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Generated: December 16, 2018

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR ANTABUSE

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Clinical Trials for Antabuse

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary
NCT00167232 Naltrexone in Two Models of Psychosocial Treatments for Cocaine and Alcohol Dependence Completed National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Phase 3 The purpose of this study is to see whether naltrexone is safe and useful in preventing alcohol relapse, as well as in decreasing craving for alcohol in people with a diagnosis of alcohol and cocaine dependence. Naltrexone is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of alcohol dependence. However, the medication was not approved as yet at the dosage we will use in this study. The dosage we will use for the study (150 mg), is greater than the recommended dosage from the Physician's Desk Reference (50mg). Unlike other medicines (like Antabuse) useful in the treatment of alcohol dependence, naltrexone will not make you sick if you drink alcohol. Rather, people who are taking this medication have reported that it helps decrease the pleasure associated with drinking for them. This study is being conducted because the medication (Naltrexone) has not been well studied in people with both alcohol and cocaine dependence, so it is still investigational. We believe that if we can reduce alcohol consumption through naltrexone and psychotherapy, this may lead to reduced cocaine use. We are also conducting this study to test two different types of psychotherapy as a method for reducing cocaine and alcohol use. One type of psychotherapy is designed to help people learn to cope with situations that put them at high risk for relapse to cocaine and/or alcohol use. The other type of psychotherapy we will use focuses on strengthening motivation to recover from cocaine and/or alcohol use, and on developing techniques to handle possible barriers to recovery. We seek to enroll 300 patients in the study.
NCT00167232 Naltrexone in Two Models of Psychosocial Treatments for Cocaine and Alcohol Dependence Completed University of Pennsylvania Phase 3 The purpose of this study is to see whether naltrexone is safe and useful in preventing alcohol relapse, as well as in decreasing craving for alcohol in people with a diagnosis of alcohol and cocaine dependence. Naltrexone is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of alcohol dependence. However, the medication was not approved as yet at the dosage we will use in this study. The dosage we will use for the study (150 mg), is greater than the recommended dosage from the Physician's Desk Reference (50mg). Unlike other medicines (like Antabuse) useful in the treatment of alcohol dependence, naltrexone will not make you sick if you drink alcohol. Rather, people who are taking this medication have reported that it helps decrease the pleasure associated with drinking for them. This study is being conducted because the medication (Naltrexone) has not been well studied in people with both alcohol and cocaine dependence, so it is still investigational. We believe that if we can reduce alcohol consumption through naltrexone and psychotherapy, this may lead to reduced cocaine use. We are also conducting this study to test two different types of psychotherapy as a method for reducing cocaine and alcohol use. One type of psychotherapy is designed to help people learn to cope with situations that put them at high risk for relapse to cocaine and/or alcohol use. The other type of psychotherapy we will use focuses on strengthening motivation to recover from cocaine and/or alcohol use, and on developing techniques to handle possible barriers to recovery. We seek to enroll 300 patients in the study.
NCT00218660 Naltrexone in Two Models of Psychosocial Treatments for Cocaine and Alcohol Dependence - 1 Completed National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Phase 3 The purpose of this study is to see whether naltrexone is safe and useful in preventing alcohol relapse, as well as in decreasing craving for alcohol in people with a diagnosis of alcohol and cocaine dependence. Naltrexone is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of alcohol dependence. However, the medication was not approved as yet at the dosage we will use in this study. The dosage we will use for the study (150 mg), is greater than the recommended dosage from the Physician's Desk Reference (50mg). Unlike other medicines (like Antabuse) useful in the treatment of alcohol dependence, naltrexone will not make you sick if you drink alcohol. Rather, people who are taking this medication have reported that it helps decrease the pleasure associated with drinking for them. This study is being conducted because the medication (Naltrexone) has not been well studied in people with both alcohol and cocaine dependence, so it is still investigational. We believe that if we can reduce alcohol consumption through naltrexone and psychotherapy, this may lead to reduced cocaine use. We are also conducting this study to test two different types of psychotherapy as a method for reducing cocaine and alcohol use. One type of psychotherapy, CBT, is designed to help people learn to cope with situations that put them at high risk for relapse to cocaine and/or alcohol use. The other type of psychotherapy, BRENDA, will use focuses on strengthening motivation to recover from cocaine and/or alcohol use, and on developing techniques to handle possible barriers to recovery. We seek to enroll 300 patients in the study.
