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Last Updated: September 27, 2020

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR INFUMORPH

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All Clinical Trials for INFUMORPH

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00385541 Comparison of Side Effects of Morphine and Hydromorphone Patient-Controlled Analgesia (PCA) Completed Columbia University Phase 4 2003-11-01 Both morphine and hydromorphone are pain medications commonly used after surgery. It is thought at our institution that hydromorphone causes less side effects but this has not been studied. We propose to treat our patients with either morphine or hydromorphone and determine how much nausea, vomiting, and itching they have with each drug
NCT02222246 Comparing Acute Pain Management Protocols for Patients With Sickle Cell Disease Completed Mount Sinai Hospital, New York Phase 4 2015-03-01 The goal of this pilot study is to improve emergency department (ED) pain management for adults with sickle cell disease. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common genetic disorder in the United States, and occurs primarily among African Americans. Management of painful episodes associated with SCD, referred to as vaso-occlusive crises (VOC), is the most common reason for SCD patients to visit the ED. Currently, there is no standard approach to managing VOC pain in the ED that is widely accepted and used, and pain management for vaso-occlusive crisis in persons with SCD is very different between providers and not based on research. Many times, patients who come to the ED with sickle cell pain feel that they do not receive adequate pain control. If EDs could provide efficient, effective, safe, patient-centered analgesic management, it may be possible to improve pain management for adults with SCD experiencing a VOC. Guidelines for treating vaso-occlusive crises caused by sickle cell disease will soon be published by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. These guidelines recommend patient-specific pain treatment protocols or a standardized pain management protocol for SCD when a patient does not already have a pain treatment protocol designed for them. The purpose of this pilot study is to compare these two ways to treat vaso-occlusive pain in the ED for adults with sickle cell disease, and to determine if a large randomized controlled trial is feasible and required.
NCT02222246 Comparing Acute Pain Management Protocols for Patients With Sickle Cell Disease Completed National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Phase 4 2015-03-01 The goal of this pilot study is to improve emergency department (ED) pain management for adults with sickle cell disease. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common genetic disorder in the United States, and occurs primarily among African Americans. Management of painful episodes associated with SCD, referred to as vaso-occlusive crises (VOC), is the most common reason for SCD patients to visit the ED. Currently, there is no standard approach to managing VOC pain in the ED that is widely accepted and used, and pain management for vaso-occlusive crisis in persons with SCD is very different between providers and not based on research. Many times, patients who come to the ED with sickle cell pain feel that they do not receive adequate pain control. If EDs could provide efficient, effective, safe, patient-centered analgesic management, it may be possible to improve pain management for adults with SCD experiencing a VOC. Guidelines for treating vaso-occlusive crises caused by sickle cell disease will soon be published by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. These guidelines recommend patient-specific pain treatment protocols or a standardized pain management protocol for SCD when a patient does not already have a pain treatment protocol designed for them. The purpose of this pilot study is to compare these two ways to treat vaso-occlusive pain in the ED for adults with sickle cell disease, and to determine if a large randomized controlled trial is feasible and required.
NCT02222246 Comparing Acute Pain Management Protocols for Patients With Sickle Cell Disease Completed National Institutes of Health (NIH) Phase 4 2015-03-01 The goal of this pilot study is to improve emergency department (ED) pain management for adults with sickle cell disease. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common genetic disorder in the United States, and occurs primarily among African Americans. Management of painful episodes associated with SCD, referred to as vaso-occlusive crises (VOC), is the most common reason for SCD patients to visit the ED. Currently, there is no standard approach to managing VOC pain in the ED that is widely accepted and used, and pain management for vaso-occlusive crisis in persons with SCD is very different between providers and not based on research. Many times, patients who come to the ED with sickle cell pain feel that they do not receive adequate pain control. If EDs could provide efficient, effective, safe, patient-centered analgesic management, it may be possible to improve pain management for adults with SCD experiencing a VOC. Guidelines for treating vaso-occlusive crises caused by sickle cell disease will soon be published by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. These guidelines recommend patient-specific pain treatment protocols or a standardized pain management protocol for SCD when a patient does not already have a pain treatment protocol designed for them. The purpose of this pilot study is to compare these two ways to treat vaso-occlusive pain in the ED for adults with sickle cell disease, and to determine if a large randomized controlled trial is feasible and required.
