➤ Get the DrugPatentWatch Daily Briefing

Get Daily Updates on Generic Entry, Litigation, Biosimilars, and more …

Serving leading biopharmaceutical companies globally:

Moodys
McKesson
McKinsey
AstraZeneca
Johnson and Johnson
Colorcon

Last Updated: May 29, 2020

DrugPatentWatch Database Preview

CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR DOXORUBICIN HYDROCHLORIDE

» See Plans and Pricing

« Back to Dashboard

505(b)(2) Clinical Trials for Doxorubicin Hydrochloride

This table shows clinical trials for potential 505(b)(2) applications. See the next table for all clinical trials
Trial Type Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
New Combination NCT00135187 Study of Combination Therapy With VELCADE, Doxil, and Dexamethasone (VDd) in Multiple Myeloma Completed University of Michigan Cancer Center N/A 2004-07-01 Patients are being asked to take part in this research study because they have multiple myeloma which has relapsed after (come back), or is refractory to (unaffected by), initial therapy. For patients who have relapsed or are refractory to therapy, there is no agreed upon standard treatment. Treatment options include chemotherapy and, for some patients, bone marrow transplants. None of the available treatments are curative and investigators are continually looking for more effective treatments. This study involves treatment with a new combination of standard drugs: VELCADE, Doxil, and Dexamethasone. Preliminary results from a study using a combination of VELCADE with Doxil showed high response rates (disease reduction). Two other studies showed that an addition of Dexamethasone to VELCADE in patients not responding to VELCADE alone improved response rate. The proposed combination of all three drugs may improve efficacy and response. VELCADE is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in multiple myeloma. Doxil is not approved for use in multiple myeloma but is an approved drug for use in patients with some other cancers. Several published clinical trials provide evidence that Doxil is an active agent in multiple myeloma and it is used in treatment combinations for multiple myeloma in general practice. Dexamethasone is approved for use in multiple myeloma. The combination of all three drugs is experimental (not FDA approved). The goals of this study are to determine if this new combination therapy with VELCADE, Doxil and Dexamethasone is an effective treatment, and also to determine the side effects that occur when this combination treatment is given.
New Formulation NCT01337505 Safety and Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) Study of INNO-206 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors Completed CytRx Phase 1 2011-04-01 This is a phase 1b open-label study evaluating the preliminary safety and maximum tolerated dose of a new formulation of INNO-206 administered at doses of 230 mg/m2, 350 mg/m2 and 450 mg/m2 (165, 260, 325 mg/m2 doxorubicin equivalents, respectively) through intravenous infusion on Day 1 every 21 days for up to 6 cycles.
New Dosage NCT01760226 Dose Adjusted EPOCH-R, to Treat Mature B Cell Malignancies Recruiting National Cancer Institute (NCI) N/A 2013-01-01 The subject is invited to take part in this research study because s/he has been diagnosed with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), Primary Mediastinal B-cell Lymphoma (PMBCL), or Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD). In an attempt to improve cure rates while reducing harmful effects from drugs, oncologists are developing new treatment protocols. One such protocol, entitled dose-adjusted EPOCH-R, utilizes two major new strategies. First, the treatment approach utilizes continuous infusion of chemotherapy over four days, instead of being administered over minutes or hours. Secondly, the doses of some medications involved are increased or decreased based on how the drugs affect the subject's ability to produce blood cells, which is used as a measure of how rapidly the body is processing drugs. Using this approach in adults, researchers have shown improved cure rates in these cancers. Additionally, the harmful effects experienced by patients has been mild, with mucositis, severe infections, and tumor lysis syndrome occurring rarely. However, this new dosing method has never been used in children, and the effectiveness and side effects of this new method are unknown in children. The purpose of this study is to look at the safety of dose-adjusted EPOCH-R in the treatment of children with mature B-cell cancers, and to see if we can maintain cure rates (as has been shown in adults). This study represents the first trial of dose-adjusted EPOCH-R in children.
New Dosage NCT01760226 Dose Adjusted EPOCH-R, to Treat Mature B Cell Malignancies Recruiting Texas Children's Hospital N/A 2013-01-01 The subject is invited to take part in this research study because s/he has been diagnosed with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), Primary Mediastinal B-cell Lymphoma (PMBCL), or Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD). In an attempt to improve cure rates while reducing harmful effects from drugs, oncologists are developing new treatment protocols. One such protocol, entitled dose-adjusted EPOCH-R, utilizes two major new strategies. First, the treatment approach utilizes continuous infusion of chemotherapy over four days, instead of being administered over minutes or hours. Secondly, the doses of some medications involved are increased or decreased based on how the drugs affect the subject's ability to produce blood cells, which is used as a measure of how rapidly the body is processing drugs. Using this approach in adults, researchers have shown improved cure rates in these cancers. Additionally, the harmful effects experienced by patients has been mild, with mucositis, severe infections, and tumor lysis syndrome occurring rarely. However, this new dosing method has never been used in children, and the effectiveness and side effects of this new method are unknown in children. The purpose of this study is to look at the safety of dose-adjusted EPOCH-R in the treatment of children with mature B-cell cancers, and to see if we can maintain cure rates (as has been shown in adults). This study represents the first trial of dose-adjusted EPOCH-R in children.
