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Last Updated: December 3, 2021

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR ZOSTAVAX

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All Clinical Trials for ZOSTAVAX

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT01474720 ↗ Zostavax in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Completed Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation Phase 1 2011-11-01 Individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, lupus) appear to be at increased risk for the development of shingles, a painful reactivation of the varicella zoster virus that causes chicken pox. The investigators propose to study the immune response to commercially available Zostavax vaccine (shingles vaccine) in adult patients with SLE who have minimal disease activity and are on mild immunosuppressant medications, and to compare the immune response to that seen in healthy people following vaccination. Acceptable immunosuppressive drugs permitted in the study are those felt to be safe according to Centers for Disease Control guidelines. Ten healthy people and 10 SLE patients (all over 50 years of age) will be recruited to receive a single, standard dose of Zostavax. Blood samples and physical examination will be performed prior to injection, then 2,6,and 12 weeks following vaccination. All participants will receive active vaccine, there is no placebo group.
NCT01506661 ↗ Safety of Zostavax Vaccination in Rheumatoid Arthritis Completed Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation Phase 1 2012-01-01 Herpes Zoster (shingles) is caused by reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) that usually occurs decades following initial exposure. The risk of developing shingles increases with age. Shingles presents as a painful, itchy blistering rash that usually involves a single portion of the skin and lasts about 7-10 days. The risk of developing shingles increases with age in healthy people, and has been shown in some studies to be increased in people with rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. Zostavax, a live-attenuated vaccine against the varicella zoster virus, was first approved by the FDA for the prevention of Shingles among people 60 years and older, and is now approved for use in people aged 50 years and older. Because rheumatoid arthritis and some of the medications used to treat rheumatoid arthritis can impair the body's immune system, it is not known how much of an immune response can be generated in people with rheumatoid arthritis. The goals of this study are to measure the immune response after standard vaccination with Zostavax in people with rheumatoid arthritis in comparison to people with healthy immune systems. All participants will be 50 years old or older, and subjects with rheumatoid arthritis will not be eligible if they are taking certain biologic medications, including TNF inhibitors (Etanercept or Adalimumab). Ten healthy subjects and 10 subjects with rheumatoid arthritis will all receive a single vaccination with Zostavax, then will be followed for 12 weeks to assess the immune response and for the development of local rash or other potential side effects.
NCT01953900 ↗ iC9-GD2-CAR-VZV-CTLs/Refractory or Metastatic GD2-positive Sarcoma and Neuroblastoma Active, not recruiting Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Baylor College of Medicine Phase 1 2014-04-01 The purpose of this study is to find the largest safe dose of GD2-T cells (also called iC9-GD2-CAR-VZV-CTLs) in combination with a varicella zoster vaccine and lymohodepleting chemotherapy. Additionally, we will learn what the side effects of this treatment are and to see whether this therapy might help patients with advanced osteosarcoma and neuroblastoma. Because there is no standard treatment for recurrent/refractory osteosarcoma and neuroblastoma at this time or because the currently used treatments do not work fully in all cases, patients are being asked to volunteer to take part in a gene transfer research study using special immune cells. The body has different ways of fighting infection and disease. No single way seems perfect for fighting cancers. This research study combines two different ways of fighting cancer: antibodies and T cells. Antibodies are types of proteins that protect the body from infectious diseases and possibly cancer. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including cells infected with viruses and tumor cells. Both antibodies and T cells have been used to treat patients with cancers. They have shown promise, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. Investigators have found from previous research that a new gene can be put into T cells that will make them recognize cancer cells and kill them. Investigators now want to see if a new gene can be put in these cells that will let the T cells recognize and kill sarcoma and neuroblastoma cells. The new gene is called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and consists of an antibody called 14g2a that recognizes GD2, a protein that is found on sarcoma and neuroblastoma cells (GD2-CAR). In addition, it contains parts of the CD28 and OX40 genes which can stimulate T cells to make them live longer. Investigators have found that CAR-T cells can kill some of the tumor, but they don't last very long in the body and so the tumor eventually comes back. T cells that recognize the virus that causes chicken pox, varicella zoster virus (VZV), remain in the bloodstream for many years especially if they are stimulated or boosted by the VZV vaccine. Investigators will therefore insert the GD2-CAR gene into T cells that recognize VZV. These cells are called iC9-GD2-CAR-VZV-specific T cells but are referred to as GD2-T cells for simplicity.
