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Generated: December 15, 2018

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR BUPIVACAINE HYDROCHLORIDE; LIDOCAINE HYDROCHLORIDE

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Clinical Trials for Bupivacaine Hydrochloride; Lidocaine Hydrochloride

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary
NCT00008476 Capsaicin to Control Pain Following Third Molar Extraction Completed National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Phase 2 This study will test the effectiveness of the drug capsaicin in controlling pain after third molar (wisdom tooth) extraction. Capsaicin, the ingredient in chili peppers that makes them "hot," belongs to a class of drugs called vanilloids, which have been found to temporarily inactivate pain-sensing nerves. Healthy normal volunteers between 16 and 40 years of age who require third molar (wisdom tooth) extraction may be eligible for this study. Participants will undergo the following procedures in three visits: Visit 1: Patients will have touch (sensory) testing by the following three methods: 1) a warm sensor applied to the gums and the patient will rate when they first feel heat and when the heat feels painful; 2) the bristles of a small paint brush will be gently stroked across the gums, and the patient will say whether it feels painful; 3) a light touch will be applied to the gums with a small needle, and the patient will rate the pain intensity following the touch. After testing, patients will be numbed with a local anesthetic (bupivacaine) and then capsaicin or placebo (an inactive solution) will be injected next to the tooth. The tooth then will be extracted one day later. Visit 2: Patients will return to the clinic after 24 hours to repeat the same type of sensory testing. After testing, patients will be sedated and numbed with a local anesthetic (lidocaine) and given an intravenous injection of either saline or ketorolac (30 mg). After the extraction, pain ratings will be recorded every 20 minutes, for up to 6 hours. During this time, patients will be monitored for numbness, pain, side effects and vital signs (heart rate, blood pressure, respiration, etc.). Those who request pain medicine will receive acetaminophen and codeine. Patients will be required to stay for up to 3 more hours after this and then they will then be discharged with pain medicine. Visit 3: Patients will return to the clinic after another 48 hours to repeat the same sensory testing. Remaining wisdom teeth will be removed "off-study" at least three weeks following the first visit.
NCT00050362 Rofecoxib and Bupivacaine to Prevent Pain After Third Molar (Wisdom Tooth) Extraction Completed National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Phase 2 This study will evaluate the ability of the drugs rofecoxib and bupivacaine to prevent pain following third molar (wisdom tooth) extraction. Rofecoxib is approved to treat pain of arthritis and menstrual cramps. Bupivacaine is a local anesthetic similar to lidocaine, but longer acting. Healthy normal volunteers between 16 and 35 years of age who are in general good health and require extraction of their two lower wisdom teeth may be eligible for this study. Participants will have their two lower wisdom teeth extracted, and a biopsy (removal of a small piece of tissue) will be taken from the inside of the cheek around the area behind one of the extraction sites. Ninety minutes before surgery, patients will take a dose of either rofecoxib, or a placebo (a pill with no active ingredient) by mouth. Just before surgery, they will receive an injection of either lidocaine or bupivacaine to numb the mouth and a sedative called midazolam (Versed® (Registered Trademark)) through an arm vein to cause drowsiness. After surgery, a small piece of tubing will be placed into one of the two extraction sites. Samples will be collected from the tubing to measure chemicals involved in pain and inflammation. Patients will remain in the clinic for up to 4 hours after surgery to monitor pain and drug side effects while the anesthetic wears off. During this time, they will complete pain questionnaires every 20 minutes. (Patients whose pain is unrelieved an hour after surgery may request and receive acetaminophen (Tylenol) and codeine.) The tubing then will be removed and they will be discharged with pain medicines (Tylenol, codeine and the study drug) and forms to record pain ratings. They will be given detailed instructions on how and when to take the medicines and how to record information in the pain diary. Patients will return to the clinic 48 hours after surgery with the pain diary and pain relievers. At this visit, another biopsy will be taken under local anesthetic (lidocaine).
NCT00458003 Phenylephrine in Spinal Anesthesia in Preeclamptic Patients Recruiting Northwestern University N/A Hypotension remains a common clinical problem after induction of spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery. Maternal hypotension has been associated with considerable morbidity (maternal nausea and vomiting and fetal/neonatal acidemia). Traditionally, ephedrine has been the vasopressor of choice because of concerns about phenylephrine's potential adverse effect on uterine blood flow. This practice was based on animal studies which showed that ephedrine maintained cardiac output and uterine blood flow, while direct acting vasoconstrictors, e.g., phenylephrine, decreased uteroplacental perfusion. However, several recent studies have demonstrated that phenylephrine has similar efficacy to ephedrine for preventing and treating hypotension and may be associated with a lower incidence of fetal acidosis. All of these studies have been performed in healthy patients undergoing elective cesarean delivery. Preeclampsia complicates 5-6% of all pregnancies and is a significant contributor to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Many preeclamptic patients require cesarean delivery of the infant. These patients often have uteroplacental insufficiency. Given the potential for significant hypotension after spinal anesthesia and its effect on an already compromised fetus, prevention of (relative) hypotension in preeclamptic patients is important. Spinal anesthesia in preeclamptic patients has been shown to have no adverse neonatal outcomes as compared to epidural anesthesia when hypotension is treated adequately. Due to problems related to management of the difficult airway and coagulopathy, both of which are more common in preeclamptic women, spinal anesthesia may be the preferred regional anesthesia technique. Recent studies have demonstrated that preeclamptic patients may experience less hypotension after spinal anesthesia than their healthy counterparts. To our knowledge, phenylephrine for the treatment of spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension has not been studied in women with preeclampsia. The aim of our study is to compare intravenous infusion regimens of phenylephrine versus ephedrine for the treatment of spinal anesthesia induced hypotension in preeclamptic patients undergoing cesarean delivery. The primary outcome variable is umbilical artery pH.
NCT00484159 Efficacy and Cost: Benefit Ratio of 0, 1, and 2 Medial Branch Blocks for Lumbar Facet Joint Radiofrequency Denervation Completed Johns Hopkins University N/A Lumbar zygapophysial (facet) joint pain is a common cause of low back pain. Radiofrequency (RF) denervation is an effective and low risk treatment of chronic low back pain of suspected facet joint etiology. Blocks of the medial branches innervating the joints are commonly used to localize the pain and make the diagnosis of facet joint pain. There is currently no standard number of diagnostic blocks: zero, one, and two blocks have all been utilized. Considering the high false positive and false negative rates of these blocks, the cost: benefit ratio has been questioned. No study to date has examined the practice of diagnostic medial branch blocks before RF denervation. The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal number of blocks before radiofrequency denervation. Three groups of patients will be studied. In group I, patients will undergo RF denervation based on history and physical exam alone. In group II, patients will undergo RF denervation based on a positive response to a single diagnostic block with local anesthetic. In group III, patients will undergo RF treatment only after a positive screening block and a positive confirmatory block.
NCT00487084 Effect of Timing on Efficacy of Morphine Analgesia After 2-chloroprocaine Anesthesia Completed Northwestern University N/A Epidural chloroprocaine is often used in obstetrical anesthesia because of its fast onset and short duration. These properties make it an ideal drug to use for epidural anesthesia in patients undergoing postpartum tubal ligation. When epidural morphine is given after chloroprocaine, there is a decreased efficacy of analgesia as compared to lidocaine (1). Several studies have hypothesized a specific opioid receptor mediated antagonism of chloroprocaine (2,3). Karambelkar raised the question whether this decreased efficacy is due to a disparity between the time the chloroprocaine anesthesia resolves and the onset of epidural morphine analgesia, resulting in a time window of pain (2). The duration of action of epidural 2-CP anesthesia is 30-45 minutes and the onset of epidural morphine analgesia is 60-70 minutes, therefore the regression of sensory blockade before the onset of the morphine analgesia could result in a window of pain (2). Hess and colleagues studied epidural morphine analgesia and women who had a Cesarean delivery under spinal bupivacaine anesthesia (3). Subjects were randomized to receive epidural 2-CP and morphine or epidural saline and morphine. There was no difference in postoperative analgesia between the two groups (3 and personal communication, Dr. Philip Hess). A literature search cross referencing epidural chloroprocaine, using Pub Med, did not produce any articles comparing epidural morphine given before the procedure (in an attempt to time the onset of analgesia with the resolution of chloroprocaine anesthesia) to the standard administration time after the procedure.
NCT00508976 Clinical Proposal for the Comparison of Intraperitoneal Anesthetic to Injected Local Anesthetic Completed Pinnacle Health System Phase 2 The purpose of this study is to determine if pre-incisional lidocaine injection, instilled liquid bupivacaine, intra-abdominal aerosolized bupivacaine, or post-operative bupivacaine injection is superior in post-operative pain control in laparoscopic bariatric surgical patients.
Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary

