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Last Updated: September 23, 2021

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR MELPHALAN

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505(b)(2) Clinical Trials for Melphalan

This table shows clinical trials for potential 505(b)(2) applications. See the next table for all clinical trials
Trial Type Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
New Combination NCT00116961 ↗ Velcade, Doxil, and Dexamethasone (VDd) as First Line Therapy for Multiple Myeloma Completed University of Michigan Cancer Center Phase 2 2005-06-01 This is a research study for patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma remains a non-curable disease however, newer medications and their combinations appear to provide higher response rates and higher complete response rates than current treatment options. One of the new medications in multiple myeloma is Velcade. Preliminary results from a study using a combination of Velcade with Doxil have shown high response rates (disease reduction). Preliminary results also show that an addition of dexamethasone to Velcade in patients not responding to Velcade alone showed improved response rates. This study involves treatment with a new combination of three standard medications: Velcade, Doxil, and dexamethasone (VDd combination). The proposed combination of all three drugs may improve efficacy and response. Velcade is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment in multiple myeloma patients who have received at least two prior therapies and have demonstrated disease progression on the last therapy. Velcade is still currently under investigation for other indications. Doxil is not approved for use in multiple myeloma but is an approved drug for use in patients with some other cancers. Several published clinical trials provide evidence that Doxil is an active agent in multiple myeloma and it is used in treatment combinations for multiple myeloma in general practice. Dexamethasone is a standard therapy for multiple myeloma, but is not approved by the FDA for that use. The combination of all three drugs is experimental (not FDA approved). The goals of this study are to determine if this new combination therapy with Velcade, Doxil and dexamethasone is an effective treatment and also to determine the side effects that occur when this combination treatment is given.
New Combination NCT02188368 ↗ Pomalidomide for Lenalidomide for Failures Recruiting Celgene Corporation Phase 2 2014-08-01 The purpose of this clinical research study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness (good and bad effects) of pomalidomide given as part of a combination therapy that include more than just steroids to treat subjects with relapsed (subjects whose disease came back) or refractory (subjects whose disease did not respond to past treatment) multiple myeloma (MM). Pomalidomide (alone or in combination with dexamethasone) has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of MM patients who have received at least two prior therapies, including lenalidomide and bortezomib, and have demonstrated disease progression on or within 60 days of completion of their last therapy. However, the use of pomalidomide in combination with other drugs used to treat MM, such as chemotherapeutic agents and proteasome inhibitors, is currently being tested and is not approved. Pomalidomide is in the same drug class as thalidomide and lenalidomide. Like lenalidomide, pomalidomide is a drug that alters the immune system and it may also interfere with the development of small blood vessels that help support tumor growth. Therefore, in theory, it may reduce or prevent the growth of cancer cells. The testing done with pomalidomide thus far has shown that it is well-tolerated and effective for subjects with MM both on its own and in combination with dexamethasone. Using another drug class, namely proteasome inhibitors, we have demonstrated that simply replacing a proteasome inhibitor with another in an established anti-myeloma treatment regimen can frequently overcome resistance regardless of the other agents that are part of the anti-myeloma regimen. Importantly, the toxicity profile of the new combinations closely resembled that of the proteasome inhibitor administered as a single agent. Based on this experience, we hypothesize that the replacement of lenalidomide with pomalidomide will yield similar results in a similar relapsed/refractory MM patient population.
New Combination NCT02188368 ↗ Pomalidomide for Lenalidomide for Failures Recruiting Oncotherapeutics Phase 2 2014-08-01 The purpose of this clinical research study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness (good and bad effects) of pomalidomide given as part of a combination therapy that include more than just steroids to treat subjects with relapsed (subjects whose disease came back) or refractory (subjects whose disease did not respond to past treatment) multiple myeloma (MM). Pomalidomide (alone or in combination with dexamethasone) has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of MM patients who have received at least two prior therapies, including lenalidomide and bortezomib, and have demonstrated disease progression on or within 60 days of completion of their last therapy. However, the use of pomalidomide in combination with other drugs used to treat MM, such as chemotherapeutic agents and proteasome inhibitors, is currently being tested and is not approved. Pomalidomide is in the same drug class as thalidomide and lenalidomide. Like lenalidomide, pomalidomide is a drug that alters the immune system and it may also interfere with the development of small blood vessels that help support tumor growth. Therefore, in theory, it may reduce or prevent the growth of cancer cells. The testing done with pomalidomide thus far has shown that it is well-tolerated and effective for subjects with MM both on its own and in combination with dexamethasone. Using another drug class, namely proteasome inhibitors, we have demonstrated that simply replacing a proteasome inhibitor with another in an established anti-myeloma treatment regimen can frequently overcome resistance regardless of the other agents that are part of the anti-myeloma regimen. Importantly, the toxicity profile of the new combinations closely resembled that of the proteasome inhibitor administered as a single agent. Based on this experience, we hypothesize that the replacement of lenalidomide with pomalidomide will yield similar results in a similar relapsed/refractory MM patient population.
>Trial Type >Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