NCT01953900 ↗ iC9-GD2-CAR-VZV-CTLs/Refractory or Metastatic GD2-positive Sarcoma and Neuroblastoma Active, not recruiting National Cancer Institute (NCI) Phase 1 2014-04-01 The purpose of this study is to find the largest safe dose of GD2-T cells (also called iC9-GD2-CAR-VZV-CTLs) in combination with a varicella zoster vaccine and lymohodepleting chemotherapy. Additionally, we will learn what the side effects of this treatment are and to see whether this therapy might help patients with advanced osteosarcoma and neuroblastoma. Because there is no standard treatment for recurrent/refractory osteosarcoma and neuroblastoma at this time or because the currently used treatments do not work fully in all cases, patients are being asked to volunteer to take part in a gene transfer research study using special immune cells. The body has different ways of fighting infection and disease. No single way seems perfect for fighting cancers. This research study combines two different ways of fighting cancer: antibodies and T cells. Antibodies are types of proteins that protect the body from infectious diseases and possibly cancer. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including cells infected with viruses and tumor cells. Both antibodies and T cells have been used to treat patients with cancers. They have shown promise, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. Investigators have found from previous research that a new gene can be put into T cells that will make them recognize cancer cells and kill them. Investigators now want to see if a new gene can be put in these cells that will let the T cells recognize and kill sarcoma and neuroblastoma cells. The new gene is called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and consists of an antibody called 14g2a that recognizes GD2, a protein that is found on sarcoma and neuroblastoma cells (GD2-CAR). In addition, it contains parts of the CD28 and OX40 genes which can stimulate T cells to make them live longer. Investigators have found that CAR-T cells can kill some of the tumor, but they don't last very long in the body and so the tumor eventually comes back. T cells that recognize the virus that causes chicken pox, varicella zoster virus (VZV), remain in the bloodstream for many years especially if they are stimulated or boosted by the VZV vaccine. Investigators will therefore insert the GD2-CAR gene into T cells that recognize VZV. These cells are called iC9-GD2-CAR-VZV-specific T cells but are referred to as GD2-T cells for simplicity.
NCT01953900 ↗ iC9-GD2-CAR-VZV-CTLs/Refractory or Metastatic GD2-positive Sarcoma and Neuroblastoma Active, not recruiting The Methodist Hospital Research Institute Phase 1 2014-04-01 The purpose of this study is to find the largest safe dose of GD2-T cells (also called iC9-GD2-CAR-VZV-CTLs) in combination with a varicella zoster vaccine and lymohodepleting chemotherapy. Additionally, we will learn what the side effects of this treatment are and to see whether this therapy might help patients with advanced osteosarcoma and neuroblastoma. Because there is no standard treatment for recurrent/refractory osteosarcoma and neuroblastoma at this time or because the currently used treatments do not work fully in all cases, patients are being asked to volunteer to take part in a gene transfer research study using special immune cells. The body has different ways of fighting infection and disease. No single way seems perfect for fighting cancers. This research study combines two different ways of fighting cancer: antibodies and T cells. Antibodies are types of proteins that protect the body from infectious diseases and possibly cancer. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including cells infected with viruses and tumor cells. Both antibodies and T cells have been used to treat patients with cancers. They have shown promise, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. Investigators have found from previous research that a new gene can be put into T cells that will make them recognize cancer cells and kill them. Investigators now want to see if a new gene can be put in these cells that will let the T cells recognize and kill sarcoma and neuroblastoma cells. The new gene is called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and consists of an antibody called 14g2a that recognizes GD2, a protein that is found on sarcoma and neuroblastoma cells (GD2-CAR). In addition, it contains parts of the CD28 and OX40 genes which can stimulate T cells to make them live longer. Investigators have found that CAR-T cells can kill some of the tumor, but they don't last very long in the body and so the tumor eventually comes back. T cells that recognize the virus that causes chicken pox, varicella zoster virus (VZV), remain in the bloodstream for many years especially if they are stimulated or boosted by the VZV vaccine. Investigators will therefore insert the GD2-CAR gene into T cells that recognize VZV. These cells are called iC9-GD2-CAR-VZV-specific T cells but are referred to as GD2-T cells for simplicity.
