methadone only. Secondary hypothesis: Addition of oral naloxone to methadone in a ratio 50:1 will not cause clinically significant opioid withdrawal symptoms.
OTC NCT02137213 Feasibility Study of Oral Naloxone for Treatment of Methadone-induced Constipation Completed Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Phase 2 2014-08-01 At least 30% of patients receiving methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) are suffering from constipation that often affects effectiveness of MMT and increases its impact on health care system. Existing treatments include several over-the-counter medications which do not target the pathobiological basis of opioid-induced constipation and have limited effectiveness. At the same time well-known medication, naloxone, was already shown to help with constipation in patients receiving methadone for chronic pain, but was never tried in patients receiving methadone for opioid dependence. This study is aimed to try naloxone for treatment of opioid-induced constipation in MMT settings. The investigators will enroll 20 patients receiving MMT and suffering from opioid-induced constipation. The study has a crossover design - all patients will receive one week of their regular methadone doses and one week of their regular methadone doses with naloxone added. Normal saline will be added to methadone-only formulations as placebo. Order of the weeks will be chosen randomly. Both subjects and investigators will be blinded to the study condition (i.e. whether naloxone or normal saline is added to methadone preparation on a given week). Primary hypothesis: Patients receiving combination of oral methadone/naloxone in ratio 50:1 will have less severe symptoms of constipation compared to those receiving methadone only. Secondary hypothesis: Addition of oral naloxone to methadone in a ratio 50:1 will not cause clinically significant opioid withdrawal symptoms.
New Indication NCT03257423 Acute Appendicitis and Microbiota - Etiology of Appendicitis and Antibiotic Therapy Effects Enrolling by invitation Helsinki University Central Hospital N/A 2017-04-04 Appendicectomy has been the treatment of acute appendicitis for over a hundred years. Appendicectomy, however, includes operative and postoperative risks despite being a routine procedure. Several studies have proved promising results of the safety and efficiency of antibiotics in the treatment of acute uncomplicated appendicitis. The previous APPAC study by the investigators, published in 2015 in the Journal of American Medical Association, also proved promising results with 73% of patients with uncomplicated appendicitis treated successfully with antibiotics. None of the patients initially treated with antibiotics that later had appendectomy had major complications. The results of the APPAC trial suggest that CT proven uncomplicated acute appendicitis is not a surgical emergency and antibiotic therapy is a safe first-line treatment option. Reducing unnecessary appendectomies has also been shown to lead to significant economic savings. On the other hand, antibiotic therapies have been shown to have an effect on the normal gut microbiota and are considered an increasing global health threat underlining the importance of evaluating both short- and long-term effects of the antimicrobial treatment in old and new indications. The aims of this randomized prospective study are: 1. To evaluate the possible role and differences in the microbiological etiology of complicated and uncomplicated appendicitis. 2. To determine the effects of both antibiotic and placebo treatment on the composition of gut microbiota, and to evaluate how it recovers after the appendicitis-related antimicrobial treatment (AMT) 3. To evaluate the effects of the duration of the hospital stay on the AMR reservoir of the gut microbiota.
