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Last Updated: May 27, 2022

CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR PENICILLIN V


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505(b)(2) Clinical Trials for Penicillin V

This table shows clinical trials for potential 505(b)(2) applications. See the next table for all clinical trials
Trial Type Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
New Indication NCT05069974 ↗ Alternative Antibiotics for Syphilis Recruiting FundaciĆ³n FLS de Lucha Contra el Sida, las Enfermedades Infecciosas y la PromociĆ³n de la Salud y la Ciencia Phase 3 2021-10-01 The Trep-AB clinical trial will test the efficacy of an investigational neuropenetrative drug, Linezolid (LZD), compared to standard treatment, Benzathine penicillin G (BPG), for early syphilis in humans. The overarching idea of the work proposed herein is to investigate the use of LZD to treat syphilis, conducting a randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate this new indication of a known antibacterial agent. It is estimated to include 360 participants.
>Trial Type >Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

All Clinical Trials for Penicillin V

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00000585 ↗ Penicillin Prophylaxis in Sickle Cell Disease (PROPS) Completed National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Phase 3 1983-08-01 To determine whether the regular daily administration of oral penicillin would reduce the incidence of documented infection due to Streptococcus pneumoniae in children with sickle cell anemia.
NCT00000648 ↗ A Pilot Study Evaluating Penicillin G and Ceftriaxone as Therapies for Presumed Neurosyphilis in HIV Seropositive Individuals Completed Hoffmann-La Roche N/A 1969-12-31 To provide information on the response of HIV infected, neurosyphilis patients to the currently recommended treatment for neurosyphilis; to determine whether possible co-infection with both HIV and syphilis makes more difficult the diagnosis of syphilis; to explore the usefulness of an alternative treatment which, if effective, would permit outpatient treatment for neurosyphilis that until now required prolonged hospitalization. Studies suggest that syphilis treatment failures may be more common in HIV infected patients than in patients without HIV infection and that treatment failures occur due to and/or are displayed as central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Very little is known about the best treatment course for neurosyphilis in patients who are also infected with HIV.
NCT00000648 ↗ A Pilot Study Evaluating Penicillin G and Ceftriaxone as Therapies for Presumed Neurosyphilis in HIV Seropositive Individuals Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) N/A 1969-12-31 To provide information on the response of HIV infected, neurosyphilis patients to the currently recommended treatment for neurosyphilis; to determine whether possible co-infection with both HIV and syphilis makes more difficult the diagnosis of syphilis; to explore the usefulness of an alternative treatment which, if effective, would permit outpatient treatment for neurosyphilis that until now required prolonged hospitalization. Studies suggest that syphilis treatment failures may be more common in HIV infected patients than in patients without HIV infection and that treatment failures occur due to and/or are displayed as central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Very little is known about the best treatment course for neurosyphilis in patients who are also infected with HIV.
NCT00001359 ↗ Preventive Measures for Childhood-Onset Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Tic Disorders (PANDAS Subgroup) Completed National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Phase 2 1993-04-01 A subgroup of patients with childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and/or tic disorders has been identified who share a common clinical course characterized by dramatic onset and symptom exacerbations following group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infections. This subgroup is designated by the acronym PANDAS (Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infections). There are five clinical characteristics that define the PANDAS subgroup: presence of OCD and/or tic disorder; prepubertal symptom onset; sudden onset or abrupt exacerbations (relapsing-remitting course); association with neurological abnormalities (presence of adventitious movements or motoric hyperactivity during exacerbations); and temporal association between symptom exacerbations and GABHS infections. In this subgroup, periodic exacerbations appear to be triggered by GABHS infections in a manner similar to that of Sydenham's chorea, the neurological variant of rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever is a disorder with a presumed post-streptococcal autoimmune etiology. The streptococcal pathogenesis of rheumatic fever is supported by studies that have demonstrated the effectiveness of penicillin prophylaxis in preventing recurrences of this illness. A trial of penicillin prophylaxis in the PANDAS subgroup demonstrated that penicillin was not superior to placebo as prophylaxis against GABHS infections in these children, but this outcome was felt to be secondary to non-compliance with treatment, and there was no decrease in the number of neuropsychiatric symptom exacerbations in this group. In a study comparing azithromycin and penicillin, both drugs were completely effective in preventing streptococcal infections - there were no documented titer elevations during the year-long study period for children taking either penicillin or azithromycin. Comparable reductions in the severity of tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms were also observed. Thus, penicillin was not performing as an "active placebo" as originally postulated, but rather provided effective prophylaxis against Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal. Both azithromycin and penicillin appear to be effective in eliminating GABHS infections, and reducing neuropsychiatric symptom severity; thus, between-group differences are negligible. Since increasing the "n" to demonstrate superiority of one prophylactic agent over another would be impractical, we have amended the study design to address two issues: 1. To determine if antibiotics prophylaxis against GABHS infections is superior to placebo in prolonging periods of remission among children in the PANDAS subgroup. 2. To determine if antibiotics prophylaxis against GABHS infections is superior to placebo in improving overall symptom severity for obsessive-compulsive symptoms and tics among children in the PANDAS subgroup. Because penicillin has a narrower therapeutic index and is less expensive than azithromycin, it is the preferable prophylactic agent. Further, penicillin (250 mg orally twice a day) has a long history of providing safe and effective prophylaxis for rheumatic fever and is the first line oral therapy recommended by the American Heart Association. Thus, penicillin has been chosen as the prophylactic antibiotic in the present study. Blister packs are used to increase compliance and to allow for easier documentation of missed doses.
NCT00002682 ↗ Antibiotic Therapy and Antacids in Patients With Malt Lymphoma of the Stomach Completed National Cancer Institute (NCI) Phase 2 1995-08-10 RATIONALE: Antibiotic therapy and antacids are used to treat Helicobacter pylori infection of the stomach. These treatments may also have an effect on gastric MALT lymphoma of the stomach. PURPOSE: Phase II trial to study the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy with amoxicillin, clarithromycin, tetracycline, and metronidazole plus antacids in patients with MALT lymphoma of the stomach.
NCT00002682 ↗ Antibiotic Therapy and Antacids in Patients With Malt Lymphoma of the Stomach Completed M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Phase 2 1995-08-10 RATIONALE: Antibiotic therapy and antacids are used to treat Helicobacter pylori infection of the stomach. These treatments may also have an effect on gastric MALT lymphoma of the stomach. PURPOSE: Phase II trial to study the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy with amoxicillin, clarithromycin, tetracycline, and metronidazole plus antacids in patients with MALT lymphoma of the stomach.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for Penicillin V

Condition Name

Condition Name for Penicillin V
Intervention Trials
Syphilis 9
Penicillin Allergy 8
Helicobacter Pylori Infection 8
Pneumonia 7
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Penicillin V
Intervention Trials
Infections 27
Infection 25
Communicable Diseases 20
Pneumonia 12
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Clinical Trial Locations for Penicillin V

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Penicillin V
Location Trials
United States 196
Canada 19
Australia 18
China 18
Kenya 11
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Penicillin V
Location Trials
California 14
Ohio 12
New York 11
Texas 9
North Carolina 9
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Clinical Trial Progress for Penicillin V

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Penicillin V
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 54
Phase 3 38
Phase 2/Phase 3 2
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Penicillin V
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 85
Unknown status 26
Recruiting 23
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Penicillin V

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Penicillin V
Sponsor Trials
World Health Organization 7
University of Oxford 5
Sanofi 4
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Penicillin V
Sponsor Trials
Other 320
Industry 25
NIH 9
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