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Last Updated: June 23, 2021

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR SMALLPOX (VACCINIA) VACCINE, LIVE

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All Clinical Trials for smallpox (vaccinia) vaccine, live

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00005916 PSA-Based Vaccine and Radiotherapy to Treat Localized Prostate Cancer Completed National Cancer Institute (NCI) Phase 2 2000-06-01 This study will test the ability of an experimental vaccine to increase the number of tumor-fighting immune cells (lymphocytes) in patients with localized prostate cancer and prevent the disease from recurring following radiation therapy. The vaccine is intended to stimulate lymphocytes to target and attack cells containing a protein called prostate specific antigen, or PSA. It is composed of the following parts: - rV-PSA: Vaccinia virus plus human DNA that produces PSA (prostate specific antigen) - rV-B7.1: Vaccinia virus plus human DNA that produces B7.1 (a protein that helps guide immune cells to their targets) - rF-PSA: Fowlpox virus plus human DNA that produces PSA - GM-CSF: Drug that boosts the immune system. - IL-2: Drug that boosts the immune system. Patients 18 years of age and older with prostate cancer confined to the prostate who have received a smallpox vaccine sometime in the past and who do not have a history of allergy to eggs may be eligible for this study. Candidates are screened with a complete medical history and physical examination, blood tests, and skin tests (similar to those for allergies or tuberculosis) to assess immune function. Participants are randomly assigned to receive one of the following three treatments: Group 1 - standard radiation therapy plus the experimental vaccine; Group 2 - standard radiation therapy without the vaccine; Group 3 - standard radiation therapy with the vaccine, but with a different dose of IL-2 from Group 1. Patients in the vaccine groups receive injections in the arm or thigh in 28-day treatment cycles, as follows: - GM-CSF: Days 1 through 4 of the first week - IL-2 5: for Group 1, 5 days in the second week of each cycle; for Group 3, 14 days beginning in the second week of each cycle - rV-PSA and rV-B7.1: Day 2 of the first cycle only - rF-PSA (booster shots): Every 28 days, beginning day 2 of the second cycle (i.e., days 30, 58, 86, etc.) Treatment continues for eight cycles unless serious side effects develop, PSA levels rise significantly, or the doctors feel there is no reason to continue therapy. All patients undergo radiation therapy and possibly hormone therapy, if indicated. Blood samples are drawn once a week for the first month and then once every 4 weeks to monitor safety. After treatment ends, patients are followed with examinations and blood tests every 3 months for the first 2 years and then every 6 months until the doctors determine follow-up is no longer needed or the cancer returns. All patients have HLA tissue typing at the beginning of the study. Those who are type HLA-A2 are asked to have additional procedures for studying the immune response that can be done only with this tissue type. This involves collecting blood samples before treatment begins, every 4 weeks during treatment, once after cycle 2, and once 4 months after the eighth vaccine. They also undergo four leukapheresis procedures for collecting white blood cells. For leukapheresis, blood is collected through a needle in an arm vein, similar to donating a unit of blood. The blood flows through a machine that separates it into its components. The white cells are removed, and the red cells, platelets and plasma are returned to the body, either through the same needle or through a needle in the other arm.
NCT00006630 Vaccinia Immune Globulin in Treating or Preventing Vaccinal Infection Withdrawn National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 1 1969-12-31 The purpose of this study is to follow responses to treatment with vaccinia immune globulin (VIG) for safety and clinical benefit [during HIV vaccine research]. VIG is purified from human blood and used to treat serious infections of the vaccinia (smallpox vaccine) virus or similar viruses. It is the only treatment available for those viruses. The only available supply of VIG has developed a discoloration over time and therefore is considered an investigational new drug by the FDA. This study will allow it to be used for intramuscular injection in a controlled setting for people who may need it [during HIV vaccine research].
NCT00046397 Phase I Trial of Smallpox Vaccine Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 1 2002-09-01 This study will test the safety of an experimental vaccine called Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) for use against the smallpox virus. It will also investigate how many injections of MVA are needed to produce immunity against vaccinia virus, which is closely related to the smallpox virus. An effective smallpox vaccine exists, but it can cause side effects that, on rare occasions, can be life-threatening. The FDA gave new license approval for Dryvax on 10/25/02, but has not been used in the general population since smallpox was eradicated worldwide. Both the MVA and Dryvax® (Registered Trademark) vaccines are made using the vaccinia virus, however the MVA vaccine contains a more attenuated, or weakened, form of the virus. [http://www.fda.gov/cber/products/smalwye102502.htm] Healthy normal volunteers between 18 and 30 years of age, who have never been vaccinated with a smallpox vaccine, may be eligible for this study. Candidates will be screened with a medical history, physical examination, and blood and urine tests, including an HIV test and a pregnancy test for women of childbearing potential. MVA, placebo and Dryvax® (Registered Trademark) will be administered by different methods. The MVA vaccine and placebo are injected into an arm muscle with a needle and syringe. The Dryvax® (Registered Trademark) vaccine is administered, as it was for many years, with a special forked needle that is poked lightly into the skin of the upper arm, usually 15 times, in a process called scarification. When the vaccine works, a small pus-filled blister forms, followed by a scab and then scarring at the site of the vaccination. The formation of the blister and scab is called a take, indicating that the vaccine is effective and is evidence of the development of immunity. The development of a take suggests that an individual will be protected against smallpox for at least a few years. If scarification does not take, it can either mean that the person already has immunity or that the vaccine did not work. Participants will be assigned to groups, as well as, product randomly. For instance, the first study participant could be enrolled into group 3. The Dryvax® (Registered Trademark) dose is given as a challenge to see if the person has a take. A reduced take response or no take, could suggest that MVA is able to produce an immune response. The dosing schedules vary from 12 to 24 weeks and volunteers are in the study a total of 24 to 36 weeks, depending on the number of injections. Participants will be observed for at least 1 hour after each injection. They will come to the clinic a week after MVA or placebo injections and at least twice a week after Dryvax® (Registered Trademark) for about 21 days to have the injection site evaluated and photographed. At each visit, participants will be asked about how they are feeling and if they are taking any medications. Blood and urine tests will be done on injection days and at follow up visits scheduled 1 and 4 weeks after each immunization as well as 12 weeks after the Dryvax® (Registered Trademark) challenge dose. Additional tests may be done between visits if medically necessary.
