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Generated: September 21, 2019

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR CORLANOR

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Clinical Trials for CORLANOR

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary
NCT02827500 Predischarge Initiation of Ivabradine in the Management of Heart Failure (PRIME-HF) Recruiting Amgen Phase 4 The PRIME-HF study is a multi-center, patient-level, randomized, open-label study of approximately 450 patients with reduced (left ventricular ejection fraction) LVEF of <35% and heart-rate >70 beats per minute (bpm) who are being discharged from the hospital following stabilization from acute heart failure (HF) and will be randomized to a treatment strategy of predischarge initiation of ivabradine or usual care. All participants should have a follow-up visit within 7-14 days of hospital discharge. Heart rate and systolic blood pressure will be assessed at this clinical visit. For participants randomized to predischarge initiation of ivabradine and on ivabradine 5mg BID, the heart rate may be used to adjust the dose the dose to 2.5mg BID or 7.5mg BID. For participants randomized to usual care, ivabradine may be initiated at the provider's discretion. All participants will have a second follow-up study visit 6 weeks (42 +/- 14 days) post-discharge. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure and quality of life (KCCQ and PGA) will be assessed. For participants already taking ivabradine in either treatment group, the heart rate may again be used to adjust the dose of ivabradine. For participants not yet receiving ivabradine, it may be initiated at the provider's discretion. All participants will receive a 90 (+/-7) day post-discharge phone call by site to assess for event status and tolerability of ivabradine. All participants will have a final study visit at 180 (+/-14) days post-discharge. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure and quality of life (Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire and Patient Global Assessment) will be assessed. The attending physician may initiate ivabradine per usual care clinical practice. The primary hypothesis of the PRIME-HF study is that, compared with usual care, a treatment strategy of initiation of ivabradine prior to discharge for a hospitalization for acute HF will be associated with a greater proportion of participants using ivabradine at 180 days. Secondary objectives are to assess the impact of predischarge initiation of ivabradine on:Heart Rate (Percent change in heart rate from baseline to 180 days and Median heart rate at 180 days) and Patient-Centered Outcomes (Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) and Patient Global Assessment (PGA)). Tertiary objectives will be to explore the impact of predischarge initiation of ivabradine on other assessments of evidence-based implementation of ivabradine and beta-blockers at 180 days. Evaluations will incorporate data based on whether or not indication status was retained and whether or not an ivabradine prescription was provided. Tolerability of ivabradine and adverse events during study follow-up.
NCT02827500 Predischarge Initiation of Ivabradine in the Management of Heart Failure (PRIME-HF) Recruiting Duke University Phase 4 The PRIME-HF study is a multi-center, patient-level, randomized, open-label study of approximately 450 patients with reduced (left ventricular ejection fraction) LVEF of <35% and heart-rate >70 beats per minute (bpm) who are being discharged from the hospital following stabilization from acute heart failure (HF) and will be randomized to a treatment strategy of predischarge initiation of ivabradine or usual care. All participants should have a follow-up visit within 7-14 days of hospital discharge. Heart rate and systolic blood pressure will be assessed at this clinical visit. For participants randomized to predischarge initiation of ivabradine and on ivabradine 5mg BID, the heart rate may be used to adjust the dose the dose to 2.5mg BID or 7.5mg BID. For participants randomized to usual care, ivabradine may be initiated at the provider's discretion. All participants will have a second follow-up study visit 6 weeks (42 +/- 14 days) post-discharge. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure and quality of life (KCCQ and PGA) will be assessed. For participants already taking ivabradine in either treatment group, the heart rate may again be used to adjust the dose of ivabradine. For participants not yet receiving ivabradine, it may be initiated at the provider's discretion. All participants will receive a 90 (+/-7) day post-discharge phone call by site to assess for event status and tolerability of ivabradine. All participants will have a final study visit at 180 (+/-14) days post-discharge. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure and quality of life (Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire and Patient Global Assessment) will be assessed. The attending physician may initiate ivabradine per usual care clinical practice. The primary hypothesis of the PRIME-HF study is that, compared with usual care, a treatment strategy of initiation of ivabradine prior to discharge for a hospitalization for acute HF will be associated with a greater proportion of participants using ivabradine at 180 days. Secondary objectives are to assess the impact of predischarge initiation of ivabradine on:Heart Rate (Percent change in heart rate from baseline to 180 days and Median heart rate at 180 days) and Patient-Centered Outcomes (Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) and Patient Global Assessment (PGA)). Tertiary objectives will be to explore the impact of predischarge initiation of ivabradine on other assessments of evidence-based implementation of ivabradine and beta-blockers at 180 days. Evaluations will incorporate data based on whether or not indication status was retained and whether or not an ivabradine prescription was provided. Tolerability of ivabradine and adverse events during study follow-up.
