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Generated: December 19, 2018

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR SODIUM NITRITE

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Clinical Trials for Sodium Nitrite

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary
NCT00048477 Effects of Nitrite on Blood Vessel Dilation in Normal Volunteers Completed National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Phase 2 Nitric oxide gas is important in regulating blood vessel dilation, and consequently, blood flow. This gas is continuously produced by endothelial cells, which line the blood vessels. This study will examine whether nitrite, a molecule that normally circulates in the blood stream, can also dilate blood vessels. The results of this study may be valuable in developing treatments for people with conditions associated with impaired endothelial production of nitric oxide, including high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, diabetes, estrogen deficiency, and others. Healthy, non-smoking normal volunteers 21 years of age or older may be eligible for this study. People who lack the enzyme G6PD or cytochrome B5 in their red blood cells may not participate. Absence of these enzymes can lead to episodes of sudden shortness of breath and cyanosis (blueness of the skin due to lack of sufficient oxygen). Participants will undergo the procedures described in study Parts A and B, as follows: - Part A - After numbing the skin, small tubes are placed in the artery and vein at the inside of the elbow of the dominant arm (right- or left-handed) and a small tube is placed in a vein of the other arm. The tubes are used for infusing saline (salt water) and for drawing blood samples. A pressure cuff is placed around the upper part of the dominant arm, and a rubber band device called a strain gauge is also placed around the arm to measure blood flow. When the cuff is inflated, blood flows into the arm, stretching the strain gauge at a rate proportional to the flow. Grip-strength of the dominant arm is measured with a dynamometer to determine maximum grip-strength. Then, several measurements of blood flow, nitrite, hemoglobin, and handgrip are made before and after administration of L-NMMA, a drug that blocks endothelial production of nitric oxide. - Part B - Part A testing is repeated, except that sodium nitrite dissolved in a saline solution is infused into the artery of the forearm for a few minutes before and during the hand-grip exercises. In addition, blood samples are drawn before and after each handgrip exercise to measure methemoglobin, a substance that, at excessive levels, can cause adverse side effects.
NCT00095472 Therapeutic Application of Intravascular Nitrite for Sickle Cell Disease Completed National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Phase 1 This study examines ways in which nitric oxide (NO), an important molecule that controls how blood flows through the body's vessels, might be restored with a compound called sodium nitrite. It is hoped that the result will reverse the effect of decreased flow of blood due to sickled cells-that is, cells that have changed into the shape of a crescent or sickle. Sickle cell disease is the most common genetic disease affecting African Americans. About 8% of that population has the sickle cell trait. The changed cells can become attached to blood vessels, decreasing blood flow to vital organs. There can be the loss of needed proteins, including hemoglobin, that deliver oxygen throughout the body. Adults at least 18 years of age who have the SS form of sickle cell disease or S-beta-thalassemia, are in either a steady state or crisis, give informed and written consent for participation, and have had a negative pregnancy test may be eligible for this study. Adults with any other disease that puts them at risk for reduced circulation are not eligible. Women who are breastfeeding are not eligible. Participants will undergo a medical history, including family medical history, and a detailed physical evaluation, to take about 1 hour. There will be a collection of blood; echocardiogram, which involves taking a picture of the heart and its four chambers; and measurement of exhaled carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and NO. A procedure called orthogonal polarization spectral imaging will be performed. A small object the size of a Popsicle stick will be placed under the tongue or on a fingertip. This procedure presents a picture of blood flow and how the red blood cells appear as they circulate through blood vessels. The study will be conducted in the Vascular Laboratory/Cardiovascular Floor or Intensive Care and will last about 4 hours. During the study, patients will lie in an adjustable reclining bed and chair. Small tubes will be placed in the artery and vein of the forearm at the inside of the elbow. A small pressure cuff will be applied to the wrist and a larger one to the upper arm. Both cuffs will be inflated with air. A strain gauge, resembling a rubber band, will go around the widest part of the forearm. When the pressure cuffs fill with air, blood will flow into the arm, and information from the strain gauge will be recorded. Between administrations of each medicine, there will be 30-minute rests. Normal saline will be put into the small tube in the artery. Measurements of the blood flow in the forearm will be taken, and a small blood sample will be taken to measure blood counts, proteins, and other natural body chemicals. Then a medicine called sodium nitroprusside, which causes blood vessels to expand and increase blood flow, will be placed into the forearm. It will be given at three different doses for 3 minutes each, with measurements recorded after each dose. Then a medicine called L-NMMA will be placed into the forearm. L-NMMA generally decreases local blood flow by preventing nitric oxide from being produced in the cells lining the blood vessels. It will be given at two different doses for 5 minutes each, with blood flow measured after each dose. Next, nitrite will be placed in the forearm at three different doses for 5 minutes each. Before and after nitrite is given, the researchers will measure the amount of the NO, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide that the patients breathe out. Then the procedure for administering normal saline, sodium nitroprusside, and L-NMMA will be repeated, as will a blood test. This study will not have a direct benefit for participants. However, it is hoped that the information gained from the study will help to develop treatment options for patients with sickle cell disease.