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Clinical Trial Conditions for Bupivacaine Hydrochloride; Lidocaine Hydrochloride

Condition Name

Condition Name for Bupivacaine Hydrochloride; Lidocaine Hydrochloride
Intervention Trials
Pain, Postoperative 14
Pain 11
Postoperative Pain 9
Anesthesia, Local 6
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for Bupivacaine Hydrochloride; Lidocaine Hydrochloride
Intervention Trials
Pain, Postoperative 29
Hypotension 6
Acute Pain 5
Osteoarthritis 4
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Clinical Trial Locations for Bupivacaine Hydrochloride; Lidocaine Hydrochloride

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for Bupivacaine Hydrochloride; Lidocaine Hydrochloride
Location Trials
United States 61
Canada 9
Egypt 8
Turkey 6
Belgium 4
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for Bupivacaine Hydrochloride; Lidocaine Hydrochloride
Location Trials
Maryland 6
California 6
Texas 5
Ohio 5
New York 4
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Clinical Trial Progress for Bupivacaine Hydrochloride; Lidocaine Hydrochloride

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for Bupivacaine Hydrochloride; Lidocaine Hydrochloride
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 45
Phase 3 9
Phase 2/Phase 3 4
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for Bupivacaine Hydrochloride; Lidocaine Hydrochloride
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 54
Recruiting 27
Not yet recruiting 24
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for Bupivacaine Hydrochloride; Lidocaine Hydrochloride

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for Bupivacaine Hydrochloride; Lidocaine Hydrochloride
Sponsor Trials
The Cleveland Clinic 5
Assiut University 4
Makassed General Hospital 4
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for Bupivacaine Hydrochloride; Lidocaine Hydrochloride
Sponsor Trials
Other 164
U.S. Fed 8
NIH 3
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Serving hundreds of leading biopharmaceutical companies globally:

Chinese Patent Office
Cerilliant
Teva
Federal Trade Commission
Accenture
Harvard Business School
Cipla
Johnson and Johnson
Julphar

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