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Last Updated: May 27, 2022

CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR RILUZOLE


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All Clinical Trials for Riluzole

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00013624 ↗ Riluzole to Treat Parkinson's Disease Completed National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Phase 2 2001-03-01 This study will evaluate the effects of the drug riluzole on Parkinson's disease symptoms and on dyskinesias (involuntary movements) that develop as a result of long-term treatment with levodopa. Riluzole blocks the action of the chemical messenger glutamate, thought to be involved in producing Parkinson's symptoms. The drug is currently approved to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, another neurologic condition. Patients with relatively advanced Parkinson's disease between 20 and 80 years of age may be eligible for this 4-week study. Participants will have a complete medical history and physical examination, and a detailed neurological evaluation. The evaluations will include blood tests and an electrocardiogram, and possibly brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), CT scan, and chest X-ray. Participants will, if possible, stop taking all antiparkinsonian medications except levodopa (Sinemet) for one month before the study begins and throughout its duration. For the first 1 to 3 days, patients will be admitted to the NIH Clinical Center to undergo a levodopa "dose-finding" procedure. For this study, patients will stop taking their oral Sinemet and instead will have levodopa infused through a vein for up to 8 hours/day. During the infusions, the levodopa dose will be increased slowly until either 1) parkinsonian symptoms improve, 2) unacceptable side effects occur, or 3) the maximum study dose is reached. Symptoms will be monitored frequently to find two infusion rates: 1) one that is less than what is needed to relieve symptoms (suboptimal rate), and 2) one that relieves symptoms but may produce dyskinesias (optimal rate). When the dose-finding phase is completed, treatment will begin. Patients will take riluzole or placebo (a look-a-like pill with no active ingredient) twice a day, along with their regular Sinemet, for 3 weeks. (All participants will receive placebo at some time during the study, and some patients will receive only placebo throughout the entire 4 weeks.) At the end of each week, patients will be readmitted to the hospital and receive the previous week's dose of riluzole or placebo in combination with a levodopa infusion at the rate determined in the dose-finding phase of the study. The procedure for the infusion will be the same as that for the dose-finding phase. The dose of riluzole will be increased until the optimum dose has been achieved or until side effects occur (at which time the dose will be lowered or the drug stopped). Throughout the study, parkinsonian symptoms and dyskinesias will be evaluated using standardized rating scales and blood samples will be drawn periodically to measure drug levels.
NCT00026052 ↗ Riluzole to Treat Major Depression Completed National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Phase 2 2001-11-01 This study will examine the safety and effectiveness of the drug riluzole (RilutekĀ® (Registered Trademark)) for short-term treatment of depression symptoms, such as depressed mood, psychomotor retardation, and excessive sleeping. Despite the availability of a wide range of antidepressant drugs, studies indicate that 30 to 40 percent of patients with major depression do not respond to first-line antidepressant treatment with drugs such as fluoxetine, upropion, venlafaxine and others. Riluzole, which is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), causes chemical changes in the brain that may also have antidepressant properties. Patients between 18 and 70 years of age with major depressive disorder without psychotic features may be eligible for this 2-stage 7-week study. Candidates will be screened with a medical history and physical examination, including an electrocardiogram (EKG), blood and urine tests, and a psychiatric evaluation. A blood or urine sample will be tested for illegal drugs.Women of childbearing potential will have a pregnancy test. Participants will complete stage 1 of the study, which lasts 1 week, and may then continue with stage 2 for an additional 6 weeks. At the start of the study, patients will be tapered off all psychiatric medicines and will begin treatment with a placebo (a sugar pill formulated to look like the active drug). At some point, they will be switched from placebo to riluzole. In addition, participants will undergo the following procedures: - Physical examination and electrocardiograms (EKG) at the beginning and end of the study, with vital signs (temperature, blood pressure and heart rate) checked daily - Weekly 1-hour interviews consisting of psychiatric and psychomotor rating scales to assess treatment response - Weekly blood tests to measure blood levels of riluzole and evaluate drug side effects At the end of the study, participants' psychiatric status will be reassessed and appropriate long-term psychiatric treatment arranged. Patients, ages 18 to 70 with a diagnosis of major depression without psychotic features, will in this pilot study (single arm, single blind) receive riluzole (50-200 mg/day) for a period of 6 weeks. Acute efficacy will be determined by demonstrating a greater response rate using specified criteria. Approximately 25 patients will enter the study to obtain 22 subjects who complete the 6 weeks of acute riluzole treatment. Therefore, if 7/22 patients or greater have greater than 50% improvement on the primary efficacy measure, then based on statistically guidelines from the Optimal Two Stage Design for Clinical Trials, a controlled trial would be indicated to scientifically confirm the signal observed in the single arm trial.