New Indication NCT03257423 Acute Appendicitis and Microbiota - Etiology of Appendicitis and Antibiotic Therapy Effects Enrolling by invitation Jyväskylä Central Hospital N/A 2017-04-04 Appendicectomy has been the treatment of acute appendicitis for over a hundred years. Appendicectomy, however, includes operative and postoperative risks despite being a routine procedure. Several studies have proved promising results of the safety and efficiency of antibiotics in the treatment of acute uncomplicated appendicitis. The previous APPAC study by the investigators, published in 2015 in the Journal of American Medical Association, also proved promising results with 73% of patients with uncomplicated appendicitis treated successfully with antibiotics. None of the patients initially treated with antibiotics that later had appendectomy had major complications. The results of the APPAC trial suggest that CT proven uncomplicated acute appendicitis is not a surgical emergency and antibiotic therapy is a safe first-line treatment option. Reducing unnecessary appendectomies has also been shown to lead to significant economic savings. On the other hand, antibiotic therapies have been shown to have an effect on the normal gut microbiota and are considered an increasing global health threat underlining the importance of evaluating both short- and long-term effects of the antimicrobial treatment in old and new indications. The aims of this randomized prospective study are: 1. To evaluate the possible role and differences in the microbiological etiology of complicated and uncomplicated appendicitis. 2. To determine the effects of both antibiotic and placebo treatment on the composition of gut microbiota, and to evaluate how it recovers after the appendicitis-related antimicrobial treatment (AMT) 3. To evaluate the effects of the duration of the hospital stay on the AMR reservoir of the gut microbiota.
New Indication NCT03257423 Acute Appendicitis and Microbiota - Etiology of Appendicitis and Antibiotic Therapy Effects Enrolling by invitation Kuopio University Hospital N/A 2017-04-04 Appendicectomy has been the treatment of acute appendicitis for over a hundred years. Appendicectomy, however, includes operative and postoperative risks despite being a routine procedure. Several studies have proved promising results of the safety and efficiency of antibiotics in the treatment of acute uncomplicated appendicitis. The previous APPAC study by the investigators, published in 2015 in the Journal of American Medical Association, also proved promising results with 73% of patients with uncomplicated appendicitis treated successfully with antibiotics. None of the patients initially treated with antibiotics that later had appendectomy had major complications. The results of the APPAC trial suggest that CT proven uncomplicated acute appendicitis is not a surgical emergency and antibiotic therapy is a safe first-line treatment option. Reducing unnecessary appendectomies has also been shown to lead to significant economic savings. On the other hand, antibiotic therapies have been shown to have an effect on the normal gut microbiota and are considered an increasing global health threat underlining the importance of evaluating both short- and long-term effects of the antimicrobial treatment in old and new indications. The aims of this randomized prospective study are: 1. To evaluate the possible role and differences in the microbiological etiology of complicated and uncomplicated appendicitis. 2. To determine the effects of both antibiotic and placebo treatment on the composition of gut microbiota, and to evaluate how it recovers after the appendicitis-related antimicrobial treatment (AMT) 3. To evaluate the effects of the duration of the hospital stay on the AMR reservoir of the gut microbiota.
>Trial Type >Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