NCT02973594 Pulse Reduction On Beta-blocker and Ivabradine Therapy Recruiting American Heart Association Phase 4 Heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF) is the most common form of chronic heart failure in subjects ≤ 75 years of age. Beta-blocker therapy greatly reduces mortality and improves ventricular function in HFrEF patients, but 30-40% of patients do not show improvement in ventricular function with beta blockade. An extensive gene signaling network downstream from the beta1-adrenergic receptor, the primary target of beta-blocker therapy is likely important for development and progression HFrEF. Pathologic changes in this gene signaling network are only reversed towards normal levels when ventricular function improves. One potential mechanism for failure to improve ventricular function in HFrEF patients unresponsive to beta blocker therapy is a lack of heart rate reduction. Ivabradine is an FDA-approved medication believed to have therapeutic benefit in HFrEF patients through reduction in heart rate independent of beta-blockade. Ivabradine has been shown to reduce the risk of hospitalization for worsening HF in patients with stable, symptomatic chronic heart failure with reduced EF (≤ 35%)in sinus rhythm with resting heart rate ≥ 70 bpm and who are on maximally tolerated doses of beta blockers or who have a contraindication to beta blockers. Given the high rate of mortality and hospitalization of HFrEF patients even with current therapies, there is a large unmet need for improving HFrEF therapy. The goals of this study are to test the hypothesis that heart rate reduction is an important antecedent for improvement in ventricular function, and to identify components of the beta1-adrenergic receptor gene signaling network responsible for improvement in ventricular function caused by heart rate reduction.
NCT02973594 Pulse Reduction On Beta-blocker and Ivabradine Therapy Recruiting University of Utah Phase 4 Heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF) is the most common form of chronic heart failure in subjects ≤ 75 years of age. Beta-blocker therapy greatly reduces mortality and improves ventricular function in HFrEF patients, but 30-40% of patients do not show improvement in ventricular function with beta blockade. An extensive gene signaling network downstream from the beta1-adrenergic receptor, the primary target of beta-blocker therapy is likely important for development and progression HFrEF. Pathologic changes in this gene signaling network are only reversed towards normal levels when ventricular function improves. One potential mechanism for failure to improve ventricular function in HFrEF patients unresponsive to beta blocker therapy is a lack of heart rate reduction. Ivabradine is an FDA-approved medication believed to have therapeutic benefit in HFrEF patients through reduction in heart rate independent of beta-blockade. Ivabradine has been shown to reduce the risk of hospitalization for worsening HF in patients with stable, symptomatic chronic heart failure with reduced EF (≤ 35%)in sinus rhythm with resting heart rate ≥ 70 bpm and who are on maximally tolerated doses of beta blockers or who have a contraindication to beta blockers. Given the high rate of mortality and hospitalization of HFrEF patients even with current therapies, there is a large unmet need for improving HFrEF therapy. The goals of this study are to test the hypothesis that heart rate reduction is an important antecedent for improvement in ventricular function, and to identify components of the beta1-adrenergic receptor gene signaling network responsible for improvement in ventricular function caused by heart rate reduction.
NCT02973594 Pulse Reduction On Beta-blocker and Ivabradine Therapy Recruiting University of Colorado, Denver Phase 4 Heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF) is the most common form of chronic heart failure in subjects ≤ 75 years of age. Beta-blocker therapy greatly reduces mortality and improves ventricular function in HFrEF patients, but 30-40% of patients do not show improvement in ventricular function with beta blockade. An extensive gene signaling network downstream from the beta1-adrenergic receptor, the primary target of beta-blocker therapy is likely important for development and progression HFrEF. Pathologic changes in this gene signaling network are only reversed towards normal levels when ventricular function improves. One potential mechanism for failure to improve ventricular function in HFrEF patients unresponsive to beta blocker therapy is a lack of heart rate reduction. Ivabradine is an FDA-approved medication believed to have therapeutic benefit in HFrEF patients through reduction in heart rate independent of beta-blockade. Ivabradine has been shown to reduce the risk of hospitalization for worsening HF in patients with stable, symptomatic chronic heart failure with reduced EF (≤ 35%)in sinus rhythm with resting heart rate ≥ 70 bpm and who are on maximally tolerated doses of beta blockers or who have a contraindication to beta blockers. Given the high rate of mortality and hospitalization of HFrEF patients even with current therapies, there is a large unmet need for improving HFrEF therapy. The goals of this study are to test the hypothesis that heart rate reduction is an important antecedent for improvement in ventricular function, and to identify components of the beta1-adrenergic receptor gene signaling network responsible for improvement in ventricular function caused by heart rate reduction.
NCT03168529 Trial Assessing the Effectiveness of Ivabradine Started at Discharge From the Observation Unit Not yet recruiting Amgen Phase 4 Ivabradine (IVA) has been shown to decrease the risk of hospitalizations for worsening Heart Failure and was associated with a trend towards improved mortality in the SHIFT1 trial. SHIFT1 excluded patients within 4 weeks of hospital discharge, so the efficacy and safety of IVA in this setting is less clear. In today's health care environment more and more patients that present to the Emergency Department (ED) for mild Acute Heart Failure (AHF) are being placed into observation unit and subsequently discharged, or discharged outright from the ED. This is not only a growing segment of patients, but also represents an important window of opportunity to intervene with a potentially effective therapy. Moreover, at this point in a patient's experience (being discharged after getting treated for exacerbation of Heart Failure), it's not clear that beta