NCT00047723 ↗ Minocycline to Treat Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Completed National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Phase 3 2003-01-01 The purpose of this trial is to test the safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of minocycline compared to placebo in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
NCT00054704 ↗ Riluzole to Treat Depression in Bipolar Disorder Terminated National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Phase 2 2003-02-01 This study examines if Riluzole, FDA approved for ALS, will improve symptoms of depression in Bipolar Disorder. Purpose: This study will examine the safety and effectiveness of riluzole (Rilutek trademark) for short-term treatment of depression symptoms, such as depressed mood, psychomotor retardation, and excessive sleeping in patients with bipolar disease. Riluzole is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease). Preliminary findings of a study using riluzole to treat acute depression in patients with unipolar depression indicate that it may have antidepressant properties in some patients. Patients between 18 and 70 years of age with bipolar I or II disorder without psychosis may be eligible for this 8-week study. Candidates must be currently depressed, must have had at least one previous major depressive episode, and must have failed to improve with prior treatment with at least one antidepressant. They will be screened with a medical history, physical examination, electrocardiogram (EKG), blood and urine tests, and psychiatric evaluation. A blood or urine sample will be analyzed for illegal drugs. Women of childbearing potential will have a pregnancy test. Participants will begin an 8-week course of treatment, starting with a placebo (a sugar pill formulated to look like the active drug) and, at some point, switching to riluzole. In addition to drug treatment, participants will undergo the following procedures: Physical examination and electrocardiogram (EKG) at the beginning and end of the study; Weekly check of vital signs (temperature, blood pressure and heart rate); Weekly 1-hour interviews consisting of psychiatric and psychomotor rating scales to assess treatment response; Weekly blood tests to measure blood levels of riluzole and evaluate drug side effects. At the end of the study, participants' psychiatric status will be reassessed and appropriate long-term psychiatric treatment arranged. Atendemos pacientes de habla hispana. We enroll eligible participants locally and from around the country. Travel arrangements are provided and costs covered by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). (Arrangements vary by distance and by specific study.) After completing the study participants receive short-term follow-up care while transitioning back to a provider.
NCT00202397 ↗ Effect of Riluzole as a Symptomatic Approach in Patients With Chronic Cerebellar Ataxia Completed S. Andrea Hospital Phase 2 2005-06-01 Cerebellar disorders are often disabling and symptomatic therapies are limited to few options that are partially effective. It seems therefore appropriate to search for additional approaches. Purkinje cells are the sole output of the cerebellar cortex: they project inhibitory signals to the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN), which have a critical role in cerebellar function and motor performance. DCN neurons fire spontaneously in the absence of synaptic input from Purkinje neurons and modulation of the DCN response by Purkinje input is believed to be responsible for coordination of movement. Recent evidences support the notion that an increase in DCN excitability may be an important step in the development of cerebellar ataxia and point to the underlying molecular mechanisms: the inhibition of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels, that causes an increase of the firing frequency in DCN, correlates with cerebellar ataxia. The rationale of the present project is that SK channel openers, such as riluzole, may have a beneficial effect on cerebellar ataxia. The researchers propose to perform a pilot study investigating safety and efficacy of riluzole, an approved treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as a symptomatic approach in patients with chronic cerebellar ataxia.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for Riluzole

Condition Name

Condition Name for Riluzole
Intervention Trials
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis 49
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) 9
ALS 7
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder 7
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Riluzole
Intervention Trials
Motor Neuron Disease 63
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis 63
Sclerosis 58
Disease 14
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Clinical Trial Locations for Riluzole

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Riluzole
Location Trials
United States 311
Canada 49
Germany 41
United Kingdom 17
France 16
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Riluzole
Location Trials
Maryland 20
California 19
Texas 16
New York 15
Arizona 15
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Clinical Trial Progress for Riluzole

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Riluzole
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 6
Phase 3 14
Phase 2/Phase 3 13
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Riluzole
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 73
Terminated 16
Unknown status 12
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Riluzole

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Riluzole
Sponsor Trials
Yale University 8
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) 7
Cytokinetics 6
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Riluzole
Sponsor Trials
Other 205
Industry 39
NIH 16
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