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Generated: December 18, 2018

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR ATRACURIUM BESYLATE

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Clinical Trials for Atracurium Besylate

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary
NCT02861716 Intrathecal Dexmedetomidine Versus Fentanyl With Bupivacaine in Children Undergoing Major Abdominal Cancer Surgery Recruiting South Egypt Cancer Institute Phase 2 In this study the investigators aim to determine the analgesic effect and side effects of intrathecal fentanyl and dexmedetomidine as adjuvant to local anesthetics in pediatric patients undergoing major abdominal cancer surgeries.
NCT03005860 Effect of TIVA Propofol vs Sevoflurane Anaesthetic on Serum Biomarkers and on PBMCs in Breast Cancer Surgery Not yet recruiting Tata Memorial Centre N/A Surgery, perioperative stress, anaesthetics and analgesics may modulate the immunosurveillance mechanisms and overwhelm host defences that normally maintain a balance between immunity & carcinogenesis. This may lead to escape of cancer cells and tilt the scales toward a more protumorigenic microenvironment. Volatile agents, in particular, have been shown to exhibit profound immunosuppressive effects. In comparison, propofol has a favorable profile and inhibits cancer cell activity. Determining "cancer-protective" role of TIVA with propofol presents an exciting window of opportunity that has potential to improve outcomes in cancer patients undergoing resection surgery
NCT03052673 Ketamine for Pain Relief in Bariatric Surgery Recruiting Sir Ganga Ram Hospital Phase 4 The surgical interventions for treating morbid obesity, i.e. bypass procedure and sleeve gastrectomy are collectively covered under the term `bariatric surgery`. The growth of bariatric surgery has seen consonant development of anaesthesia techniques so as to ensure patient safety and facilitate post-surgery outcome. Conventionally, balanced general anaesthesia techniques routinely use opioids peri-operatively for intra-operative haemodynamic homeostasis and postoperative pain relief. However, since the morbidly obese patients have high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea(OSA) and other co-morbidities the same technique when employed in the morbidly obese patients hampers early and intermediate postoperative recovery due to the occurrence of side effects, such as, sedation, PONV, respiratory depression, depressed GI-mobility. The above stated side effects, have lead to increased propensity for postoperative cardiac and pulmonary complications. Obese patients are more vulnerable and sensitive to the narcotics and sedatives, these drugs need to be employed judiciously in these patients. On the other hand, the reduction in opioid use may result in acute post-operative pain that may limit post-surgery rehabilitation. Therefore, we need to minimise opioid use and employ some other drugs which besides having analgesia, has a opioid-sparing effect also. Ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has analgesic properties in sub-anaesthetic doses. When used in low dose (0.2mg/kg), it is an analgesic, anti-hyperalgesic, and prevents development of opioid tolerance. On a conceptual basis, a key advantage of ketamine is that it can reduces post-operative pain and use of opioid when used per-operatively. Therefore, a regimen which avoid or minimise use of opioid is likely to decrease opioid-related postoperative morbidity in these patients undergoing bariatric surgery.In view of the above, a clinical research is highly desirable to study techniques to decrease the use of opioids in obese surgical patients.This prospective randomised two-arm study aims to assess the effect of low-dose ketamine on postoperative pain relief and opioid-sparing ability in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery.
NCT03099616 Automated Closed Loop Propofol Anaesthesia Versus Desflurane Inhalation Anaesthesia In Bariatric Surgery Not yet recruiting Dr Nitin Sethi Phase 4 Complete recovery from anaesthesia is absolutely desirable in the obese patients to avoid postoperative airway, oxygen ventilation or sleep apnea related complications. Over the years, Desflurane has emerged as the anaesthetic agent of choice for maintenance of anaesthesia in obese patients for its efficient elimination profile and ability to facilitate early recovery from anaesthesia. Alternatively, Propofol is a commonly used intravenous anesthetic agent administered as a part of total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) regimen. However, it is a lipid soluble drug and there are concerns that it may accumulate in obese patients due to their increased proportion of body fat Therefore, Propofol TIVA is likely to result in a prolonged duration of action and consequently, delayed emergence from anaesthesia and a protracted recovery time. A recent advance in the delivery of Propofol to the patient is the development of computer-controlled anesthesia delivery systems. These devices deliver Propofol based on feedback from patient's frontal cortex electrical activity as determined by monitoring bispectral index (BIS). Evaluation of anesthesia delivery by these systems has shown that Propofol and maintain depth of anesthesia with far more precision as compared to manual/simple infusion administration. This, in turn, holds promise that recovery from Propofol anaesthesia can also be favourable in the obese patients. An indigenously developed computer-controlled anesthesia delivery sytem is the closed loop anaesthesia delivery system (CLADS), which has been extensively evaluated in patients belonging to different surgical settings. The evidence generated with Propofol anaesthesia delivered by CLADS has shown significant improvement in recovery outcome.The performance of CLADS has not yet been evaluated in obese surgical patients. We hypothesise that in the obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery, automated delivery of Propofol using CLADS would allow precision control of anaesthesia depth, intra-operative haemodynamics, and rapid recovery from anaesthesia. We plan to conduct a randomised controlled investigation to compare patient recovery profile following Desflurane anaesthesia versus CLADS empowered Propofol anaesthesia.