NCT00098072 Endothelial Cell Dysfunction in Pulmonary Hypertension Completed National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC) Phase 1 This study will examine and test healthy volunteers and patients with pulmonary hypertension to try to learn more about the disease and find better ways to detect, treat, and, if possible, slow progression. Pulmonary hypertension is a rare blood vessel disorder of the lung in which the pressure in the pulmonary artery (the blood vessel that leads from the heart to the lungs) rises above normal levels and may become life-threatening. Normal volunteers and patients with pulmonary hypertension 18 years of age and older may be eligible for this study. All candidates are screened with a review of their medical records. Normal volunteers also have a medical history, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram (heart ultrasound), and pulmonary function test, in which the subject breathes in and out of a tube that measures lung volume, mechanics and function. All participants undergo the following tests and procedures: - Echocardiogram to measure heart function and blood pressure in the lungs. A small probe held against the chest uses sound waves to obtain pictures of the heart. - Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the heart's pumping action. Subjects lie on a stretcher that slides into a long, tube-shaped scanner. The machine uses a magnetic field and radio waves to obtain images of the heart. - 6-minute walk to measure how far the subject can walk in 6 minutes. Subjects walk around the hospital for 6 minutes at a comfortable pace. - Exercise testing to measure the ability to exercise and the subject's oxygen levels during exercise. Subjects exercise on a bike or treadmill while the oxygen and carbon dioxide they breathe are measured using a small device placed in the mouth. - Right heart catheterization to measure pressure in the heart and lungs. A small catheter (plastic tube) is placed in an arm vein. A longer catheter called a central line is placed in a deeper vein in the neck or just below the neck, or in the leg or arm. A long, thin catheter that measures blood pressure directly is then inserted into the vein and advanced through the chambers of the heart into the lung artery to measure all the pressures in the heart and obtain blood samples. - Genetic and protein studies. DNA, RNA, and proteins from blood samples are studied for genes and proteins that might predict the development or progression of pulmonary hypertension. In addition to the above, patients whose pulmonary hypertension was caused by a blood vessel injury undergo the tests described below. The right heart catheter inserted for the catheterization procedure remains in place to obtain measurements of the effects of nitric oxide and nitrite in the following procedures: - Inhalation of nitric oxide (a gas naturally produced by cells lining arteries) at 30-minute intervals to examine its effect on lung and heart pressures. - Inhalation of aerosolized nitrite at 5-minute intervals to measure its effects on lung and heart pressures. - Inhalation of nitric oxide for up to 24 hours to obtain multiple measurements of its effect on lung and heart pressures. - Blood draws for laboratory tests. In patients whose pulmonary hypertension was caused by a blood vessel injury, we also plan to follow response to standard therapy. After the initiation of standard therapy, we will restudy the same parameters (excluding NO and sodium nitrite studies) in these patients at approximately 4 months, and yearly for 5 years
NCT00102271 Nitrite Infusion Studies Completed National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Phase 1 This study will examine 1) how nitrite (a natural blood substance that relaxes blood vessels) increases blood flow and lowers blood pressure, and 2) how to increase the effects of nitrite on blood pressure. Healthy volunteers between 21 and 40 years of age may be eligible for this study. They must be non-smokers and have no history of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or diabetes. Candidates are screened with a medical history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, and blood tests. This study is either done in the NIH Clinical Center intensive care unit or on the general clinical ward. Participants are enrolled in Part A of the study. After completion of Part A participants will be enrolled in Part B of the study. Part A: Participants lie in a reclining chair during the study. Small catheters (plastic tubes) are inserted into an artery and vein in the forearm. Another tube is placed in the vein of the opposite arm. Blood pressure cuffs are placed around the upper arm and wrist, and a strain gauge (a rubber band-like device) is placed around the forearm. This device helps us to measure blood flow through the arm. When the blood pressure cuffs are inflated, blood flows into the forearm, stretching the strain gauge at a rate proportional to the blood flow. Pressure cuffs and a strain gauge are also placed on the other arm. After 20 minutes, blood pressure and blood flow are measured in both forearms. Then blood is drawn from the tube in the right vein to measure blood counts, proteins, and other chemicals. Participants then are given small doses of either saline, ascorbic acid, or a medicine called oxypurinol, a form of a drug that is often taken to prevent gout. After 30 minutes, sodium nitrite is injected in increasing doses into the artery for 30 minutes. Blood flow is measured and blood is drawn every 5 minutes during the infusion. At the end of the 30 minutes, blood is drawn from the vein every 30 minutes for 3 hours. After 3 hours, sodium nitrite infusions are restarted for 2 hours and blood flow is measured and samples collected every 30 minutes during this period. Part B: Participants lie in a reclining chair during the study. A small catheter (plastic tube) is placed in the artery of the left forearm to draw blood samples. A larger catheter called a central line is placed in a deeper vein in the neck. Another tube is advanced through the central line into the chambers of the heart, through the heart valve, and into the lung artery to measure pressures in the heart and lungs. Blood is drawn after 30 minutes to obtain baseline measurements. Then saline (sterile salt water) is put into the tube in the lung artery. Blood pressure cuffs are placed around the upper arm and wrist, and a strain gauge (a rubber band-like device) is placed around the forearm, which helps us to measure flow through the arm. When the cuffs are inflated, blood