All Clinical Trials for Melphalan

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00001296 ↗ A Randomized Phase III Trial of Hyperthermic Isolated Limb Perfusion With Melphalan, Tumor Necrosis Factor, and Interferon-Gamma in Patients With Locally Advanced Extremity Melanoma Completed National Cancer Institute (NCI) Phase 3 1992-02-01 Randomized study. Initially, 3 patients will be entered on Arm I as a pilot feasibility study and to standardize the technical aspects of the study. Subsequently, all patients are randomized to Arms I and II. Arm I: Regional Hyperthermia plus Regional Single-Agent Chemotherapy. Hyperthermic intravenous limb perfusion, HILP; plus Melphalan, L-PAM, NSC-8806. Arm II: Regional Hyperthermia plus Regional Single-Agent Chemotherapy and Biological Response Modifier Therapy. HILP as in Arm I; plus L-PAM; and Tumor Necrosis Factor (Knoll), TNF, NSC-635257; Interferon gamma (Genentech), IFN-G, NSC-600662.
NCT00001335 ↗ New Therapeutic Strategies for Patients With Ewing's Sarcoma Family of Tumors, High Risk Rhabdomyosarcoma, and Neuroblastoma Completed National Cancer Institute (NCI) Phase 2 1993-04-01 The prognosis for patients with metastatic Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESF), rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), and neuroblastoma (NBL) remains dismal, with less than 25% long-term disease-free survival. Though less grave, the prognosis for cure for other high-risk patients is approximately 50%. New treatment strategies, including the identification of highly active new agents, maximizing the dose intensity of the most active standard drugs, and the development of improved methods of consolidation to eradicate microscopic residual disease, are clearly needed to improve the outcome of these patients. This protocol will address these issues by commencing with a Phase II window, for the highest risk patients, to evaluate a series of promising drugs with novel mechanisms of action. All patients will then receive 5 cycles of dose-intensive "best standard therapy" with doxorubicin (adriamycin), vincristine, and cyclophosphamide (VAdriaC). Patients at high risk of relapse will continue onto a phase I consolidation regimen consisting of three cycles of dose-escalated Melphalan, Ifosfamide, Mesna, and Etoposide (MIME). Peripheral blood stem cell transfusions (PBSCT) and recombinant human G-CSF will be used as supportive care measures to allow maximal dose-escalation of this combination regimen.
NCT00001507 ↗ Chemotherapy and Progenitor Cell Transplantation to Treat Inflammatory Breast Cancer Completed National Cancer Institute (NCI) Phase 1 1996-07-01 This study will evaluate the effectiveness of combination chemotherapy with paclitaxel (Taxol) and cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), followed by high-dose melphalan and etoposide for treating inflammatory breast cancer. Patients also receive infusions of their own previously collected progenitor cells (primitive cells that can make new cells to replace ones destroyed by chemotherapy). Patients 18 years of age or older with stage IIIB inflammatory breast cancer that has not metastasized (spread beyond the breast) may be eligible for this study. Candidates are screened with a medical history and physical examination, blood and urine tests, and chest x-ray. They have computed tomography (CT) of the head, chest, abdomen and pelvis as well as a bone scan to determine the extent of disease, and a nuclear medicine scan called MUGA to examine the heart's pumping ability. They may receive a rehabilitation medicine evaluation. Participants undergo the following tests and procedures: - Central venous line placement: Patients have a central venous line (plastic tube) placed into a major vein in the chest before beginning treatment. The line remains in the body throughout treatment and is used to give chemotherapy and