blockers (BB) should yet be increased/started due to the recent state of exacerbation. Standard treatment of worsened heart failure presenting to the ED or urgent care includes diuretics (e. g. furosemide) and vasodilators (e.g. ACE-I, ARB, Hydralazine/Isosorbide or ARNi), but according to usual standard of care, titration of beta blockade is often reserved for outpatient follow up after a period of demonstrated stability (in the ambulatory setting). This is in contradistinction to hospitalized patients, where patients have been observed by the treating team for days, presumably show stability and improvement, and starting low dose BB at the time of hospital discharge has been shown to be safe. As such these ED/Observation discharge patients are often not optimal candidates for intensification of BB at the time of release, and could be considered to be at maximally tolerated BB dose (for at least for 2-4 weeks). This may represent a vulnerable period for these patients; its unknown in the setting of Observation discharge but evidence from hospitalized patients indicates that the highest daily risk of rehospitalization is in the days just after discharge. IVA may be effective post observation unit management (where lower risk Heart Failure (HF) patients are typically placed), to reduce heart rate (without decreasing contractility, such as a BB would) to help reduce the risk of hospitalization or emergency care, but safety and efficacy (in terms of heart rate lowering) in this setting has not been previously explored. Additionally, the SHIFT1 trial lacked African Americans and this unique patient population has not been previously studied with IVA. The investigating sites serve a predominantly African American patient population. Therefore the proposed study represents an important opportunity to gather data on IVA effect in this understudied group of patients.
NCT03168529 Trial Assessing the Effectiveness of Ivabradine Started at Discharge From the Observation Unit Not yet recruiting iRhythm Technologies, Inc. Phase 4 Ivabradine (IVA) has been shown to decrease the risk of hospitalizations for worsening Heart Failure and was associated with a trend towards improved mortality in the SHIFT1 trial. SHIFT1 excluded patients within 4 weeks of hospital discharge, so the efficacy and safety of IVA in this setting is less clear. In today's health care environment more and more patients that present to the Emergency Department (ED) for mild Acute Heart Failure (AHF) are being placed into observation unit and subsequently discharged, or discharged outright from the ED. This is not only a growing segment of patients, but also represents an important window of opportunity to intervene with a potentially effective therapy. Moreover, at this point in a patient's experience (being discharged after getting treated for exacerbation of Heart Failure), it's not clear that beta blockers (BB) should yet be increased/started due to the recent state of exacerbation. Standard treatment of worsened heart failure presenting to the ED or urgent care includes diuretics (e. g. furosemide) and vasodilators (e.g. ACE-I, ARB, Hydralazine/Isosorbide or ARNi), but according to usual standard of care, titration of beta blockade is often reserved for outpatient follow up after a period of demonstrated stability (in the ambulatory setting). This is in contradistinction to hospitalized patients, where patients have been observed by the treating team for days, presumably show stability and improvement, and starting low dose BB at the time of hospital discharge has been shown to be safe. As such these ED/Observation discharge patients are often not optimal candidates for intensification of BB at the time of release, and could be considered to be at maximally tolerated BB dose (for at least for 2-4 weeks). This may represent a vulnerable period for these patients; its unknown in the setting of Observation discharge but evidence from hospitalized patients indicates that the highest daily risk of rehospitalization is in the days just after discharge. IVA may be effective post observation unit management (where lower risk Heart Failure (HF) patients are typically placed), to reduce heart rate (without decreasing contractility, such as a BB would) to help reduce the risk of hospitalization or emergency care, but safety and efficacy (in terms of heart rate lowering) in this setting has not been previously explored. Additionally, the SHIFT1 trial lacked African Americans and this unique patient population has not been previously studied with IVA. The investigating sites serve a predominantly African American patient population. Therefore the proposed study represents an important opportunity to gather data on IVA effect in this understudied group of patients.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Summary

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Clinical Trial Conditions for CORLANOR

Condition Name

Condition Name for CORLANOR
Intervention Trials
Heart Failure 2
Heart Failure (HF) 1
Electrical Remodeling 1
Dilated Cardiomyopathies, Idiopathic 1
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for CORLANOR
Intervention Trials
Heart Failure 4
Cardiomyopathy, Dilated 1
Cardiomyopathies 1
Atrial Remodeling 1
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Clinical Trial Locations for CORLANOR

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for CORLANOR
Location Trials
United States 15
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for CORLANOR
Location Trials
Michigan 3
New York 2
Delaware 1
Utah 1
Colorado 1
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Clinical Trial Progress for CORLANOR

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for CORLANOR
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 4
Phase 3 1
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for CORLANOR
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Recruiting 3
Not yet recruiting 2
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for CORLANOR

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for CORLANOR
Sponsor Trials
Amgen 4
University of Utah 1
American Heart Association 1
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for CORLANOR
Sponsor Trials
Other 5
Industry 5
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