NCT01953900 ↗ iC9-GD2-CAR-VZV-CTLs/Refractory or Metastatic GD2-positive Sarcoma and Neuroblastoma Active, not recruiting Baylor College of Medicine Phase 1 2014-04-01 The purpose of this study is to find the largest safe dose of GD2-T cells (also called iC9-GD2-CAR-VZV-CTLs) in combination with a varicella zoster vaccine and lymohodepleting chemotherapy. Additionally, we will learn what the side effects of this treatment are and to see whether this therapy might help patients with advanced osteosarcoma and neuroblastoma. Because there is no standard treatment for recurrent/refractory osteosarcoma and neuroblastoma at this time or because the currently used treatments do not work fully in all cases, patients are being asked to volunteer to take part in a gene transfer research study using special immune cells. The body has different ways of fighting infection and disease. No single way seems perfect for fighting cancers. This research study combines two different ways of fighting cancer: antibodies and T cells. Antibodies are types of proteins that protect the body from infectious diseases and possibly cancer. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including cells infected with viruses and tumor cells. Both antibodies and T cells have been used to treat patients with cancers. They have shown promise, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. Investigators have found from previous research that a new gene can be put into T cells that will make them recognize cancer cells and kill them. Investigators now want to see if a new gene can be put in these cells that will let the T cells recognize and kill sarcoma and neuroblastoma cells. The new gene is called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and consists of an antibody called 14g2a that recognizes GD2, a protein that is found on sarcoma and neuroblastoma cells (GD2-CAR). In addition, it contains parts of the CD28 and OX40 genes which can stimulate T cells to make them live longer. Investigators have found that CAR-T cells can kill some of the tumor, but they don't last very long in the body and so the tumor eventually comes back. T cells that recognize the virus that causes chicken pox, varicella zoster virus (VZV), remain in the bloodstream for many years especially if they are stimulated or boosted by the VZV vaccine. Investigators will therefore insert the GD2-CAR gene into T cells that recognize VZV. These cells are called iC9-GD2-CAR-VZV-specific T cells but are referred to as GD2-T cells for simplicity.
NCT02444936 ↗ ZOSTAVAX in Persons Imminently Receiving Chemotherapy for Solid Organ Tumors Unknown status Duke University Phase 4 2015-05-01 This study evaluates if the shingles vaccine works in those persons that receive it before they receive chemotherapy for solid organ tumors. Half of the participants will receive the ZOSTAVAX shingle vaccine and half of the participants will not received anything.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for ZOSTAVAX

Condition Name

Condition Name for ZOSTAVAX
Intervention Trials
Rheumatoid Arthritis 3
Psoriasis 2
Psoriatic Arthritis 2
Ankylosing Spondylitis 2
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for ZOSTAVAX
Intervention Trials
Arthritis, Rheumatoid 3
Arthritis 3
Herpes Zoster 3
Arthritis, Psoriatic 2
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Clinical Trial Locations for ZOSTAVAX

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for ZOSTAVAX
Location Trials
United States 45
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for ZOSTAVAX
Location Trials
New York 3
Texas 3
South Carolina 2
Tennessee 2
West Virginia 2
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Clinical Trial Progress for ZOSTAVAX

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for ZOSTAVAX
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 2
Phase 2 2
Phase 1 3
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for ZOSTAVAX
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 3
Active, not recruiting 3
Terminated 1
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for ZOSTAVAX

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for ZOSTAVAX
Sponsor Trials
Oregon Health and Science University 2
University of Alabama at Birmingham 2
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation 2
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for ZOSTAVAX
Sponsor Trials
Other 12
NIH 2
Industry 1
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