NCT00053742 Phase I/II Trial of Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) Vaccine Against Smallpox Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 1 2003-02-01 This study will test the safety of an experimental vaccine called modified vaccinia virus ankara (MVA) and determine if it confers protection against the smallpox virus (variola). There is an existing vaccine, called Dryvax® (Registered Trademark), which is effective against smallpox; however, this vaccine can cause various side effects, including some that, on rare occasions, can be life-threatening. Dryvax® (Registered Trademark) has not been used in the United States since childhood vaccination was stopped in 1971, and though it is given to certain healthcare and laboratory workers, and some people in the armed forces, it is not recommended for the general population. Both the MVA and Dryvax® (Registered Trademark) vaccines are made using the vaccinia virus, which is closely related to variola. Healthy normal volunteers between 31 and 60 years of age who have been vaccinated with a smallpox vaccine more than 10 years before entering the study may be eligible for this protocol. Candidates will be screened with a medical history, physical examination, and blood and urine tests, including an HIV test and a pregnancy test for women of childbearing potential. Participants will receive MVA vaccine or placebo, followed by a dose of Dryvax® (Registered Trademark). The MVA vaccine and placebo are injected into an arm muscle with a needle and syringe. The Dryvax® (Registered Trademark) vaccine is administered with a special forked needle that is poked lightly into the skin of the upper arm, usually 15 times, in a process called scarification. When the vaccine works, a small pus-filled blister forms, followed by a scab and then scarring at the site of the vaccination. The formation of the blister and scab is called a take, indicating that the vaccine is effective and will protect against smallpox for at least a few years. If scarification does not take, it can either mean that the person already has immunity or that the vaccine did not work. Study participants will be randomly assigned to one of the following dosing groups: 1) one injection of MVA; 2) one injection of placebo; 3) two injections of MVA 4 weeks apart; or 4) two injections of placebo 4 weeks apart. All participants will receive a challenge dose of Dryvax® (Registered Trademark) 12 weeks after their last injection of MVA or placebo to determine if the MVA vaccine has conferred immunity. A take, that occurs in response to the Dryvax® (Registered Trademark) dose indicates lack of prior immunity, and thus tells whether one or two doses of MVA is needed to produce an immune response. Participants will be observed for at least 1 hour after each injection. They will come to the clinic at least once a week after MVA or placebo injections and at least twice a week after Dryvax® (Registered Trademark) to have the injection site evaluated and photographed. At each visit, participants will be asked how they are feeling and what medications, if any, they are taking. Blood and urine tests will be done according to the following schedule: - Before each injection; - 1 week after each injection; - 4 weeks after the MVA or placebo injections are finished; - At the time of the Dryvax® (Registered Trademark) dose; - 4 weeks after the Dryvax® (Registered Trademark) dose; - 12 weeks after the Dryvax® (Registered Trademark) dose. Additional laboratory tests may be done between visits if medically necessary.
NCT00437021 MVA Post-Event: Administration Timing and Boost Study Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 1/Phase 2 2007-04-01 The purpose of this study is to evaluate an investigational smallpox vaccine, called IMVAMUNE®, with respect to safety and immune (body's defense system) response. Participants will include healthy adults, age 18 or older born after 1971, who have not had smallpox vaccine before. Volunteers were originally assigned to 1 of 5 groups. In July 2007, a hold was placed on the Dryvax® groups and the study was modified. Volunteers, numbering 197, will be assigned by chance to one of 3 groups to be vaccinated twice with IMVAMUNE® vaccine or placebo (inactive substance) in Groups A and B, or to receive a single vaccination with IMVAMUNE® or placebo in Group F. Volunteers will complete a memory aid (diary) for 15 days following vaccination. Blood samples will be collected. Volunteers may participate for up to 425 days.
NCT00466245 Phase 2 Study of Safety, Tolerability, and Immunogenicity of Three Dose Levels of ACAM3000 Smallpox Vaccine Completed Sanofi Pasteur, a Sanofi Company Phase 2 2005-07-01 A phase 2 study to assess the MVA smallpox vaccine in previously vaccinated and vaccine- naive subjects at three dose levels.
NCT00565929 Safety, Reactogenicity and Immunogenicity of MVA in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) Subjects Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 1 2008-09-01 The purpose of this study is to compare how the body's immune system reacts to a vaccine against smallpox infection, called Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and to evaluate the safety of this vaccine. Study participants will include 24 adults, ages 18-60 years, who have undergone a stem cell transplant more than 2 years ago. Study procedures will include a physical exam, blood samples, heart activity assessments, and urine samples. Participants will be assigned to 1 of 2 possible study vaccine groups. The participants will receive 1 of 2 possible vaccine doses or placebo (substance containing no medication) 28 days apart. Participants will make at least 8 visits to the clinic during the course of the study; additional visits may be needed if the participant experiences side effects from the vaccine. Participants may be involved in study related procedures for about 6 months.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for smallpox (vaccinia) vaccine, live

