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Last Updated: August 6, 2020

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR FERAHEME

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505(b)(2) Clinical Trials for FERAHEME

This table shows clinical trials for potential 505(b)(2) applications. See the next table for all clinical trials
Trial Type Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
OTC NCT02189889 Active Preoperative Anemia Management in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery Recruiting AMAG Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Phase 1/Phase 2 2013-04-01 Anemia which is a decreased blood count or lower than normal hemoglobin (hgb), is a major health problem for patients having heart surgery. Hemoglobin is the part of our blood that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Anemia that is present before surgery, called preoperative anemia, is a risk factor for an increased chance of morbidity (illness) and/or mortality (death) after heart surgery. It is also an important indicator of blood transfusion necessity. Recent clinical research investigations done to study preoperative anemia suggest a blood transfusion can damage the immune system (the system that protects us from disease) which can lead to infection, organ dysfunction (especially of the heart, kidney, brain), prolonged hospital stays, as well as increased supplies, resources and cost in surgical patients. Comprehensive anemia management can reduce or eliminate the need for blood transfusions and provide better outcomes after surgery. Therefore, controlling anemia before surgery is extremely important, and could be a lifesaving measure. This pilot, feasibility study is being done for several reasons. First of all, it will test the the safety and effectiveness of using a short-course of two medications, erythropoietin (EPO) and Feraheme (iron given intravenously [IV]), to increase hemoglobin levels in order to improve preoperative anemia, reduce transfusions and lower postoperative complications in anemic patients undergoing heart surgery. Secondly, findings will be used to design a large randomized controlled trial (RCT). The RCT will establish a protocol to actively manage anemia before surgery, thus reducing transfusions during surgery and improving recovery afterwards. It will also help identify valuable information regarding what needs to be done for timely completion of the planned RCT. EPO is a medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) used to treat anemia in patients with certain conditions in order to reduce blood transfusions. And although approved for use during surgery, it has not been FDA approved for use in cardiac (heart) or vascular (blood vessels, including veins and arteries) surgery. Common side effects include nausea, vomiting, itching, headache, injection site pain, chills, deep vein thrombosis (blood clot), cough, and changes in blood pressure (BP). Feraheme is an iron replacement product approved for the treatment of low iron anemia in adult patients. It may cause serious allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis (severe, whole body allergic reaction), as well as low BP and excessive iron storage. Patients meeting all eligibility requirements that consent to participate will be randomized into the study. Randomization is being placed by chance (like a flip of a coin) into one of two study groups, the treatment group or the control group. There is an equal chance of being placed into either group, which will be done by a computer. 1. The Treatment Group will receive a 300 unit (U) per kilogram (kg) injection of EPO and a 510 milligram (mg) IV infusion of Feraheme 7-28 days before the day of surgery. And again 1-7 days before the day of surgery, a second dose of both of these medications will be given. The third dose, of EPO only, will be administered 2 days after surgery. Before initiating a dose or giving a subsequent dose, laboratory parameters will be measured to assess the hemoglobin level and response to the medication. If blood values increase too rapidly or are too high, the meds will not be started or, if already dosed, they will not be given again. 2. The Control Group will receive no preoperative intervention for anemia unless lab results show iron deficiency anemia. The control group will be screened for the presence of iron deficiency anemia by evaluating blood laboratory values drawn during the baseline or preoperative visit. If lab results indicate iron deficiency anemia, over-the-counter oral iron will be recommended, to take until the day of surgery. In doing so, patients may benefit by potentially reducing the need for blood transfusions. Data will be collected from all participants from the preoperative visits throughout the admission, including lab results, medications, vital signs, information about the procedure, transfusions, and any problems or adverse events.
OTC NCT02189889 Active Preoperative Anemia Management in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery Recruiting University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Phase 1/Phase 2 2013-04-01 Anemia which is a decreased blood count or lower than normal hemoglobin (hgb), is a major health problem for patients having heart surgery. Hemoglobin is the part of our blood that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Anemia that is present before surgery, called preoperative anemia, is a risk factor for an increased chance of morbidity (illness) and/or mortality (death) after heart surgery. It is also an important indicator of blood transfusion necessity. Recent clinical research investigations done to study preoperative anemia suggest a blood transfusion can damage the immune system (the system that protects us from disease) which can lead to infection, organ dysfunction (especially of the heart, kidney, brain), prolonged hospital stays, as well as increased supplies, resources and cost in surgical patients. Comprehensive anemia management can reduce or eliminate the need for blood transfusions and provide better outcomes after surgery. Therefore, controlling anemia before surgery is extremely important, and could be a lifesaving measure. This pilot, feasibility study is being done for several reasons. First of all, it will test the the safety and effectiveness of using a short-course of two medications, erythropoietin (EPO) and Feraheme (iron given intravenously [IV]), to increase hemoglobin levels in order to improve preoperative anemia, reduce transfusions and lower postoperative complications in anemic patients undergoing heart surgery. Secondly, findings will be used to design a large randomized controlled trial (RCT). The RCT will establish a protocol to actively manage anemia before surgery, thus reducing transfusions during surgery and improving recovery afterwards. It will also help identify valuable information regarding what needs to be done for timely completion of the planned RCT. EPO is a medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) used to treat anemia in patients with certain conditions in order to reduce blood transfusions. And although approved for use during surgery, it has not been FDA approved for use in cardiac (heart) or vascular (blood vessels, including veins and arteries) surgery. Common side effects include nausea, vomiting, itching, headache, injection site pain, chills, deep vein thrombosis (blood clot), cough, and changes in blood pressure (BP). Feraheme is an iron replacement product approved for the treatment of low iron anemia in adult patients. It may cause serious allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis (severe, whole body allergic reaction), as well as low BP and excessive iron storage. Patients meeting all eligibility requirements that consent to participate will be randomized into the study. Randomization is being placed by chance (like a flip of a coin) into one of two study groups, the treatment group or the control group. There is an equal chance of being placed into either group, which will be done by a computer. 1. The Treatment Group will receive a 300 unit (U) per kilogram (kg) injection of EPO and a 510 milligram (mg) IV infusion of Feraheme 7-28 days before the day of surgery. And again 1-7 days before the day of surgery, a second dose of both of these medications will be given. The third dose, of EPO only, will be administered 2 days after surgery. Before initiating a dose or giving a subsequent dose, laboratory parameters will be measured to assess the hemoglobin level and response to the medication. If blood values increase too rapidly or are too high, the meds will not be started or, if already dosed, they will not be given again. 2. The Control Group will receive no preoperative intervention for anemia unless lab results show iron deficiency anemia. The control group will be screened for the presence of iron deficiency anemia by evaluating blood laboratory values drawn during the baseline or preoperative visit. If lab results indicate iron deficiency anemia, over-the-counter oral iron will be recommended, to take until the day of surgery. In doing so, patients may benefit by potentially reducing the need for blood transfusions. Data will be collected from all participants from the preoperative visits throughout the admission, including lab results, medications, vital signs, information about the procedure, transfusions, and any problems or adverse events.
>Trial Type >Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