All Clinical Trials for Balanced Salt

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00000574 Ibuprofen in Sepsis Study Completed National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Phase 3 1990-09-01 To determine the effects of ibuprofen on mortality, development and reversal of shock, and adult respiratory distress syndrome, and on Lung Parenchymal Injury Score in adult patients with serious infection.
NCT00000574 Ibuprofen in Sepsis Study Completed Vanderbilt University Medical Center Phase 3 1990-09-01 To determine the effects of ibuprofen on mortality, development and reversal of shock, and adult respiratory distress syndrome, and on Lung Parenchymal Injury Score in adult patients with serious infection.
NCT00000677 SCH 39304 as Therapy for Acute Cryptococcal Meningitis in HIV-Infected Patients Followed by Maintenance Therapy Completed Schering-Plough Phase 1 1969-12-31 To assess the safety and effectiveness of SCH 39304 as primary treatment of acute cryptococcal meningitis in HIV-infected patients. Safety and effectiveness of maintenance therapy following successful treatment of acute disease are also evaluated. Cryptococcal meningitis is a significant cause of illness and death in HIV-infected patients. Intravenous amphotericin B is effective for acute disease but relapse occurs in the majority of patients. Maintenance therapy is recommended but must be balanced against the multiple toxicities of the drugs used and the problems associated with the weekly administration of intravenous therapy. Treatments that are equally or more effective and less toxic than traditional methods are needed, especially oral therapy. SCH 39304 is an orally active antifungal drug that in animal studies is active against a wide range of systemic fungal infections including infections due to Cryptococcus. Features of SCH 39304 suggest that it might be of value in the treatment of cryptococcal meningitis.
NCT00000677 SCH 39304 as Therapy for Acute Cryptococcal Meningitis in HIV-Infected Patients Followed by Maintenance Therapy Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 1 1969-12-31 To assess the safety and effectiveness of SCH 39304 as primary treatment of acute cryptococcal meningitis in HIV-infected patients. Safety and effectiveness of maintenance therapy following successful treatment of acute disease are also evaluated. Cryptococcal meningitis is a significant cause of illness and death in HIV-infected patients. Intravenous amphotericin B is effective for acute disease but relapse occurs in the majority of patients. Maintenance therapy is recommended but must be balanced against the multiple toxicities of the drugs used and the problems associated with the weekly administration of intravenous therapy. Treatments that are equally or more effective and less toxic than traditional methods are needed, especially oral therapy. SCH 39304 is an orally active antifungal drug that in animal studies is active against a wide range of systemic fungal infections including infections due to Cryptococcus. Features of SCH 39304 suggest that it might be of value in the treatment of cryptococcal meningitis.
NCT00001422 A Controlled Trial of Intermittent Fludarabine for Psoriatic Arthritis Completed National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) Phase 2 1995-06-01 This is a placebo controlled study evaluating the role of fludarabine (a nucleoside analog targeting both resting and proliferating lymphocytes) in the treatment of moderate to severe psoriotic arthritis. Patients should have failed at least one disease modifying antirheumatic drug.
NCT00001958 Hydroxyurea to Treat Beta-Thalassemia (Cooley's Anemia) Completed National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Phase 2 1999-12-01 This 12-month study will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of hydroxyurea in treating beta-thalassemia, a type of anemia caused by defective hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying pigment in blood). Hemoglobin is composed of two protein chains-alpha globin chains and beta globin chains; patients with beta-thalassemia do not make beta globin. Patients often require frequent red blood cell transfusions. This leads to iron overload, which, in turn, requires iron chelation therapy (removal of iron from the blood). Some drugs, including hydroxyurea, can stimulate production of a third type of protein chain called gamma chains. In the womb, the fetus makes this type of protein instead of beta globin. It is not until after birth, when the fetus no longer produces gamma globin that the beta globin deficiency becomes apparent. Gamma chain synthesis improves hemoglobin and red blood cell production, correcting the anemia. This study will determine if and at what dose hydroxyurea treatment reduces patients' need for red blood cell transfusions and whether certain factors might predict which patients are likely benefit from this treatment. Patients 15 years and older with moderately severe beta-thalassemia may be eligible for this study. Participants will take hydroxyurea daily at a dose calculated according to the patient's body size. Blood will be drawn weekly to measure blood cell and platelet counts. The drug dosage may be increased after 12 weeks of treatment and again after 24 weeks if the white cell and platelet counts remain stable. Patients who respond dramatically to treatment may continue to receive hydroxyurea for up to 3 years.
NCT00002236 A Study to Find the Best Dosing Schedule for Delavirdine, Zidovudine, and Indinavir in HIV-Positive Patients Completed Pharmacia and Upjohn N/A 1969-12-31 The purpose of this study is to see whether it is better to take delavirdine (DLV) plus indinavir (IDV) plus zidovudine (ZDV) twice a day or three times a day.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for Balanced Salt

Condition Name

Condition Name for Balanced Salt
Intervention Trials
Healthy 166
Fasting 16
Fed 14
Anesthesia 10
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Balanced Salt
Intervention Trials
Alcoholism 13
HIV Infections 12
Syndrome 11
Shock, Septic 11
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Clinical Trial Locations for Balanced Salt

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Balanced Salt
Location Trials
United States 538
India 160
Italy 62
Canada 48
Germany 47
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Balanced Salt
Location Trials
New York 39
California 34
Texas 34
Florida 27
Ohio 26
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Clinical Trial Progress for Balanced Salt

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Balanced Salt
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 127
Phase 3 93
Phase 2/Phase 3 22
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Balanced Salt
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 478
Recruiting 108
Not yet recruiting 94
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Balanced Salt

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Balanced Salt
Sponsor Trials
Dr. Reddy's Laboratories Limited 88
Ranbaxy Laboratories Limited 58
GlaxoSmithKline 28
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Balanced Salt
Sponsor Trials
Other 631
Industry 449
NIH 46
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