Condition Name

Condition Name for smallpox (vaccinia) vaccine, live
Intervention Trials
Smallpox 3
Healthy 3
Variola Major (Smallpox) 2
Communicable Diseases 1
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for smallpox (vaccinia) vaccine, live
Intervention Trials
Smallpox 7
Vaccinia 3
Infection 1
Yellow Fever 1
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Clinical Trial Locations for smallpox (vaccinia) vaccine, live

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for smallpox (vaccinia) vaccine, live
Location Trials
United States 16
Korea, Republic of 1
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for smallpox (vaccinia) vaccine, live
Location Trials
Maryland 4
Missouri 2
Iowa 2
Oregon 1
Colorado 1
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Clinical Trial Progress for smallpox (vaccinia) vaccine, live

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for smallpox (vaccinia) vaccine, live
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 3 1
Phase 2 3
Phase 1/Phase 2 2
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for smallpox (vaccinia) vaccine, live
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 9
Withdrawn 1
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for smallpox (vaccinia) vaccine, live

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for smallpox (vaccinia) vaccine, live
Sponsor Trials
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) 7
Seoul National University Hospital 1
CJ HealthCare Corporation 1
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for smallpox (vaccinia) vaccine, live
Sponsor Trials
NIH 8
Industry 2
Other 1
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