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Competitive intelligence on small-molecule drugs and the 80,000 patents covering them

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Glossary

Applicant
The firm holding legal responsibility for the new drug application.

Trade Name
The trade name of the product as shown on the labeling.

Generic Name / Ingredient
The active ingredient(s) for the product. Multiple ingredients are in alphabetical order separated by a semicolon.

New Drug Application (NDA) Number
The FDA-assigned number to the application.

Product Number
The FDA-assigned number to identify the application products. Each strength is a separate product.

Approval Date
The date the product was approved as stated in the FDA approval letter to the applicant.

Type
The group or category of approved drugs; RX, OTC, or DISCN.

Reference Listed Drug (RLD)
The pioneer or innovator of the drug.  The RLD identifies the product Abbreviated New Drug Applications (ANDA) use as a reference. 

Drug Product Flag
Patents listed after August 18, 2003 may have a drug product flag indicating the sponsor submitted the patent as claiming the drug product. The FDA defines a drug product as a finished dosage form, for example, tablet, capsule, or solution, that contains a drug substance, generally, but not necessarily, in association with one or more other ingredients

Drug Substance Flag
Patents listed after August 18, 2003 may have a drug substance flag indicating the sponsor submitted the patent as claiming the drug substance. The FDA defines a drug substance as an active ingredient that is intended to furnish pharmacological activity or other direct effect in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease or to affect the structure or any function of the human body, but does not include intermediates used in the synthesis of such ingredient.

Patent Delist Request Flag
Sponsor has requested patent be delisted.  This patent has remained listed because a first applicant may retain eligibility for 180-day exclusivity based on a paragraph IV certification. 

Patent Number
Patent numbers as submitted to the FDA by the applicant, who may not be the patent-assignee.  A '*PED' tag indicates pediatric exclusivity granted by the FDA. 

Patent Expiration Date
The date the patent expires as submitted by the applicant holder, including applicable extensions.  A '*PED' tag indicates pediatric exclusivity granted by the FDA. 

Dosage form; Route of Administration
The product dosage form and route separated by a semi-colon. 

Strength
The potency of the active ingredient.  May repeat for multiple part products.

Therapeutic Equivalence (TE) Code
The TE Code indicates the therapeutic equivalence rating of generic to innovator Rx products.

The two basic categories into which multisource drugs have been placed are indicated by the first letter as follows:

    A
    Drug products that FDA considers to be therapeutically equivalent to other pharmaceutically equivalent products, i.e., drug products for which:
    1. there are no known or suspected bioequivalence problems. These are designated AA, AN, AO, AP, or AT, depending on the dosage form; or
    2. actual or potential bioequivalence problems have been resolved with adequate in vivo and/or in vitro evidence supporting bioequivalence. These are designated AB.
    B
    Drug products that FDA at this time, considers NOT to be therapeutically equivalent to other pharmaceutically equivalent products, i.e.,
      drug products for which actual or potential bioequivalence problems have not been resolved by adequate evidence of bioequivalence. Often the problem is with specific dosage forms rather than with the active ingredients. These are designated BC, BD, BE, BN, BP, BR, BS, BT, BX, or B*.

Patented / Exclusive Use
Designation to designate exclusivity granted to a drug product. 

Exclusivity Expiration Date
The date the exclusivity expires.

Tentative Approval
If a generic drug product is ready for approval before the expiration of any patents or exclusivities, the FDA issues a tentative approval letter to the applicant. Final approval of the generic drug product is delayed until all patent or exclusivity issues have been resolved. A tentative approval does not allow the applicant to market the generic drug product.

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Drugs may be covered by multiple patents or regulatory protections. All trademarks and applicant names are the property of their respective owners or licensors.

Although great care is taken in the proper and correct provision of this service, thinkBiotech LLC does not accept any responsibility for possible consequences of errors or omissions in the provided information. There is no warranty that the information contained herein is error free. Users of this service are advised to seek professional advice and independent confirmation before considering acting on any of the provided information. thinkBiotech LLC reserves the right to amend, extend or withdraw any part or all of the offered service without notice.

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