All Clinical Trials for FERAHEME

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00103038 Ferumoxytol in Improving MR Imaging in Patients With High-Grade Brain Tumors or Cerebral Metastases Active, not recruiting National Cancer Institute (NCI) N/A 2004-02-01 This clinical trial studies magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a contrast imaging agent ferumoxytol (ferumoxytol non-stoichiometric magnetite) in improving viewing tumors in patients with high-grade brain tumors or cancer that has spread to the brain. Diagnostic procedures, such as MRI, may help find and diagnose brain tumors and find out how far the disease has spread. The contrast imaging agent ferumoxytol non-stoichiometric magnetite consists of small iron particles taken by the blood stream to the brain and to the area of the tumor. It may help visualize the blood flow going through the tumor better than the standard substance gadolinium-based contrast agent.
NCT00103038 Ferumoxytol in Improving MR Imaging in Patients With High-Grade Brain Tumors or Cerebral Metastases Active, not recruiting OHSU Knight Cancer Institute N/A 2004-02-01 This clinical trial studies magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a contrast imaging agent ferumoxytol (ferumoxytol non-stoichiometric magnetite) in improving viewing tumors in patients with high-grade brain tumors or cancer that has spread to the brain. Diagnostic procedures, such as MRI, may help find and diagnose brain tumors and find out how far the disease has spread. The contrast imaging agent ferumoxytol non-stoichiometric magnetite consists of small iron particles taken by the blood stream to the brain and to the area of the tumor. It may help visualize the blood flow going through the tumor better than the standard substance gadolinium-based contrast agent.
NCT00659126 Ferumoxytol- and Gadolinium-Labeled MRI in Measuring Tumors Before or After Treatment in Patients With Primary or Metastatic Brain Tumors Recruiting National Cancer Institute (NCI) Phase 2 2006-11-01 This phase II trial studies how well magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using contrast imaging agent ferumoxytol works in comparison to standard imaging agent gadolinium in measuring tumors in patients undergoing treatment for brain tumors or other tumors that have spread to the brain. Diagnostic procedures, such as MRI, may help find and diagnose disease and find out how far the disease has spread. MRI scans use radio waves and a powerful magnet linked to a computer to create detailed pictures of areas inside the body. The contrast imaging agent ferumoxytol consists of small iron particles taken by the blood stream to the brain and to the area of the tumor. It is highly visible on the MRI, and may help visualize the blood flow going through the tumor better than gadolinium can. Using a more sensitive and faster 7 Tesla (7T) magnet MRI in conjunction with a contrast imaging agent may provide a better way to measure tumors than the 3 Tesla (3T) magnet MRI in patients with brain tumors.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for FERAHEME

Condition Name

Condition Name for FERAHEME
Intervention Trials
Iron Deficiency Anemia 8
Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain 3
Anemia 3
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for FERAHEME
Intervention Trials
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency 14
Anemia 13
Deficiency Diseases 11
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Clinical Trial Locations for FERAHEME

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for FERAHEME
Location Trials
United States 44
Canada 2
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for FERAHEME
Location Trials
Massachusetts 12
Oregon 11
California 5
Maryland 3
Pennsylvania 3
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Clinical Trial Progress for FERAHEME

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for FERAHEME
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 9
Phase 3 8
Phase 2 9
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for FERAHEME
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Recruiting 13
Completed 9
Not yet recruiting 8
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for FERAHEME

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for FERAHEME
Sponsor Trials
National Cancer Institute (NCI) 16
AMAG Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 14
OHSU Knight Cancer Institute 10
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for FERAHEME
Sponsor Trials
Other 37
NIH 19
Industry 16
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Serving leading biopharmaceutical companies globally:

Moodys
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Medtronic
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AstraZeneca
McKinsey

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