New Dosage NCT01760226 Dose Adjusted EPOCH-R, to Treat Mature B Cell Malignancies Recruiting Baylor College of Medicine N/A 2013-01-01 The subject is invited to take part in this research study because s/he has been diagnosed with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), Primary Mediastinal B-cell Lymphoma (PMBCL), or Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD). In an attempt to improve cure rates while reducing harmful effects from drugs, oncologists are developing new treatment protocols. One such protocol, entitled dose-adjusted EPOCH-R, utilizes two major new strategies. First, the treatment approach utilizes continuous infusion of chemotherapy over four days, instead of being administered over minutes or hours. Secondly, the doses of some medications involved are increased or decreased based on how the drugs affect the subject's ability to produce blood cells, which is used as a measure of how rapidly the body is processing drugs. Using this approach in adults, researchers have shown improved cure rates in these cancers. Additionally, the harmful effects experienced by patients has been mild, with mucositis, severe infections, and tumor lysis syndrome occurring rarely. However, this new dosing method has never been used in children, and the effectiveness and side effects of this new method are unknown in children. The purpose of this study is to look at the safety of dose-adjusted EPOCH-R in the treatment of children with mature B-cell cancers, and to see if we can maintain cure rates (as has been shown in adults). This study represents the first trial of dose-adjusted EPOCH-R in children.
New Combination NCT02188368 Pomalidomide for Lenalidomide for Failures Recruiting Celgene Corporation Phase 2 2014-08-01 The purpose of this clinical research study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness (good and bad effects) of pomalidomide given as part of a combination therapy that include more than just steroids to treat subjects with relapsed (subjects whose disease came back) or refractory (subjects whose disease did not respond to past treatment) multiple myeloma (MM). Pomalidomide (alone or in combination with dexamethasone) has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of MM patients who have received at least two prior therapies, including lenalidomide and bortezomib, and have demonstrated disease progression on or within 60 days of completion of their last therapy. However, the use of pomalidomide in combination with other drugs used to treat MM, such as chemotherapeutic agents and proteasome inhibitors, is currently being tested and is not approved. Pomalidomide is in the same drug class as thalidomide and lenalidomide. Like lenalidomide, pomalidomide is a drug that alters the immune system and it may also interfere with the development of small blood vessels that help support tumor growth. Therefore, in theory, it may reduce or prevent the growth of cancer cells. The testing done with pomalidomide thus far has shown that it is well-tolerated and effective for subjects with MM both on its own and in combination with dexamethasone. Using another drug class, namely proteasome inhibitors, we have demonstrated that simply replacing a proteasome inhibitor with another in an established anti-myeloma treatment regimen can frequently overcome resistance regardless of the other agents that are part of the anti-myeloma regimen. Importantly, the toxicity profile of the new combinations closely resembled that of the proteasome inhibitor administered as a single agent. Based on this experience, we hypothesize that the replacement of lenalidomide with pomalidomide will yield similar results in a similar relapsed/refractory MM patient population.
New Combination NCT02188368 Pomalidomide for Lenalidomide for Failures Recruiting Oncotherapeutics Phase 2 2014-08-01 The purpose of this clinical research study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness (good and bad effects) of pomalidomide given as part of a combination therapy that include more than just steroids to treat subjects with relapsed (subjects whose disease came back) or refractory (subjects whose disease did not respond to past treatment) multiple myeloma (MM). Pomalidomide (alone or in combination with dexamethasone) has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of MM patients who have received at least two prior therapies, including lenalidomide and bortezomib, and have demonstrated disease progression on or within 60 days of completion of their last therapy. However, the use of pomalidomide in combination with other drugs used to treat MM, such as chemotherapeutic agents and proteasome inhibitors, is currently being tested and is not approved. Pomalidomide is in the same drug class as thalidomide and lenalidomide. Like lenalidomide, pomalidomide is a drug that alters the immune system and it may also interfere with the development of small blood vessels that help support tumor growth. Therefore, in theory, it may reduce or prevent the growth of cancer cells. The testing done with pomalidomide thus far has shown that it is well-tolerated and effective for subjects with MM both on its own and in combination with dexamethasone. Using another drug class, namely proteasome inhibitors, we have demonstrated that simply replacing a proteasome inhibitor with another in an established anti-myeloma treatment regimen can frequently overcome resistance regardless of the other agents that are part of the anti-myeloma regimen. Importantly, the toxicity profile of the new combinations closely resembled that of the proteasome inhibitor administered as a single agent. Based on this experience, we hypothesize that the replacement of lenalidomide with pomalidomide will yield similar results in a similar relapsed/refractory MM patient population.
>Trial Type >Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

