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Generated: October 18, 2018

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CLINICAL TRIALS PROFILE FOR AMMONIUM CHLORIDE 2.14%

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Clinical Trials for AMMONIUM CHLORIDE 2.14%

Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary
NCT01690039 Influence of Polymorphisms in the ATP6V1 Gene of the V-ATPase on the Development of Incomplete Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis Recruiting University Hospital Inselspital, Berne N/A Purpose 1. To compare the performance of the two currently employed urinary acidifications tests in stone formers, the furosemide/fludrocortisone and ammonium chloride loading test. 2. To study the impact of polymorphisms in the genes ATP6V1B1, ATP6V0A4 and SLC4A1 on urinary acidification in stone formers.
NCT02360826 Statin Distribution Recruiting American Heart Association Phase 1 Anticipating an increased use of statins in children and adolescents, it is imperative that we understand the genetic and developmental characteristics affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of statins in childhood and adolescence. Simply extrapolating pediatric dosing guidelines from adult dose-exposure-response relationships fails to recognize the potential impact of growth and development in pediatric patients, which may have important clinical implications for drug efficacy or toxicity. Current evidence indicates that genetic variation in the SLCO1B1 transporter is important for statin disposition and toxicity in adults. The ontogeny of SLCO1B1 during human growth and development has not been well characterized, and limited pediatric data indicate that the genotype-phenotype relationship in children is the opposite of that observed in adults. Therefore, investigating the relative roles of SLCO1B1 ontogeny and genetic variation in statin disposition and response is key to determining the age at which the statin dose-exposure-response relationship mimics adults, and has important implications for other medications transported by the SLCO1B1 protein. As the first step in this process, our specific aims for the current investigation are 1) to determine the effect of genetic variation of SLCO1B1 on the pharmacokinetics of pravastatin and simvastatin by comparing Cmax, AUC and elimination between children and adolescents with 2 functional SLCO1B1 alleles and those with one or more variant alleles, and 2) to determine if the magnitude of the genetic effect on pravastatin pharmacokinetics (defined as Cmax, AUC and elimination) is equivalent to the effect on simvastatin pharmacokinetics. As a secondary aim, Cmax and AUC of pravastatin and simvastatin will be compared between children and adolescents for each genotype group. These results will be utilized to determine the sample size necessary to adequately power future studies characterizing the role of ontogeny on statin disposition. The ultimate goal of this proposed investigation is to establish the role of genetic variation in key transporters on the dose-exposure relationship of two commonly used statin drugs in children. This study is the first step in a series of investigations aimed at determining the mechanisms behind variations in physiologic response, clinical efficacy and significant adverse effect risk that surround the statin drugs in children and adolescents.
NCT02360826 Statin Distribution Recruiting Children's Mercy Hospital Kansas City Phase 1 Anticipating an increased use of statins in children and adolescents, it is imperative that we understand the genetic and developmental characteristics affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of statins in childhood and adolescence. Simply extrapolating pediatric dosing guidelines from adult dose-exposure-response relationships fails to recognize the potential impact of growth and development in pediatric patients, which may have important clinical implications for drug efficacy or toxicity. Current evidence indicates that genetic variation in the SLCO1B1 transporter is important for statin disposition and toxicity in adults. The ontogeny of SLCO1B1 during human growth and development has not been well characterized, and limited pediatric data indicate that the genotype-phenotype relationship in children is the opposite of that observed in adults. Therefore, investigating the relative roles of SLCO1B1 ontogeny and genetic variation in statin disposition and response is key to determining the age at which the statin dose-exposure-response relationship mimics adults, and has important implications for other medications transported by the SLCO1B1 protein. As the first step in this process, our specific aims for the current investigation are 1) to determine the effect of genetic variation of SLCO1B1 on the pharmacokinetics of pravastatin and simvastatin by comparing Cmax, AUC and elimination between children and adolescents with 2 functional SLCO1B1 alleles and those with one or more variant alleles, and 2) to determine if the magnitude of the genetic effect on pravastatin pharmacokinetics (defined as Cmax, AUC and elimination) is equivalent to the effect on simvastatin pharmacokinetics. As a secondary aim, Cmax and AUC of pravastatin and simvastatin will be compared between children and adolescents for each genotype group. These results will be utilized to determine the sample size necessary to adequately power future studies characterizing the role of ontogeny on statin disposition. The ultimate goal of this proposed investigation is to establish the role of genetic variation in key transporters on the dose-exposure relationship of two commonly used statin drugs in children. This study is the first step in a series of investigations aimed at determining the mechanisms behind variations in physiologic response, clinical efficacy and significant adverse effect risk that surround the statin drugs in children and adolescents.
NCT02644135 A Pilot Study of the Safety, Tolerability, and Effectiveness of Halo Completed University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center N/A This is a pilot study of the safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of Halo to prevent acute upper respiratory illness and respiratory virus infections. This study will be conducted at one site (University Hospitals Case Medical Center) in healthy adults during the upcoming respiratory virus season (12/15/11 to 3/14/12). The intervention will be with Halo, a commercial product which is FDA-approved for the treatment of xerostomia. The placebo will consist of the phosphate buffered saline plus the preservatives in the Halo formulation and without CPC - the active antiseptic. This placebo was chosen as the Halo formulation without CPC serves to act as a barrier to attachment of oral pathogens, and as such is an important contributing factor to its antimicrobial activity (see above). Also, the formulation without CPC with preservatives exhibits some antibacterial and antiviral activity. Moreover, the formulation without CPC and no preservatives is easily contaminated and not practical to utilize as the placebo in these studies. Male and female participants 18-45 years of age will be recruited and monitored for the development of, duration, and severity of clinical symptoms and signs consistent with acute respiratory disease (defined below) captured daily through diaries, and PCR confirmation of important respiratory viruses including influenza, rhinoviruses, adenoviruses, and respiratory syncytial virus during episodes of acute respiratory disease during the length of the study will be undertaken. Secondary objectives will assess the tolerance, acceptability and adherence to Halo as well as the change in the bacterial (oral streptococci and Group A streptococcus) and fungal microflora in the oropharynx. School or work absenteeism, visits to physicians' offices, emergency departments and urgent care centers will also be captured. Conventional cultures for these bacterial and fungal organisms will be pursued (see below). Throughout the study period, the safety, tolerability, acceptability and adherence to study products will be assessed.
Trial ID Title Status Sponsor Phase Summary