other medications and to withdraw blood samples. The line is usually placed under local anesthesia in the radiology department or the operating room. - Chemotherapy: Patients receive two or more cycles of paclitaxel and cyclophosphamide. Paclitaxel is given intravenously (I.V., through a vein) for 72 hours using a portable pump. Cyclophosphamide is given daily for 3 days I.V. over 1 hour. The cycles may be 28 days apart. A drug called Mesna is given with this treatment to protect the bladder from irritation from cyclophosphamide. Patients who have not previously been treated with doxorubicin (Adriamycin) may receive a maximum of four cycles of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide by vein on a single day during each cycle, with cycles 21 days apart. When all the paclitaxel/cyclophosphamide cycles are completed, patients receive melphalan and etoposide, both drugs I.V. over 1 to 8 hours for three consecutive days. - G-CSF treatment: After each paclitaxel/cyclophosphamide cycle and after the melphalan/etoposide treatment, patients are given a drug called G-CSF. G-CSF, injected under the skin, stimulates production of infection-fighting white blood cells. - Apheresis: This is a procedure to collect progenitor cells for later reinfusion. For this procedure, blood is collected through a catheter (plastic tube) placed in an arm vein. The blood is circulated through a cell-separating machine, where the white cells, including the progenitor cells, are extracted, and the red cells are returned to the patient through another catheter in the other arm. Apheresis is done after each of two cycles of paclitaxel/cyclophosphamide. - Progenitor cell transplant: Progenitor cells are reinfused after melphalan/etoposide treatment. - Glucose infusion: A salt solution with chemically modified glucose is infused I.V. over a period of from 12 to 48 hours, with subsequent donation of blood cells for blood and immune system studies. Patients have a maximum of two glucose infusions, separated by at least 3 months. - Tumor biopsy: Some patients have a biopsy of their tumor (removal of a small piece of tumor tissue for microscopic study) before starting chemotherapy. - Blood tests: Blood is drawn frequently to monitor safety and treatment response, and for research purposes. - Dental consultation: Some patients may have a dental consultation before the progenitor cell transplant.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for Melphalan

Condition Name

Condition Name for Melphalan
Intervention Trials
Multiple Myeloma 234
Lymphoma 115
Leukemia 71
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Melphalan
Intervention Trials
Multiple Myeloma 359
Neoplasms, Plasma Cell 329
Lymphoma 174
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Clinical Trial Locations for Melphalan

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Melphalan
Location Trials
Canada 100
Spain 78
United Kingdom 78
Italy 67
France 62
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Melphalan
Location Trials
New York 132
Texas 122
California 111
Florida 75
Washington 74
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Clinical Trial Progress for Melphalan

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Melphalan
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 5
Phase 3 123
Phase 2/Phase 3 14
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Melphalan
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 278
Recruiting 206
Active, not recruiting 96
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Melphalan

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Melphalan
Sponsor Trials
National Cancer Institute (NCI) 212
M.D. Anderson Cancer Center 68
City of Hope Medical Center 32
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Melphalan
Sponsor Trials
Other 967
NIH 236
Industry 229
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