All Clinical Trials for Doxorubicin Hydrochloride

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00000626 Phase II Study of Filgrastim (G-CSF) Plus ABVD in the Treatment of HIV-Associated Hodgkin's Disease Completed Amgen Phase 2 1969-12-31 Primary: To assess the toxicity of chemotherapy with ABVD (doxorubicin / bleomycin / vinblastine / dacarbazine) when given with filgrastim ( granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; G-CSF ) in patients with underlying HIV infection and Hodgkin's disease; to observe the efficacy of ABVD and G-CSF in reducing tumor burden in HIV-infected patients with Hodgkin's disease. Secondary: To determine the durability of tumor response to ABVD plus G-CSF over the 2-year study period; to observe the incidence of bacterial and opportunistic infections in HIV-infected patients with Hodgkin's disease receiving this regimen; to document quality of life of patients receiving this regimen. Addition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor may prevent neutropenia caused by chemotherapy, allowing more timely administration of chemotherapy and improved response.
NCT00000626 Phase II Study of Filgrastim (G-CSF) Plus ABVD in the Treatment of HIV-Associated Hodgkin's Disease Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 2 1969-12-31 Primary: To assess the toxicity of chemotherapy with ABVD (doxorubicin / bleomycin / vinblastine / dacarbazine) when given with filgrastim ( granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; G-CSF ) in patients with underlying HIV infection and Hodgkin's disease; to observe the efficacy of ABVD and G-CSF in reducing tumor burden in HIV-infected patients with Hodgkin's disease. Secondary: To determine the durability of tumor response to ABVD plus G-CSF over the 2-year study period; to observe the incidence of bacterial and opportunistic infections in HIV-infected patients with Hodgkin's disease receiving this regimen; to document quality of life of patients receiving this regimen. Addition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor may prevent neutropenia caused by chemotherapy, allowing more timely administration of chemotherapy and improved response.
NCT00000658 A Phase III Randomized Trial of Low-Dose Versus Standard-Dose mBACOD Chemotherapy With rGM-CSF for Treatment of AIDS-Associated Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Completed Schering-Plough Phase 3 1969-12-31 To determine the impact of dose intensity on tumor response and survival in patients with HIV-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). HIV-infected patients are at increased risk for developing intermediate and high-grade NHL. While combination chemotherapy for aggressive B-cell NHL in the absence of immunodeficiency is highly effective, the outcome of therapy for patients with AIDS-associated NHL has been disappointing. Treatment is frequently complicated by the occurrence of multiple opportunistic infections, as well as the presence of poor bone marrow reserve, making the administration of standard doses of chemotherapy difficult. A recent study was completed using a low-dose modification of the standard mBACOD (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, bleomycin, dexamethasone, methotrexate ) treatment. A 46 percent response rate was observed in patients treated with this combination of chemotherapeutic agents, with a number of durable remissions and reduced toxicity when compared to previous experience with more standard treatments. A subsequent study showed similar effectiveness using a lower dose of methotrexate administered on day 15. It is hoped that the use of sargramostim (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor; GM-CSF) will improve bone marrow function and allow for administration of a higher dose of chemotherapy.