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Clinical Trial Conditions for AMMONIUM CHLORIDE 2.14%

Condition Name

Condition Name for AMMONIUM CHLORIDE 2.14%
Intervention Trials
Nephrolithiasis 1
Healthy 1
Drug Distribution 1
Acidosis, Renal Tubular 1
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Condition MeSH

Condition MeSH for AMMONIUM CHLORIDE 2.14%
Intervention Trials
Nephrolithiasis 1
Kidney Calculi 1
Acidosis, Renal Tubular 1
Acidosis 1
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Clinical Trial Locations for AMMONIUM CHLORIDE 2.14%

Trials by Country

Trials by Country for AMMONIUM CHLORIDE 2.14%
Location Trials
United States 1
Switzerland 1
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Trials by US State

Trials by US State for AMMONIUM CHLORIDE 2.14%
Location Trials
Missouri 1
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Clinical Trial Progress for AMMONIUM CHLORIDE 2.14%

Clinical Trial Phase

Clinical Trial Phase for AMMONIUM CHLORIDE 2.14%
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Phase 1 1
N/A 2
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Clinical Trial Status

Clinical Trial Status for AMMONIUM CHLORIDE 2.14%
Clinical Trial Phase Trials
Recruiting 2
Completed 1
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Clinical Trial Sponsors for AMMONIUM CHLORIDE 2.14%

Sponsor Name

Sponsor Name for AMMONIUM CHLORIDE 2.14%
Sponsor Trials
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center 1
Children's Mercy Hospital Kansas City 1
American Heart Association 1
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Sponsor Type

Sponsor Type for AMMONIUM CHLORIDE 2.14%
Sponsor Trials
Other 4
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Serving hundreds of leading biopharmaceutical companies globally:

Covington
Merck
US Department of Justice
Argus Health
Cantor Fitzgerald
Chubb
Citi
Chinese Patent Office
Federal Trade Commission

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