NCT02222246 Comparing Acute Pain Management Protocols for Patients With Sickle Cell Disease Completed University of Cincinnati Phase 4 2015-03-01 The goal of this pilot study is to improve emergency department (ED) pain management for adults with sickle cell disease. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common genetic disorder in the United States, and occurs primarily among African Americans. Management of painful episodes associated with SCD, referred to as vaso-occlusive crises (VOC), is the most common reason for SCD patients to visit the ED. Currently, there is no standard approach to managing VOC pain in the ED that is widely accepted and used, and pain management for vaso-occlusive crisis in persons with SCD is very different between providers and not based on research. Many times, patients who come to the ED with sickle cell pain feel that they do not receive adequate pain control. If EDs could provide efficient, effective, safe, patient-centered analgesic management, it may be possible to improve pain management for adults with SCD experiencing a VOC. Guidelines for treating vaso-occlusive crises caused by sickle cell disease will soon be published by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. These guidelines recommend patient-specific pain treatment protocols or a standardized pain management protocol for SCD when a patient does not already have a pain treatment protocol designed for them. The purpose of this pilot study is to compare these two ways to treat vaso-occlusive pain in the ED for adults with sickle cell disease, and to determine if a large randomized controlled trial is feasible and required.
NCT02222246 Comparing Acute Pain Management Protocols for Patients With Sickle Cell Disease Completed Duke University Phase 4 2015-03-01 The goal of this pilot study is to improve emergency department (ED) pain management for adults with sickle cell disease. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common genetic disorder in the United States, and occurs primarily among African Americans. Management of painful episodes associated with SCD, referred to as vaso-occlusive crises (VOC), is the most common reason for SCD patients to visit the ED. Currently, there is no standard approach to managing VOC pain in the ED that is widely accepted and used, and pain management for vaso-occlusive crisis in persons with SCD is very different between providers and not based on research. Many times, patients who come to the ED with sickle cell pain feel that they do not receive adequate pain control. If EDs could provide efficient, effective, safe, patient-centered analgesic management, it may be possible to improve pain management for adults with SCD experiencing a VOC. Guidelines for treating vaso-occlusive crises caused by sickle cell disease will soon be published by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. These guidelines recommend patient-specific pain treatment protocols or a standardized pain management protocol for SCD when a patient does not already have a pain treatment protocol designed for them. The purpose of this pilot study is to compare these two ways to treat vaso-occlusive pain in the ED for adults with sickle cell disease, and to determine if a large randomized controlled trial is feasible and required.
NCT02716129 The Effect of Adding Nalbuphine to Intrathecal Morphine on Analgesic Efficacy and Side Effects After Cesarean Section Not yet recruiting Abdelrady S Ibrahim, MD Phase 2 2016-03-01 The primary endpoint of this study is to investigate the effect of adding nalbuphine to intrathecal morphine on quality of postoperative analgesia and Morphine related side effects post- cesarean delivery.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for INFUMORPH

Condition Name

Condition Name for INFUMORPH
Intervention Trials
Sickle Cell Disease 1
Postoperative Pain 1
Post Operative Pain 1
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for INFUMORPH
Intervention Trials
Pain, Postoperative 2
Anemia, Sickle Cell 1
Acute Pain 1
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Clinical Trial Locations for INFUMORPH

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for INFUMORPH
Location Trials
United States 3
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for INFUMORPH
Location Trials
New York 2
Ohio 1
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Clinical Trial Progress for INFUMORPH

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for INFUMORPH
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 2
Phase 2 1
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for INFUMORPH
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 2
Not yet recruiting 1
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for INFUMORPH

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for INFUMORPH
Sponsor Trials
Duke University 1
University of Cincinnati 1
National Institutes of Health (NIH) 1
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for INFUMORPH
Sponsor Trials
Other 5
NIH 2
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