NCT00000658 A Phase III Randomized Trial of Low-Dose Versus Standard-Dose mBACOD Chemotherapy With rGM-CSF for Treatment of AIDS-Associated Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 3 1969-12-31 To determine the impact of dose intensity on tumor response and survival in patients with HIV-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). HIV-infected patients are at increased risk for developing intermediate and high-grade NHL. While combination chemotherapy for aggressive B-cell NHL in the absence of immunodeficiency is highly effective, the outcome of therapy for patients with AIDS-associated NHL has been disappointing. Treatment is frequently complicated by the occurrence of multiple opportunistic infections, as well as the presence of poor bone marrow reserve, making the administration of standard doses of chemotherapy difficult. A recent study was completed using a low-dose modification of the standard mBACOD (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, bleomycin, dexamethasone, methotrexate ) treatment. A 46 percent response rate was observed in patients treated with this combination of chemotherapeutic agents, with a number of durable remissions and reduced toxicity when compared to previous experience with more standard treatments. A subsequent study showed similar effectiveness using a lower dose of methotrexate administered on day 15. It is hoped that the use of sargramostim (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor; GM-CSF) will improve bone marrow function and allow for administration of a higher dose of chemotherapy.
NCT00000681 A Phase I Study of the Combination of Recombinant GM-CSF, AZT, and Chemotherapy (ABV) (Adriamycin, Bleomycin, Vincristine) in AIDS and Kaposi's Sarcoma Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 1 1969-12-31 To determine the safety as well as the most effective dose of sargramostim (GM-CSF; granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor) that will prevent the side effects caused by the combined use of zidovudine (AZT) and various doses of cancer-fighting drugs (doxorubicin, bleomycin, and vincristine) in AIDS patients with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Patients included in this study have KS, which is a type of cancer that occurs in nearly 20 percent of patients with AIDS. AIDS patients with extensive KS require treatment with effective cytotoxic (anti-cancer) agents to reduce the tumor size and with antiretroviral agents such as AZT to prevent or ameliorate the development of opportunistic infections. Due to the significant toxic effect of both cytotoxic and antiviral agents on the bone marrow where new blood cells are generated, the combination of these agents is expected to result in complications such as granulocytopenia (very low granulocyte counts). Hematopoietic growth factors such as GM-CSF may reduce the severity and duration of marrow suppression. This may improve survival. Clinical trials of GM-CSF in HIV infected individuals with or without granulocytopenia have shown that the progenitor cells (early blood cells) are responsive to GM-CSF.
NCT00000689 Phase I Trial of mBACOD and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) in AIDS-Associated Large Cell, Immunoblastic, and Small Non-cleaved Lymphoma Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 1 1969-12-31 To determine the toxicity and effectiveness of adding sargramostim (recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor; GM-CSF) to a standard chemotherapy drug combination (methotrexate, bleomycin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and dexamethasone) known as mBACOD in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in patients who are infected with HIV. Treatment of patients with AIDS-associated lymphoma is achieving inferior results when compared with outcomes for non-AIDS patients. Treatment with mBACOD has been promising, but the toxicity is very high. Patients treated with mBACOD have very low white blood cell counts. GM-CSF has increased the number of white blood cells in animal studies and preliminary human studies. It is hoped that including GM-CSF among the drugs given to lymphoma patients will prevent or lessen the decrease in white blood cells caused by mBACOD.
NCT00000703 Chemotherapy and Azidothymidine, With or Without Radiotherapy, for High Grade Lymphoma in AIDS-Risk Group Members Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) N/A 1969-12-31 To determine the safety and effectiveness of a combination chemotherapy-radiation-zidovudine (AZT) treatment for patients with peripheral lymphoma. Other chemotherapies have been tried in patients with AIDS related lymphomas, but the results have not been satisfactory. This study will show whether the combination of chemotherapy, radiation, and AZT is more effective and less toxic than previously used treatments.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for Doxorubicin Hydrochloride