NCT03243500 Efficacy and Safety of Adding Atracurium to Percaruncular Block for High Myopes Undergoing Cataract Surgery Completed Kasr El Aini Hospital Phase 4 There are several local anesthetic techniques available for cataract surgery and the choice depends on patient, surgical and operator factors. The eyes of patients with axial myopia (the eye globe is abnormally elongated) have thin wall (sclera), limited space for needle insertion for local anesthetic injection between the globe and the orbit and out-pouching of the back of the eye (staphyloma). These factors increased the risk of perforation following conventional needle techniques of eye block The current study technique is per-caruncular injection (the needle insertion site is between the nasal side of the globe and bony orbit) which may provide a safer alternative to the conventional needle techniques for myopic patients. The space of injection is devoid of blood vessels moreover, myopic staphylomata are infrequently located on the nasal side of the globe. Local injection of muscle relaxant added to local anesthetic solution may provide earlier onset of eye muscle paralysis thus earlier onset of favorable surgical condition than local anesthetic solution alone. The current study will demonstrate the effect of adding low dose atracurium (a muscle relaxant) to local anesthetic mixture in providing early onset of eye muscle paralysis and favorable surgical condition in per-caruncular technique of eye block in high myopes undergoing cataract surgery.
NCT03307551 Evaluation of Automated Propofol Delivery in Patients Undergoing Thoracic Surgery Not yet recruiting Dr Nitin Sethi Phase 4 Automated delivery of propofol using computer-controlled closed loop anesthesia device delivers propofol based on patient's frontal cortex electrical activity as determined by bispectral index (BIS). Evaluation of anesthesia delivery by these systems has shown that they deliver propofol and maintain depth of anesthesia with far more precision as compared to manual administration. By automatically controlling anaesthesia depth consistency they provide time to the anaesthesiologist to focus on other aspects of patient care such as managing intra-operative hemodynamics and ventilation perturbations during major surgeries. Closed loop anaesthesia delivery system (CLADS) is an indigenously developed continuous automated intravenous infusion system which delivers propofol based on patients EEG profile (BIS) feedback. Although a few studies have already evaluated these automated systems in patients undergoing thoracic surgery, but suffered from significant limitations (small number of patients, not dedicated to thoracic surgery cohort). Currently, there is no data available regarding CLADS performance vis a vis adequacy of GA and haemodynamic profile in patients undergoing thoracic surgery. We contend that propofol as delivered by CLADS will proffer greater consistency to anaesthesia depth, intra-operative hemodynamic stability, and rapid recovery upon anaesthesia discontinuation than manual means of delivering propofol TIVA. This randomised controlled study aims to compare the efficiency of CLADS-driven propofol TIVA versus manually controlled propofol TIVA in patients undergoing thoracic surgery.
NCT03337373 The Study of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Cisatracurium Not yet recruiting Mahidol University Phase 4 Pathophysiological changes influenced by multiple factors in critically ill patients, has a significant impact on pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of cisatracurium. In order to understand better and find an appropriate dosing regimen, the purpose of this study is to investigate the PK and PD of a loading dose cisatracurium in critically ill patients. Cisatracurium, nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs), are commonly used in intensive care units because of a lesser effect on hemodynamic parameters and a reduction in mortality rate in ARDS patients. Loading dose recommended in clinical practice guidelines for sustained neuromuscular blockade in the adult critically ill patient is 0.1-0.2 mg/kg. Then, maintenance dose of 1-3 mcg/kg/min is followed regarding indications, such as ARDS. However, this recommended loading dose might not be adequate in critically ill patients, the study in this specific population might be needed.
Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary

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Clinical Trial Conditions for Atracurium Besylate

Condition Name

Condition Name for Atracurium Besylate
Intervention Trials
Surgery 1
Anesthesia; Bariatric Surgery 1
Pain, Postoperative 1
Respiratory Failure 1
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Atracurium Besylate
Intervention Trials
Pain, Postoperative 2
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn 1
Breast Neoplasms 1
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult 1
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Clinical Trial Locations for Atracurium Besylate

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Atracurium Besylate
Location Trials
India 4
Egypt 3
Thailand 1
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Clinical Trial Progress for Atracurium Besylate

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Atracurium Besylate
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 5
Phase 2 1
N/A 2
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Atracurium Besylate
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Not yet recruiting 5
Recruiting 2
Completed 1
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Atracurium Besylate

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Atracurium Besylate
Sponsor Trials
Dr Nitin Sethi 2
Tata Memorial Centre 1
South Egypt Cancer Institute 1
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Atracurium Besylate
Sponsor Trials
Other 8
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Serving hundreds of leading biopharmaceutical companies globally:

Julphar
Boehringer Ingelheim
Cerilliant
McKesson
Cipla
Farmers Insurance
AstraZeneca
Deloitte
Mallinckrodt

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