flows into the forearm, stretching the strain gauge at a rate proportional to the blood flow. Pressure cuffs and a strain gauge are also placed on the other arm. After 20 minutes, blood pressure and blood flow are measured in the forearm and blood samples are drawn from the tube in the left artery to measure blood counts, proteins, and other chemicals. Subjects then breathe a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen through a facemask for 30 minutes, then room air for 30 minutes, and then the oxygen and nitrogen mixture for another 30 minutes. While breathing the mixture the second time, sodium nitrite is injected through the tube in the artery in three increasing doses for 5 minutes each. Every 5 minutes during the infusion blood is drawn from the tubes in the neck. Forearm blood flow is also measured every 5 minutes. After 30 minutes, the subject breathes room air for 3 hours and 15 minutes and then the sodium nitrite is injected again in three increasing doses for 5 minutes each. Every 5 minutes during the infusion blood is taken from the tube in the neck and forearm blood flow is measured
NCT00103025 Nitrite Infusion in Healthy Volunteers Completed National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Phase 1 This study will determine the dose of sodium nitrite that can safely be used to prevent constriction, or tightening, of the arteries. Narrowed arteries in the brain can cause stroke. Animal studies show that nitrite injections improve blood flow and that injections over long periods of time prevent damage to the arteries in the brain; however, there is no information on the effects of prolonged nitrite infusion in humans. This study will establish the safe dose and side effects of nitrite infusion in humans. Healthy normal volunteers between 21 and 60 years of age may be eligible for this study. Candidates are screened for high or low blood pressure, aspirin use, pregnancy, and blood levels of nitrite and methemoglobin (a substance that temporarily and slightly lowers the oxygen carried in the red blood cells). Pregnant women are excluded from the study. Participants are admitted to the Clinical Center for 16 1/4 days, the first 2 days in the hospital's intensive care unit (ICU). Upon admission they provide a medical history, have physical and cardiovascular examinations, and blood tests. For the infusion procedure, a catheter (thin plastic tube) is inserted into an artery in the wrist or the crease of the elbow to measure blood pressure, and catheters are placed in a vein in each arm for administering the nitrite and withdrawing blood samples. In the morning of day 1, after initial blood pressure and heart rate measurements are taken and a blood sample is drawn, a saline (salt water) infusion is started. Blood pressure and heart rate are monitored every 30 minutes for 6 hours, then every hour for 6 hours, then every 2 hours for 12 hours. Blood samples are collected every 4 hours for 24 hours. On day 2, the sodium nitrite infusion begins. Blood pressure and methemoglobin are monitored every 10 minutes for the first 2 hours. If blood pressure remains stable, the frequency of measurements is decreased to every 30 minutes for 4 hours, then every 1 hour for the next 6 hours, and then every 4 hours for 12 hours. If the pressure continues to remain stable, monitoring continues every 8 hours for the rest of the study. Blood is drawn periodically from the catheter to determine the amount of nitrite and methemoglobin in the body, with decreasing frequency from several times during the first hour of the infusion to every 24 hours. After the first 24 to 48 hours of the nitrite infusion, participants are transferred from the ICU to a general nursing unit fo...
NCT00105222 Effect of Nitrite on Exercise Physiology and Metabolism Terminated National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Phase 1 This study will examine how nitrite infusions affect exercise tolerance (how much a person can exercise before having to stop). Exercise ability is limited by how fast oxygen can be delivered to the body and how fast the body can produce energy. Both of these processes are affected by nitric oxide (NO), a gas produced by cells that line blood vessels. NO is important in regulating blood vessel dilation, and consequently, blood flow. Nitrite may act as a storehouse for nitric oxide and be able to improve exercise tolerance. Healthy normal volunteers between 21 and 45 years of age who can use an exercise bicycle may be eligible for this study. Candidates are screened with a medical history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, breathing tests, blood tests, and a pregnancy test for women who are able to bear children. Pregnant women are excluded from the study. The screening session includes practice exercise on the bicycle. Participants exercise on a stationery exercise bicycle for about 30 minutes on each of two study days. During the test, they breathe in and out of a mouthpiece that allows inhaled and exhaled respiratory gases to be measured. Before subjects begin to exercise, a small tube is placed in the artery of their forearm inside the elbow. A longer tube called a central line is placed in a deeper vein in the neck after the area has been numbed. A thinner tube, called a pulmonary artery catheter, is placed through the central line and advanced into the chambers of the heart, through the heart valve, and into the lung artery. This catheter measures various pressures directly in the heart and lungs. Blood samples are drawn through the catheter also, to avoid the need for multiple needle sticks. Another tube is placed in the vein of the other arm to deliver medications. Thirty minutes after all the tubes are placed, a blood sample is drawn for baseline measurements. Then, either saline (sterile salt water) or nitrite is injected into the tube in the arm vein. Thirty minutes after the injection, the subject starts exercising on the bicycle. The work setting on the bicycle is increased every minute, and the subject pedals until he or she is too tired to continue. During the test, a small blood sample is collected every 2 minutes. Heart rate, blood pressure, and heart rhythms are continuously monitored. After the test on the first day, participants are admitted to the hospital to rest for the remainder of the afternoon and evening. The tubes are kept in place for the following morning, when the procedure is repeated exactly as before, except that subjects who received saline the first day are given nitrite the second day, and vice versa.
Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary

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Clinical Trial Conditions for Sodium Nitrite

Condition Name

Condition Name for Sodium Nitrite
Intervention Trials
Heart Failure 5
Healthy 5
Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension 3
Sickle Cell Disease 3
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Sodium Nitrite
Intervention Trials
Hypertension 8
Anemia, Sickle Cell 5
Heart Failure 5
Hypertension, Pulmonary 4
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Clinical Trial Locations for Sodium Nitrite

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Sodium Nitrite
Location Trials
United States 58
Australia 6
United Kingdom 3
Denmark 2
Singapore 1
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Sodium Nitrite
Location Trials
Pennsylvania 13
Maryland 10
Colorado 4
Ohio 4
Washington 3
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Clinical Trial Progress for Sodium Nitrite

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Sodium Nitrite
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 1
Phase 3 2
Phase 2/Phase 3 2
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Sodium Nitrite
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 18
Recruiting 16
Not yet recruiting 5
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Sodium Nitrite

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Sodium Nitrite
Sponsor Trials
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) 9
University of Pittsburgh 9
Aires Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 5
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Sodium Nitrite
Sponsor Trials
Other 58
Industry 16
NIH 13
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Serving hundreds of leading biopharmaceutical companies globally:

Colorcon
Federal Trade Commission
Argus Health
Queensland Health
Cerilliant
Merck
Mallinckrodt
Chinese Patent Office
Johnson and Johnson

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