NCT00218660 Naltrexone in Two Models of Psychosocial Treatments for Cocaine and Alcohol Dependence - 1 Completed University of Pennsylvania Phase 3 The purpose of this study is to see whether naltrexone is safe and useful in preventing alcohol relapse, as well as in decreasing craving for alcohol in people with a diagnosis of alcohol and cocaine dependence. Naltrexone is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of alcohol dependence. However, the medication was not approved as yet at the dosage we will use in this study. The dosage we will use for the study (150 mg), is greater than the recommended dosage from the Physician's Desk Reference (50mg). Unlike other medicines (like Antabuse) useful in the treatment of alcohol dependence, naltrexone will not make you sick if you drink alcohol. Rather, people who are taking this medication have reported that it helps decrease the pleasure associated with drinking for them. This study is being conducted because the medication (Naltrexone) has not been well studied in people with both alcohol and cocaine dependence, so it is still investigational. We believe that if we can reduce alcohol consumption through naltrexone and psychotherapy, this may lead to reduced cocaine use. We are also conducting this study to test two different types of psychotherapy as a method for reducing cocaine and alcohol use. One type of psychotherapy, CBT, is designed to help people learn to cope with situations that put them at high risk for relapse to cocaine and/or alcohol use. The other type of psychotherapy, BRENDA, will use focuses on strengthening motivation to recover from cocaine and/or alcohol use, and on developing techniques to handle possible barriers to recovery. We seek to enroll 300 patients in the study.
NCT00246415 A Placebo-Controlled Trial of Memantine for Alcohol Dependence Completed National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Phase 2 The purpose of this study is to obtain a preliminary indication of the safety and effectiveness of oral memantine (40 mg/day) in alcohol dependent patients. This study is a 16-week study comparison of memantine and placebo in patients with alcohol dependence.
NCT00312819 Initial Assessment of the Effect of the Addition of Disulfiram (Antabuse) to Standard Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer Completed Augusta Hospital, Berlin Phase 2/Phase 3 Recent studies in laboratory animals demonstrate the ability of disulfiram to significantly inhibit the growth and metastasis of a mouse model of lung cancer. Work with cells in vitro support the idea that this inhibition is mainly due to the inhibition of angiogenesis - the formation of new blood vessels in the tumor. Furthermore, it was found out that the best effect has been obtained when disulfiram has been used not at the highest dose but at an optimal dose, which is smaller. Thus, this trial will assess the addition of disulfiram to chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLCA).
NCT00312819 Initial Assessment of the Effect of the Addition of Disulfiram (Antabuse) to Standard Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer Completed Hadassah Medical Organization Phase 2/Phase 3 Recent studies in laboratory animals demonstrate the ability of disulfiram to significantly inhibit the growth and metastasis of a mouse model of lung cancer. Work with cells in vitro support the idea that this inhibition is mainly due to the inhibition of angiogenesis - the formation of new blood vessels in the tumor. Furthermore, it was found out that the best effect has been obtained when disulfiram has been used not at the highest dose but at an optimal dose, which is smaller. Thus, this trial will assess the addition of disulfiram to chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLCA).
Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary

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Clinical Trial Conditions for Antabuse

Condition Name

Condition Name for Antabuse
Intervention Trials
Alcoholism 3
Cocaine Dependence 2
Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 1
Alcohol Dependence 1
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Antabuse
Intervention Trials
Alcoholism 5
Cocaine-Related Disorders 3
Lung Neoplasms 1
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung 1
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Clinical Trial Locations for Antabuse

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Antabuse
Location Trials
United States 5
Israel 1
Denmark 1
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Antabuse
Location Trials
Pennsylvania 2
New Mexico 1
Connecticut 1
New York 1
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Clinical Trial Progress for Antabuse

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Antabuse
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 2
Phase 3 2
Phase 2/Phase 3 2
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Antabuse
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 5
Unknown status 2
Not yet recruiting 1
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Antabuse

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Antabuse
Sponsor Trials
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) 3
University of Pennsylvania 2
Augusta Hospital, Berlin 1
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Antabuse
Sponsor Trials
Other 12
NIH 4
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Serving hundreds of leading biopharmaceutical companies globally:

Express Scripts
Cipla
Covington
Deloitte
Queensland Health
Daiichi Sankyo
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Cantor Fitzgerald
Fish and Richardson

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