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Last Updated: November 27, 2022

CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR FINGOLIMOD


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All Clinical Trials for Fingolimod

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00273364 ↗ Stem Cell Therapy for Patients With Multiple Sclerosis Failing Alternate Approved Therapy- A Randomized Study Completed Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust Phase 2 2005-11-16 Multiple sclerosis (MS) is at onset an immune-mediated demyelinating disease. In most cases, it starts as a relapsing-remitting disease with distinct attacks and no symptoms between flares. Over years or decades, virtually all cases transition into a progressive disease in which insidious and slow neurologic deterioration occurs with or without acute flares. Relapsing-remitting disease is often responsive to immune suppressive or modulating therapies, while immune based therapies are generally ineffective in patients with a progressive clinical course. This clinical course and response to immune suppression, as well as neuropathology and neuroimaging studies, suggest that disease progression is associated with axonal atrophy. Disability correlates better with measures of axonal atrophy than immune mediated demyelination. Therefore, immune based therapies, in order to be effective, need to be started early in the disease course while MS is predominately an immune-mediated and inflammatory disease. While current immune based therapies delay disability, no intervention has been proven to prevent progressive disability. We propose, as a randomized study, autologous unmanipulated PBSCT using a conditioning regimen of cyclophosphamide and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) versus FDA approved standard of care (i.e. interferon, glatiramer acetate, mitoxantrone, natalizumab, fingolimod, or tecfidera) in patients with inflammatory (relapsing) MS despite treatment with alternate approved therapy.
NCT00273364 ↗ Stem Cell Therapy for Patients With Multiple Sclerosis Failing Alternate Approved Therapy- A Randomized Study Completed University of Sao Paulo Phase 2 2005-11-16 Multiple sclerosis (MS) is at onset an immune-mediated demyelinating disease. In most cases, it starts as a relapsing-remitting disease with distinct attacks and no symptoms between flares. Over years or decades, virtually all cases transition into a progressive disease in which insidious and slow neurologic deterioration occurs with or without acute flares. Relapsing-remitting disease is often responsive to immune suppressive or modulating therapies, while immune based therapies are generally ineffective in patients with a progressive clinical course. This clinical course and response to immune suppression, as well as neuropathology and neuroimaging studies, suggest that disease progression is associated with axonal atrophy. Disability correlates better with measures of axonal atrophy than immune mediated demyelination. Therefore, immune based therapies, in order to be effective, need to be started early in the disease course while MS is predominately an immune-mediated and inflammatory disease. While current immune based therapies delay disability, no intervention has been proven to prevent progressive disability. We propose, as a randomized study, autologous unmanipulated PBSCT using a conditioning regimen of cyclophosphamide and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) versus FDA approved standard of care (i.e. interferon, glatiramer acetate, mitoxantrone, natalizumab, fingolimod, or tecfidera) in patients with inflammatory (relapsing) MS despite treatment with alternate approved therapy.
NCT00273364 ↗ Stem Cell Therapy for Patients With Multiple Sclerosis Failing Alternate Approved Therapy- A Randomized Study Completed Uppsala University Phase 2 2005-11-16 Multiple sclerosis (MS) is at onset an immune-mediated demyelinating disease. In most cases, it starts as a relapsing-remitting disease with distinct attacks and no symptoms between flares. Over years or decades, virtually all cases transition into a progressive disease in which insidious and slow neurologic deterioration occurs with or without acute flares. Relapsing-remitting disease is often responsive to immune suppressive or modulating therapies, while immune based therapies are generally ineffective in patients with a progressive clinical course. This clinical course and response to immune suppression, as well as neuropathology and neuroimaging studies, suggest that disease progression is associated with axonal atrophy. Disability correlates better with measures of axonal atrophy than immune mediated demyelination. Therefore, immune based therapies, in order to be effective, need to be started early in the disease course while MS is predominately an immune-mediated and inflammatory disease. While current immune based therapies delay disability, no intervention has been proven to prevent progressive disability. We propose, as a randomized study, autologous unmanipulated PBSCT using a conditioning regimen of cyclophosphamide and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) versus FDA approved standard of care (i.e. interferon, glatiramer acetate, mitoxantrone, natalizumab, fingolimod, or tecfidera) in patients with inflammatory (relapsing) MS despite treatment with alternate approved therapy.
NCT00273364 ↗ Stem Cell Therapy for Patients With Multiple Sclerosis Failing Alternate Approved Therapy- A Randomized Study Completed Northwestern University Phase 2 2005-11-16 Multiple sclerosis (MS) is at onset an immune-mediated demyelinating disease. In most cases, it starts as a relapsing-remitting disease with distinct attacks and no symptoms between flares. Over years or decades, virtually all cases transition into a progressive disease in which insidious and slow neurologic deterioration occurs with or without acute flares. Relapsing-remitting disease is often responsive to immune suppressive or modulating therapies, while immune based therapies are generally ineffective in patients with a progressive clinical course. This clinical course and response to immune suppression, as well as neuropathology and neuroimaging studies, suggest that disease progression is associated with axonal atrophy. Disability correlates better with measures of axonal atrophy than immune mediated demyelination. Therefore, immune based therapies, in order to be effective, need to be started early in the disease course while MS is predominately an immune-mediated and inflammatory disease. While current immune based therapies delay disability, no intervention has been proven to prevent progressive disability. We propose, as a randomized study, autologous unmanipulated PBSCT using a conditioning regimen of cyclophosphamide and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) versus FDA approved standard of care (i.e. interferon, glatiramer acetate, mitoxantrone, natalizumab, fingolimod, or tecfidera) in patients with inflammatory (relapsing) MS despite treatment with alternate approved therapy.
NCT00289978 ↗ Efficacy and Safety of Fingolimod in Patients With Relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis Completed Novartis Phase 3 2006-01-01 This study assessed the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of 2 doses of oral fingolimod (1.25 mg/day and 0.5 mg/day) compared to placebo in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS)
NCT00340834 ↗ Efficacy and Safety of Fingolimod in Patients With Relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis With Optional Extension Phase Completed Novartis Phase 3 2006-05-01 This study assessed the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of 2 doses of oral fingolimod versus interferon β-1a to reduce the frequency of relapses in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for Fingolimod

Condition Name

Condition Name for Fingolimod
Intervention Trials
Multiple Sclerosis 21
Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis 9
Relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis 7
Stroke 4
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Fingolimod
Intervention Trials
Multiple Sclerosis 53
Sclerosis 51
Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting 33
Stroke 5
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Clinical Trial Locations for Fingolimod

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Fingolimod
Location Trials
United States 366
Italy 102
Canada 62
Spain 53
Australia 33
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Fingolimod
Location Trials
Texas 17
Florida 16
Ohio 14
California 14
Illinois 13
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Clinical Trial Progress for Fingolimod

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Fingolimod
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 26
Phase 3 15
Phase 2/Phase 3 2
[disabled in preview] 20
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Fingolimod
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 40
Recruiting 11
Terminated 10
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Fingolimod

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Fingolimod
Sponsor Trials
Novartis Pharmaceuticals 32
Novartis 11
Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust 3
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Fingolimod
Sponsor Trials
Other 56
Industry 55
NIH 2
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