Condition Name

Condition Name for Doxorubicin Hydrochloride
Intervention Trials
Breast Cancer 282
Lymphoma 186
Sarcoma 86
Ovarian Cancer 80
[disabled in preview] 0
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Export unavailable in trial.
Subscribe for complete access.

Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Doxorubicin Hydrochloride
Intervention Trials
Lymphoma 479
Breast Neoplasms 405
Sarcoma 184
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin 164
[disabled in preview] 0
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Export unavailable in trial.
Subscribe for complete access.

Clinical Trial Locations for Doxorubicin Hydrochloride

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Doxorubicin Hydrochloride
Location Trials
United States 8,442
Canada 705
Italy 398
Australia 287
United Kingdom 264
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Export unavailable in trial.
Subscribe for complete access.

Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Doxorubicin Hydrochloride
Location Trials
California 383
New York 377
Texas 347
Ohio 277
Illinois 271
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Export unavailable in trial.
Subscribe for complete access.

Clinical Trial Progress for Doxorubicin Hydrochloride

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Doxorubicin Hydrochloride
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 38
Phase 3 401
Phase 2/Phase 3 41
[disabled in preview] 1269
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Export unavailable in trial.
Subscribe for complete access.

Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Doxorubicin Hydrochloride
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 694
Recruiting 371
Active, not recruiting 216
[disabled in preview] 546
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Export unavailable in trial.
Subscribe for complete access.

Clinical Trial Sponsors for Doxorubicin Hydrochloride

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Doxorubicin Hydrochloride
Sponsor Trials
National Cancer Institute (NCI) 497
M.D. Anderson Cancer Center 79
Children's Oncology Group 67
[disabled in preview] 148
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Export unavailable in trial.
Subscribe for complete access.

Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Doxorubicin Hydrochloride
Sponsor Trials
Other 1988
Industry 734
NIH 523
[disabled in preview] 7
This preview shows a limited data set
Subscribe for full access, or try a Trial

Export unavailable in trial.
Subscribe for complete access.

Make Better Decisions: Try a trial or see plans & pricing

Serving leading biopharmaceutical companies globally:

McKesson
Moodys
Dow
Colorcon
Harvard Business School
Johnson and Johnson

Drugs may be covered by multiple patents or regulatory protections. All trademarks and applicant names are the property of their respective owners or licensors. Although great care is taken in the proper and correct provision of this service, thinkBiotech LLC does not accept any responsibility for possible consequences of errors or omissions in the provided data. The data presented herein is for information purposes only. There is no warranty that the data contained herein is error free. thinkBiotech performs no independent verification of facts as provided by public sources nor are attempts made to provide legal or investing advice. Any reliance on data provided herein is done solely at the discretion of the user. Users of this service are advised to seek professional advice and independent confirmation before considering acting on any of the provided information. thinkBiotech LLC reserves the right to amend, extend or withdraw any part or all of the offered service without notice.