You’re using a public version of DrugPatentWatch with 5 free searches available | Register to unlock more free searches. CREATE FREE ACCOUNT

Last Updated: June 13, 2024

505(b)(2) Clinical Trials for Over the Counter (OTC) Drugs


✉ Email this page to a colleague

« Back to Dashboard


Drug(s) Trial Type Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
  • COLD CAPSULE IV
  • COLD CAPSULE V
  • COMPOUND 65
  • SOMA COMPOUND
  • OTC NCT00009542 ↗ Effects of Kava on the Body's Elimination of Caffeine and Dextromethorphan Completed National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC) Phase 4 2001-01-01 This study will examine how kava-a widely used herbal remedy-may affect the body's elimination of other medicines. Many people take kava to reduce anxiety or cause sedation. Since this product is considered a food supplement and not a drug, it is not subject to the rigorous pre-market testing required for prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. As a result, information has not been collected on possible interactions between kava and other medications. This study will look at how kava affects the elimination of caffeine-a compound commonly found in chocolate, coffee, tea and soft drinks-and dextromethorphan-an OTC cough suppressant. Normal healthy volunteers 21 years of age or older may be eligible for this 30-day study. Candidates will provide a medical history and undergo a physical examination and routine blood tests. Women of childbearing age will have a urine pregnancy test. Study participants will not drink alcoholic beverages or take any medications (except those given in the study) for 2 weeks prior to the study and throughout its duration. In addition, they will abstain from caffeine, grapefruit and grapefruit juice and charbroiled foods for at least 72 hours before and throughout each study day that urine is collected. On day 1 of the study, study subjects will take one dose each of caffeine and dextromethorphan at 4:00 P.M.. They will empty their bladder before the dosing and then collect all their urine after the dosing for the rest of the day and including the next mornings first urine. They will bring the urine samples to the Clinical Center when the collection is complete. This procedure will be repeated 1 week later (study day 8). After the second urine collection is completed, subjects will take 200 milligrams of kava 3 times a day for 21 days. On study day 29 (after 21 days of kava), subjects will repeat the dextromethorphan and caffeine dosing and urine collection described above, while continuing to take kava. Subjects will have an electroencephalograph (EEG) done before starting kava and again at the end of kava (study day 30). For this procedure, several electrodes (metal cups attached to wires) are secured to the scalp with a glue-like substance. A conductive gel fills the space between the electrode and the scalp to ensure good contact. The electrodes will remain in place for about 2 hours and then removed. The subject lies quietly on a bed during the EEG recording. Participation in the study will end with another physical examination and blood tests following the second EEG and urine collection.
  • ASPIRIN
  • IBUPROFEN
  • MEPRO-ASPIRIN
  • MOTRIN
  • MOTRIN IB
  • NUPRIN
  • PHENYTOIN
  • OTC NCT00011063 ↗ Effect of Ginkgo Biloba on Phenytoin Elimination Completed National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC) Phase 1 2001-02-01 This study will examine how the herbal remedy ginkgo biloba may affect the body's elimination of other medicines. Many people take ginkgo biloba to improve memory, mental alertness and overall feeling of well being. Since this product is considered a food supplement and not a drug, it is not subject to the rigorous pre-market testing required for prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. As a result, information has not been collected on possible interactions between ginkgo biloba and other medications. This study will look at how ginkgo biloba affects the elimination of phenytoin-a medication used to treat patients with seizures. Normal healthy volunteers 21 years of age or older may be eligible for this 40-day study. Candidates will provide a medical history and undergo a physical examination and routine blood tests. Women of childbearing age must use a reliable form of birth control other than oral contraceptives ("the pill"). For at least 2 weeks before the study and throughout its duration, study participants may not have any of the following: 1) medications that can affect platelet function (e.g., aspirin, Motrin, Advil, Nuprin, ibuprofen, etc.); 2) alcoholic beverages; 3) grapefruit and grapefruit juice; and 4) all medications except those given by study personnel. On day 1 of the study, subjects take one 500-mg dose of phenytoin at 8:00 A.M.. On an empty stomach. (Subjects fast the night before taking the phenytoin and are allowed to eat breakfast 2 hours after the dose). Blood samples are drawn just before dosing and again at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24, 32, 48, 72 and 96 hours after the dose. Blood drawn on this first study day is collected through a catheter (small plastic tube) placed in a vein to avoid multiple needlesticks. After the 12-hour sample is collected, the subject goes home and then returns to the clinic for the remaining blood draws, which are taken by direct needlestick. When the blood sampling is completed, subjects begin ginkgo therapy. The NIH Clinical Center provides participants a supply of 60-mg capsules of ginkgo to take twice a day (at 8 A.M. and 8 P.M..) for 4 weeks. At the end of the 4 weeks, subjects are given a second dose of phenytoin as described above and repeat the blood sampling procedure. Subjects continue taking ginkgo during this second phenytoin study.
