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Last Updated: December 9, 2021

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR HEPATITIS B VACCINE (RECOMBINANT)

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All Clinical Trials for hepatitis b vaccine (recombinant)

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00100633 ↗ Safety of and Immune Response to a Hepatitis B Virus Vaccine Given With a Booster (CpG7909 ODN) in HIV Infected and HIV Uninfected People Completed National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Phase 1/Phase 2 2004-12-01 The purpose of the study is to determine the safety of and immune response to a hepatitis B virus vaccine series given with a boosting agent, CpG7909 oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN), in HIV infected and HIV uninfected individuals who previously failed to develop a response to hepatitis B vaccine. Study hypothesis: Administration of CpG7909 ODN together with recombinant hepatitis B vaccine will result in increased frequency and magnitude of response to vaccine in individuals who have previously failed to mount a response to vaccination, and that in HIV infected subjects with detectable plasma viremia, it will lead to the enhancement of HIV-specific responses.
NCT00114621 ↗ Anthrax Vaccine Clinical Trials Completed Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Phase 1 2004-09-08 This study will examine the recombinant, that is, produced by genetic engineering, protective antigen (rPA) that brings about antibodies to neutralize the anthrax toxin and that could therefore be predicted to offer protection against anthrax. Today, anthrax is rarely encountered in the United States, since the introduction of vaccines for cattle in the 1930s. A human vaccine was licensed in 1970. Vaccination against anthrax has been confined to people at risk, such as wool sorters and some veterinarians. However, the rising prospects of B. anthracis being used as a weapon have led to routine administration of the anthrax vaccine to members of the armed forces. Adults who are in good health may be eligible for this study. The involvement of 300 adults is planned. Participants will have a general physical exam and test for vital signs. There will also be collection of blood for chemistry and hematology; urinalysis; tests for HIV, hepatitis B and C, and liver function; and a pregnancy test, if applicable. On a random basis, patients will receive one of the rPA formulations. Two doses of rPA will be evaluated, 10 microgram ((Micro)g) and 20 (Micro)g. This evaluation aims to establish the safety and most desirable level of dosage. Patients will receive one injection of the vaccine, administered in the left shoulder or left thigh. About 30 minutes later, their temperature will be taken, and the injection site will be inspected. Rare but severe reactions could occur if there is extreme sensitivity to a vaccine. However, such an occurrence is extremely rare following a vaccine, and if there are any dangerous symptoms, they can be effectively treated by medications available to patients while they are at the clinic. If there are no significant abnormal results, patients may return home. About 6 hours later and daily for 7 days, they will take their temperature and examine the injection site. The vaccine may cause temporary discomfort at the site of injection, and participants may experience a mild fever for 1 or 2 days after vaccination. Patients will receive diary cards, a digital thermometer, and instructions on taking their temperature and measuring redness and swelling at the injection site, as well as for recording aches, muscle pain, or sensitivity to light for 7 days. They will be examined at the clinic at 72 hours following vaccination and also on the 7th day if they have a fever at or above 100.4 , if swelling is at or more than 2 inches, or if they request an exam. Meanwhile, a clinic staff member will call patients and discuss the findings. Then patients will receive a second and third injection of the same vaccine at 2-month intervals. There will also be interviews about patients' health at each visit to the clinic, plus monitoring of the vaccination after 6 hours and for 7 days. One year later, patients will receive a fourth injection of the same vaccine. Direct benefit to participants in this study is not guaranteed, although an antibody response is predicted. The results in this study will help in the development of improved vaccines for anthrax.
NCT00924092 ↗ An Open Label Phase I Study to Eval the Safety and Tolerability of a Vaccine (GI-6207) Consisting of Whole, Heat-killed Recombinant Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (Yeast) Genetically Modified to Express CEA Protein in Adults With Metastatic CEA-expressing Completed National Cancer Institute (NCI) Phase 1 2009-03-13 Objectives: - To find out the maximum tolerated dose of the GI-6207 vaccine (the highest dose that does not cause unacceptable side effects), and to evaluate any side effects. - To see if GI-6207 has any effect on patients tumors. - To learn how the vaccine causes immune responses against the cancer. Eligibility: - Patients 18 years of age and older who have been diagnosed with a cancer that has not responded to standard treatments. Patients must not be allergic to yeast or yeast products. Design: - Initial physical examination, blood and tissue sampling, computed tomography (CT) scan, and skin test to determine eligibility for the procedure. - Treatment with GI-6027 in seven 14-day cycles as follows: - Vaccine administered on days 1, 15, 29, 43, 57, 71, and 85. - Vaccine given at four sites around the body: right and left chest area below the armpit, and right and left upper thigh in the pelvic region. (These areas drain into parts of your body that contain large numbers of lymph nodes. The lymph nodes contain immune cells that may be activated by the vaccine to target cancer cells.) - Clinic visits for physical examinations to check vital signs, take additional blood and urine samples, and perform other tests needed for the study. - After day 85 (about 3 months), patients will continue to receive vaccine monthly (or every 28 days) as long as the vaccine is not producing harmful effects or side effects and the cancer is either stable or reducing. Patients who do well on the vaccine may continue to receive it for as long as it is available.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for hepatitis b vaccine (recombinant)

Condition Name

Condition Name for hepatitis b vaccine (recombinant)
Intervention Trials
Malaria,Falciparum 2
Chronic Hepatitis B 2
Anthrax 1
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for hepatitis b vaccine (recombinant)
Intervention Trials
Hepatitis B 3
Hepatitis, Chronic 2
Hepatitis A 2
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Clinical Trial Locations for hepatitis b vaccine (recombinant)

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for hepatitis b vaccine (recombinant)
Location Trials
United States 4
Mali 2
Nepal 2
Burkina Faso 2
India 1
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for hepatitis b vaccine (recombinant)
Location Trials
Maryland 2
District of Columbia 1
Ohio 1
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Clinical Trial Progress for hepatitis b vaccine (recombinant)

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for hepatitis b vaccine (recombinant)
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 1
Phase 3 2
Phase 2 1
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for hepatitis b vaccine (recombinant)
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Completed 7
Unknown status 1
Active, not recruiting 1
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for hepatitis b vaccine (recombinant)

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for hepatitis b vaccine (recombinant)
Sponsor Trials
Institut de Recherche en Sciences de la Sante, Burkina Faso 2
Malaria Research and Training Center, Bamako, Mali 2
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 2
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for hepatitis b vaccine (recombinant)
Sponsor Trials
Other 14
NIH 3
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