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Last Updated: May 15, 2021

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR YERVOY

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All Clinical Trials for YERVOY

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Start Date Summary
NCT00586391 CD19 Chimeric Receptor Expressing T Lymphocytes In B-Cell Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma, ALL & CLL Active, not recruiting Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Baylor College of Medicine Phase 1 2009-02-01 Patients on this study have a type of lymph gland cancer called non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (these diseases will be referred to as "Lymphoma" or "Leukemia"). Their Lymphoma or Leukemia has come back or has not gone away after treatment (including the best treatment known for these cancers). This research study is a gene transfer study using special immune cells. The body has different ways of fighting infection and disease. No one way seems perfect for fighting cancers. This research study combines two different ways of fighting disease, antibodies and T cells, hoping that they will work together. Antibodies are types of proteins that protect the body from bacterial and other diseases. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells including tumor cells. Both antibodies and T cells have been used to treat patients with cancers; they have shown promise, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. T lymphocytes can kill tumor cells but there normally are not enough of them to kill all the tumor cells. Some researchers have taken T cells from a person's blood, grown more of them in the laboratory and then given them back to the person. The antibody used in this study is called anti-CD19. It first came from mice that have developed immunity to human lymphoma. This antibody sticks to cancer cells because of a substance on the outside of these cells called CD19. CD19 antibodies have been used to treat people with lymphoma and Leukemia. For this study anti-CD19 has been changed so that instead of floating free in the blood it is now joined to the T cells. When an antibody is joined to a T cell in this way it is called a chimeric receptor. In the laboratory, investigators have also found that T cells work better if they also put a protein that stimulates T cells called CD28. Investigators hope that adding the CD28 might also make the cells last for a longer time in the body. These CD19 chimeric receptor T cells with C28 T cells are investigational products not approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The purpose of this study is to find the biggest dose of chimeric T cells that is safe, to see how the T cell with this sort of chimeric receptor lasts, to learn what the side effects are and to see whether this therapy might help people with lymphoma or leukemia.
NCT00586391 CD19 Chimeric Receptor Expressing T Lymphocytes In B-Cell Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma, ALL & CLL Active, not recruiting Texas Children's Hospital Phase 1 2009-02-01 Patients on this study have a type of lymph gland cancer called non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (these diseases will be referred to as "Lymphoma" or "Leukemia"). Their Lymphoma or Leukemia has come back or has not gone away after treatment (including the best treatment known for these cancers). This research study is a gene transfer study using special immune cells. The body has different ways of fighting infection and disease. No one way seems perfect for fighting cancers. This research study combines two different ways of fighting disease, antibodies and T cells, hoping that they will work together. Antibodies are types of proteins that protect the body from bacterial and other diseases. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells including tumor cells. Both antibodies and T cells have been used to treat patients with cancers; they have shown promise, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. T lymphocytes can kill tumor cells but there normally are not enough of them to kill all the tumor cells. Some researchers have taken T cells from a person's blood, grown more of them in the laboratory and then given them back to the person. The antibody used in this study is called anti-CD19. It first came from mice that have developed immunity to human lymphoma. This antibody sticks to cancer cells because of a substance on the outside of these cells called CD19. CD19 antibodies have been used to treat people with lymphoma and Leukemia. For this study anti-CD19 has been changed so that instead of floating free in the blood it is now joined to the T cells. When an antibody is joined to a T cell in this way it is called a chimeric receptor. In the laboratory, investigators have also found that T cells work better if they also put a protein that stimulates T cells called CD28. Investigators hope that adding the CD28 might also make the cells last for a longer time in the body. These CD19 chimeric receptor T cells with C28 T cells are investigational products not approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The purpose of this study is to find the biggest dose of chimeric T cells that is safe, to see how the T cell with this sort of chimeric receptor lasts, to learn what the side effects are and to see whether this therapy might help people with lymphoma or leukemia.
NCT00586391 CD19 Chimeric Receptor Expressing T Lymphocytes In B-Cell Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma, ALL & CLL Active, not recruiting The Methodist Hospital System Phase 1 2009-02-01 Patients on this study have a type of lymph gland cancer called non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (these diseases will be referred to as "Lymphoma" or "Leukemia"). Their Lymphoma or Leukemia has come back or has not gone away after treatment (including the best treatment known for these cancers). This research study is a gene transfer study using special immune cells. The body has different ways of fighting infection and disease. No one way seems perfect for fighting cancers. This research study combines two different ways of fighting disease, antibodies and T cells, hoping that they will work together. Antibodies are types of proteins that protect the body from bacterial and other diseases. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells including tumor cells. Both antibodies and T cells have been used to treat patients with cancers; they have shown promise, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. T lymphocytes can kill tumor cells but there normally are not enough of them to kill all the tumor cells. Some researchers have taken T cells from a person's blood, grown more of them in the laboratory and then given them back to the person. The antibody used in this study is called anti-CD19. It first came from mice that have developed immunity to human lymphoma. This antibody sticks to cancer cells because of a substance on the outside of these cells called CD19. CD19 antibodies have been used to treat people with lymphoma and Leukemia. For this study anti-CD19 has been changed so that instead of floating free in the blood it is now joined to the T cells. When an antibody is joined to a T cell in this way it is called a chimeric receptor. In the laboratory, investigators have also found that T cells work better if they also put a protein that stimulates T cells called CD28. Investigators hope that adding the CD28 might also make the cells last for a longer time in the body. These CD19 chimeric receptor T cells with C28 T cells are investigational products not approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The purpose of this study is to find the biggest dose of chimeric T cells that is safe, to see how the T cell with this sort of chimeric receptor lasts, to learn what the side effects are and to see whether this therapy might help people with lymphoma or leukemia.
NCT00586391 CD19 Chimeric Receptor Expressing T Lymphocytes In B-Cell Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma, ALL & CLL Active, not recruiting Baylor College of Medicine Phase 1 2009-02-01 Patients on this study have a type of lymph gland cancer called non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (these diseases will be referred to as "Lymphoma" or "Leukemia"). Their Lymphoma or Leukemia has come back or has not gone away after treatment (including the best treatment known for these cancers). This research study is a gene transfer study using special immune cells. The body has different ways of fighting infection and disease. No one way seems perfect for fighting cancers. This research study combines two different ways of fighting disease, antibodies and T cells, hoping that they will work together. Antibodies are types of proteins that protect the body from bacterial and other diseases. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells including tumor cells. Both antibodies and T cells have been used to treat patients with cancers; they have shown promise, but have not been strong enough to cure most patients. T lymphocytes can kill tumor cells but there normally are not enough of them to kill all the tumor cells. Some researchers have taken T cells from a person's blood, grown more of them in the laboratory and then given them back to the person. The antibody used in this study is called anti-CD19. It first came from mice that have developed immunity to human lymphoma. This antibody sticks to cancer cells because of a substance on the outside of these cells called CD19. CD19 antibodies have been used to treat people with lymphoma and Leukemia. For this study anti-CD19 has been changed so that instead of floating free in the blood it is now joined to the T cells. When an antibody is joined to a T cell in this way it is called a chimeric receptor. In the laboratory, investigators have also found that T cells work better if they also put a protein that stimulates T cells called CD28. Investigators hope that adding the CD28 might also make the cells last for a longer time in the body. These CD19 chimeric receptor T cells with C28 T cells are investigational products not approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The purpose of this study is to find the biggest dose of chimeric T cells that is safe, to see how the T cell with this sort of chimeric receptor lasts, to learn what the side effects are and to see whether this therapy might help people with lymphoma or leukemia.
NCT00972933 Immunogenicity and Biomarker Analysis of Neoadjuvant Ipilimumab for Melanoma Active, not recruiting Bristol-Myers Squibb Phase 0 2009-12-01 Ipilimumab is a manufactured monoclonal antibody, much like the antibodies usually made by the human body to fight off infection; however it is not known why the human body does not "fight off" a cancerous tumor. The idea behind developing this experimental drug is to stimulate the immune system to make antibodies to kill cancer cells. This research study is considered "experimental" because it has not received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of this type of cancer. This monoclonal antibody has been specifically made to block Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4), which is a protein found on cells of the immune system. CTLA4 seems to slow down the immune response, so blocking it with an anti-CTLA4 antibody may make the immune response more active. The purpose of this study is to see if Ipilimumab affects the response of the patient's immune system toward their cancer.
>Trial ID >Title >Status >Phase >Start Date >Summary

Clinical Trial Conditions for YERVOY

Condition Name

Condition Name for YERVOY
Intervention Trials
Melanoma 35
Metastatic Melanoma 16
Renal Cell Carcinoma 10
Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer 7
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for YERVOY
Intervention Trials
Melanoma 67
Carcinoma 33
Carcinoma, Renal Cell 24
Lung Neoplasms 24
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Clinical Trial Locations for YERVOY

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for YERVOY
Location Trials
United States 783
Japan 70
Australia 62
Canada 44
United Kingdom 39
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for YERVOY
Location Trials
Texas 62
California 54
Massachusetts 45
New York 43
Pennsylvania 40
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Clinical Trial Progress for YERVOY

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for YERVOY
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 4 3
Phase 3 16
Phase 2/Phase 3 4
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for YERVOY
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Recruiting 85
Not yet recruiting 82
Active, not recruiting 27
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for YERVOY

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for YERVOY
Sponsor Trials
Bristol-Myers Squibb 107
National Cancer Institute (NCI) 33
M.D. Anderson Cancer Center 31
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for YERVOY
Sponsor Trials
Other 180
Industry 160
NIH 35
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