    CRIXIVAN OTC NCT00011635 ↗ The Effect of Milk Thistle on the Pharmacokinetics of Indinavir Completed National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC) Phase 1 2001-02-01 Complementary and alternative medicines are widely used in the HIV-infected population. Recent data have shown serious drug interactions between certain complementary medicines and protease inhibitors. Silymarin (Milk thistle) is a commonly used dietary supplement in HIV-infected patients for treatment of hepatitis or as a hepato-protectant. Data are available suggesting that it may alter cytochrome P4503A4-mediated drug metabolism. To evaluate the effect of milk thistle on the protease inhibitor, indinavir (IDV), ten healthy subjects will receive IDV (Crixivan) alone and in combination with an over-the-counter silymarin preparation. IDV will initially be administered alone at a dose of 800 mg Q8H for four doses and serial samples will be collected for determination of IDV pharmacokinetics after the morning dose on day 2. Subjects will then initiate therapy will milk thistle using a standardized formulation and dose for three weeks after which subjects will then again take 4 doses of IDV and have serial samples collected for IDV plasma concentrations. There will then be a 11-day washout period with no drugs, after which IDV will again be given for 4 doses and samples will be collected evaluate the offset of the effects of milk thistle. To examine the effect of milk thistle on other CYP450 pathways, subjects will receive a single dose of caffeine and dextromethorphan and have urine collected before and after milk thistle, and after the washout period. Indinavir, caffeine, and dextromethorphan concentrations in plasma or urine will be determined using validated HPLC methods. Steady-state noncompartmental parameters of indinavir in the presence and absence of milk thistle will be determined. Pharmacokinetic parameters will be compared using ANOVA that will include factors for a period effect and a treatment effect. Statistical analyses will include calculation of the mean ratio of the AUC in the treatment phases compared to IDV alone and determination of 95% confidence intervals. This study will help define the drug interaction potential of complementary and alternative therapies in HIV-infected patients.
  • ANTITUSSIVE
  • LORAZEPAM
  • VALIUM
  • OTC NCT00055549 ↗ Dextromethorphan to Treat Patients With Voice Spasms Completed National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Phase 1 2003-03-04 This study will examine how dextromethorphan, a drug that alters reflexes of the larynx (voice box), might change voice symptoms in people with voice disorders due to uncontrolled laryngeal muscle spasms. These include abductor spasmodic dysphonia (breathy voice breaks), adductor spasmodic dysphonia (vowel breaks), muscular tension dysphonia (tight strained voice), and vocal tremor (tremulous voice). Dextromethorphan-one of a group of drugs called NMDA antagonists-has been used for years in over-the-counter cough suppressant medicines. In animal studies, the drug has blocked one of the reflexes in the larynx that may be associated with spasms in the laryngeal muscles. This study will compare the effects of dextromethorphan, lorazepam (a valium-type drug), and a placebo (inactive substance) in patients with the four types of voice disorders described above. Patients with spasmodic dysphonia, muscular tension dysphonia and vocal tremor may be eligible for this study. Individuals who smoke or use tobacco, who have vocal nodules or polyps, or who have a history of airway obstruction may not participate. Candidates will be screened with a medical history and physical examination, a questionnaire, voice recording (repeating sentences into a microphone), and nasolaryngoscopy (examination of the larynx with a tube advanced through the nose). For the nasolaryngoscopy, the inside of the nose is sprayed with a decongestant (to open the nasal passages) and possibly a local anesthetic. A small, flexible tube called a nasolaryngoscope is passed through the nose to look at the larynx during speech and other tasks, such as singing, whistling and prolonged vowels. Participants will be admitted to the NIH Clinical Center for each of three visits, which will last from the afternoon of one day to late afternoon of the following day. At each visit, patients will complete a questionnaire, baseline speech recording, and a test for sedation level. They will take three pills-either dextromethorphan, lorazepam, or placebo-one every 6 hours. Vital signs will be checked every 6 hours and the level of sedation during waking hours will be monitored. One to three hours after taking the third pill, speech recording, questionnaire and test of sedation will be repeated to check for possible voice changes. Patients will be given a different pill at each visit. ...
    >Drug(s) >Trial Type >Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

    Make Better Decisions: Try a trial or see plans & pricing

    Drugs may be covered by multiple patents or regulatory protections. All trademarks and applicant names are the property of their respective owners or licensors. Although great care is taken in the proper and correct provision of this service, thinkBiotech LLC does not accept any responsibility for possible consequences of errors or omissions in the provided data. The data presented herein is for information purposes only. There is no warranty that the data contained herein is error free. thinkBiotech performs no independent verification of facts as provided by public sources nor are attempts made to provide legal or investing advice. Any reliance on data provided herein is done solely at the discretion of the user. Users of this service are advised to seek professional advice and independent confirmation before considering acting on any of the provided information. thinkBiotech LLC reserves the right to amend, extend or withdraw any part or all of the offered service without notice.